Need some help here...please.
#1
So I had quite a flirtation with Orthodox/Eastern Christianity, its theology and such. It's resulted in me not understanding Latin theology and philosophy all that well. At this point, that flirtation has basically died away. Can anyone recommend me some good books or websites or whatever on such a subject? I don't want to be left so confused.

Specific subjects I can think of that would be discussed would be things like grace (created versus uncreated or just created in of itself) or the Filioque or the Beatific Vision.

Thanks!

Edit: I know that Thomas Aquinas is great. I'm not doubting that by any means. But I would like something a bit...more simple or straight forward. Or maybe written not as long ago.
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#2
The Catholic Encyclopaedia was written and edited by a diverse bunch of scholars from around the world in the early C20th.

Type just about anything you like into the search box and it will come up with a pretty good summary of the Catholic take. Always a good place to start... you can dig deeper afterward if you like.

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/
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#3
Ludwig Ott's "Fundamentals of Catholic Dogma" would give a good general overview of latin theology.  Volume 2 of Pohle and Preuss goes over the Trinity and has a section on the Processions.  Volume 7 of Pohle and Preuss goes over the Latin understanding of grace, but I don't remember it ever comparing east and western views over created and uncreated grace.  All of these can be found for free on the Archive.  Myself I know virtually nothing on eastern views on created and uncreated grace and would like to know what would be good to read on that subject myself.
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#4
The Modern Catholic Dictionary would be a good one.  New Advent as well, as has been recommended.

Here is a link to the Modern Catholic Dictionary
http://www.therealpresence.org/dictionary/adict.htm

I also recommend you build up a devotional life that is more or less exclusively Latin-Rite Catholic.  Some suggestions:  Go to adoration.  Pray the rosary, the Stations of the Cross, and the prayers to saints that you find on holy cards.  Make novenas.  Pray using a traditional Catholic prayer book that is intended for Latin-Rite Catholics.  If there are some Eastern Christian devotions you enjoy, it might be OK to continue them eventually but because Eastern theology has caused you a lot of confusion, I would suggest you avoid everything Eastern for a time.  That's just me though- admittedly, my view has been tainted by my experience of all the "this is how they do it in the East and it is SO much better" ( :blah: ) folks I encountered on another forum.
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#5
The book, "Orthodoxy and Catholicism: A comparison" by Dave Armstrong might be useful The kindle version is quite cheap and can be found here http://www.amazon.com/Orthodoxy-Catholicism-Comparison-Dave-Armstrong-ebook/dp/B00O145WDQ/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1437359352&sr=8-2&keywords=dave+armstrong+orthodoxy&pebp=1437359357607&perid=0EKAQ3KDG9PQFQXMQ4HD

Despite the claims of the one negative review given by the sort of bellicose Easterner that you often find on the internet, the book goes to great lengths to be fair and is in no way a raging polemic against Orthodoxy. You have to remember that when you learn something new you ultimately must contextualize it within what you already know, so trying to learn Western theology and philosophy apart from what you have taken from the East is making your goal that much harder to achieve.

Also I'm not convinced that you have to abandon the East wholesale. I suppose if you think there is a genuine temptation to jump ship to Orthodoxy you should avoid it, but if you really have gotten over your infatuation as you seem to suggest, then you probably aren't in any immediate danger.
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#6
(07-19-2015, 10:17 PM)Credidi Propter Wrote: The Modern Catholic Dictionary would be a good one.  New Advent as well, as has been recommended.

Here is a link to the Modern Catholic Dictionary
http://www.therealpresence.org/dictionary/adict.htm

I also recommend you build up a devotional life that is more or less exclusively Latin-Rite Catholic.  Some suggestions:  Go to adoration.  Pray the rosary, the Stations of the Cross, and the prayers to saints that you find on holy cards.  Make novenas.  Pray using a traditional Catholic prayer book that is intended for Latin-Rite Catholics.  If there are some Eastern Christian devotions you enjoy, it might be OK to continue them eventually but because Eastern theology has caused you a lot of confusion, I would suggest you avoid everything Eastern for a time.  That's just me though- admittedly, my view has been tainted by my experience of all the "this is how they do it in the East and it is SO much better" ( :blah: ) folks I encountered on another forum.

Yeah...this is probably a good idea. It's not that I had toxic encounters with my Eastern friends. They've all been very friendly. But there was a bit of that "it's all better over here." Although I had a few who were really into so-called "Western Rite Orthodoxy," and it is pretty much perfectly valid in the Orthodox communion and seemed to offer a solution. So that didn't help either. So Latin Catholicism, here I come.
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#7
(07-19-2015, 11:02 PM)MeanGene Wrote: The book, "Orthodoxy and Catholicism: A comparison" by Dave Armstrong might be useful The kindle version is quite cheap and can be found here http://www.amazon.com/Orthodoxy-Catholicism-Comparison-Dave-Armstrong-ebook/dp/B00O145WDQ/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1437359352&sr=8-2&keywords=dave+armstrong+orthodoxy&pebp=1437359357607&perid=0EKAQ3KDG9PQFQXMQ4HD

Despite the claims of the one negative review given by the sort of bellicose Easterner that you often find on the internet, the book goes to great lengths to be fair and is in no way a raging polemic against Orthodoxy. You have to remember that when you learn something new you ultimately must contextualize it within what you already know, so trying to learn Western theology and philosophy apart from what you have taken from the East is making your goal that much harder to achieve.

Also I'm not convinced that you have to abandon the East wholesale. I suppose if you think there is a genuine temptation to jump ship to Orthodoxy you should avoid it, but if you really have gotten over your infatuation as you seem to suggest, then you probably aren't in any immediate danger.

I may have gotten over it for now, but I should probably mostly ignore it. Otherwise I'll get pulled back in. I've gone back and forth a few times over the past few years. And this flip flopping is not helping my spiritual growth and journey.
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#8
(07-19-2015, 11:08 PM)Farmer88 Wrote: I may have gotten over it for now, but I should probably mostly ignore it. Otherwise I'll get pulled back in. I've gone back and forth a few times over the past few years. And this flip flopping is not helping my spiritual growth and journey.

Is Eastern Catholicism not a viable option for you?
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#9
(07-20-2015, 03:31 PM)Melkite Wrote:
(07-19-2015, 11:08 PM)Farmer88 Wrote: I may have gotten over it for now, but I should probably mostly ignore it. Otherwise I'll get pulled back in. I've gone back and forth a few times over the past few years. And this flip flopping is not helping my spiritual growth and journey.

Is Eastern Catholicism not a viable option for you?

For now, I think it's very likely I'll get dragged back towards Orthodoxy. At least for now.
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#10
For an introductory look into Latin views of things, I'd go with Theology for Beginners and Theology & Sanity by Frank Sheed.
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