Did I Commit a Mortal Sin? Passive Participation in Drug Use
#11
Did you perchance know that it is a sin, that you have the full consent of the will, and you know the full extent of what are you doing? It seems to me that you do not have a full consent of the will, and so, you did not commit a mortal sin. However, double-check with your confessor.

N.
Reply
#12
(06-15-2015, 11:16 AM)Neopelagianus Wrote: Did you perchance know that it is a sin?
N.
-Yes, I'm aware of the sinfulness in taking the drugs and in my case not doing anything to stop it and even participating in the sin by approving of the sinful action by passing the bong.
(06-15-2015, 11:16 AM)Neopelagianus Wrote: ...full consent of the will, and you know the full extent of what are you doing? It seems to me that you do not have a full consent of the will, and so, you did not commit a mortal sin.
N.
-I'm pretty sure I had full consent of the will.  I was not at all intoxicated but I was really stressed and wanted the event to be over with.  The guy was holding the bong 2 inches from my face, I felt like punching him in the face. I passed to it to get it away from my self.  In this I question if had full consent of the will.
Reply
#13
(06-15-2015, 04:00 PM)MacPasquale Wrote:
(06-15-2015, 11:16 AM)Neopelagianus Wrote: Did you perchance know that it is a sin?
N.
-Yes, I'm aware of the sinfulness in taking the drugs and in my case not doing anything to stop it and even participating in the sin by approving of the sinful action by passing the bong.
(06-15-2015, 11:16 AM)Neopelagianus Wrote: ...full consent of the will, and you know the full extent of what are you doing? It seems to me that you do not have a full consent of the will, and so, you did not commit a mortal sin.
N.
-I'm pretty sure I had full consent of the will.  I was not at all intoxicated but I was really stressed and wanted the event to be over with.  The guy was holding the bong 2 inches from my face, I felt like punching him in the face. I passed to it to get it away from my self.  In this I question if had full consent of the will.

Yes, but it sounds like you didn't have full knowledge, because even now you don't know if it was a sin. Still, it costs nothing to mention it at confession (even if it was a crime the priest cannot incriminate you, so I gather).
Reply
#14
In order to assess the objective and subjective guilt of sin, if any, you need to provide more information than you have, but as others have said, consult a trustworthy priest about that.

On the other hand, I think you're getting too hung up about whether you sinned, what kind of sin, how do you know, etc. What is the big picture here? Clearly you made some mistakes: you don't know how to handle these situations; things happen fast and it's hard to properly process them according to prudence and wisdom.

Nevertheless, all things being equal, should a publicly known Christian voluntarily be anywhere near such situations? Your silent presence broadcasts one psychological message, whether you like it or not, whether everyone around you knows your opinions on drug use or not: I'm silent--continue with your activities. Silence in this case means at the very least an acceptance of their behavior. The opportunity to witness, which you missed, would look more like this: you stand up, say in a clear voice something along the lines of: "You all know what I think about drug use. I cannot participate in something like this. Call me when you guys [go back to whatever harmless activity you were formerly doing]." And you leave.

This action establishes a clear boundary: I am a Christian; I believe this is wrong, so I will not participate or be even near it. If you guys want to do sinless activities, I am down for it.

Same thing with driving a person to buy drugs. It's really pretty simple but takes balls to carry out: "I will not drive you to buy drugs. You have to get them on your own." If the person argues, you simply repeat, "I will not drive you to buy drugs. You have to get them on your own." And you become a record player and refuse to argue. It's simply establishing and keeping boundaries, the boundaries required of a Christian.

Some specific circumstantial or prudential considerations may adjust the above, but as a general rule, I think the above applies to many circumstances: stating clear boundaries and sticking to them. And remember, a boundary has nothing to do with how you will treat others (which is always with kindness, charity, consideration, etc.) but what YOU will do IN RESPONSE to a situation or behavior that you don't approve of.

If people ask later why you did what you did, then you can explain it to them in all gentleness and prudence etc.

It's a matter of witnessing that you will not compromise your values; that your money is where your mouth is. It's one thing to talk but another thing to walk, literally in this case.
Reply
#15
I talked to a priest.  Having people to play music isn't losing my soul over.  I'm cutting them off.
Reply
#16
(06-21-2015, 08:12 PM)MacPasquale Wrote: I talked to a priest.  Having people to play music isn't losing my soul over.  I'm cutting them off.

Isn't worth losing my soul over
Reply
#17


Recreational drug use, in se, isn't a sin. It might be a sin if they're used immoderately, if the drug is clearly and directly harmful to the body, or if the drug in question is illegal in your area, but drug use in itself isn't a sin any more than drinking alcohol is in itself (something else that can be either used or abused).
Reply
#18
(06-22-2015, 06:49 AM)Vox Clamantis Wrote: Recreational drug use, in se, isn't a sin. It might be a sin if they're used immoderately, if the drug is clearly and directly harmful to the body, or if the drug in question is illegal in your area, but drug use in itself isn't a sin any more than drinking alcohol is in itself (something else that can be either used or abused).

It was being used immoderately
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)