Catholic Diet
#1
Found this interesting thread in the archives.

LatinPassion Wrote:Does anyone find it rather interesting that the diet of eating fish on wednesdays and fridays imposed on us and weekly mass, is actually very healthy. I'm taking a health and nutrition course and the professor mentioned that having fish at least once or twice a week is very healthy and having wine at least once a week is good too. As soon as she said that I quickly thought, wait a minute thats what was required of catholics before. So in essence we can say that, that diet was in fact of divine nature. For we are enfleshed souls and what goes in reflects our outer appearance too. Anyone ever noticed the idea that catholicism had this mandate in effect way before nutritionist noticed the value of the fish and wine diet ?
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#2
I have noticed this before! Also, the periods of fasting and feasting are good for the body. But it makes sense. When we depart from God, we also depart from nature and from what is good for the body, and vice versa, as the Pope says in Laudato Si.

The best diet is the one that follows the Catholic liturgical year and practices.

In The Path to Rome, Belloc even jokingly suggests (though there is something to it), that beginning the day with mass and its up and downs of kneeling and standing is good exercise with which to start the day.

All kinds of fools in the West are doing tai chi moves they could get just as well by attending Mass. Plus all the other benefits.
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#3
(06-28-2015, 02:08 PM)maldon Wrote: I have noticed this before! Also, the periods of fasting and feasting are good for the body. But it makes sense. When we depart from God, we also depart from nature and from what is good for the body, and vice versa, as the Pope says in Laudato Si.

The best diet is the one that follows the Catholic liturgical year and practices.

In The Path to Rome, Belloc even jokingly suggests (though there is something to it), that beginning the day with mass and its up and downs of kneeling and standing is good exercise with which to start the day.

All kinds of fools in the West are doing tai chi moves they could get just as well by attending Mass. Plus all the other benefits.

The benefits of attending Mass are, or should be, indisputable.  However, when a daily Mass is either too hard to find, at an hour that is impossible at worst or extremely difficult at best to get to, it makes us fools "doing tai chi moves" on a daily basis for health, quietude, and improved balance seem maybe not quite so foolish.  Even better, if a daily Mass is available and one is able to make it daily, doing Tai Chi only takes 10-20 minutes (depending on the form and style) so one can have even more benefits by doing both!  They are not mutually exclusive.

There is much in nature that is extremely harmful and even deadly.  "It's natural so it must be good for you" is a common mantra we here these days.  Well, cobra venom is natural too, but you might want to avoid it.  Mercury is natural but can wreak horrendous havoc on one's neurological system.  The venom of the black widow is totally natural, but you probably don't want to ingest it.

"...what is good for the body..." seems to be highly debatable and changes frequently depending on who you listen to.

Having said all of that...I would readily concur that fasting in the tradition of Orthodoxy (and perhaps traditional Catholicism or orthodoxy), according to the liturgical calendar can be extremely beneficial on many levels.
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