Avoid Using These 5 Toxic Cooking Oils
#1
http://refreshingnews99.blogspot.in/2015...-oils.html


July 22, 2015

Avoid Using These 5 Toxic Cooking Oils

Oil is considered a form of fat that you can incorporate in most dishes and is found in nearly all food items available on the market today. In this article, you will discover some of the oils, specifically polyunsaturated vegetable oils, you should not be using, especially not in large amounts.
According to research, because polyunsaturated vegetable oils are subjected to high levels of rancidity, they force the body to require more vitamin E and other types of antioxidants. Use of vegetable oils in excessive amounts can cause liver and reproductive organ damage that can ultimately lead to cancer.
Likewise, consumption of commercially-available vegetable oils in large amounts can cause PMS, sterility, as well as various autoimmune diseases.

5 Cooking Oils To Avoid


Canola Oil

Canola oil is one of the abundant sources of omega 6 polyunsaturated fatty acids or PUFA. Scientific evidence shows that this has counterproductive effects if consumed in large amounts. Some of its effects include cancer, diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure and various types of cardiovascular diseases. Other harmful manifestations of consuming this oil include tumor development, atherosclerosis, and hyperinsulinemia.


Corn Oil

Various corn oil brands are directly derived from genetically modified corn. Companies switch to corn GMOs because they believe that this has increased resistance to pesticides and herbicides. Relatively, corn oil from corn GMOs are new to animal and human diets. Therefore, the long-term and short-term effects of this oil are entirely unknown.
However, recent studies show that oil derived from GMO corn can cause toxicity to numerous organs like the heart, spleen, adrenal glands, kidneys, and liver.


Soybean Oil

Soybean oil has a chemical structure that’s enough to cause chaos and dysfunction for your cells. Studies show that this can cause reproductive system problems because soybean oil interferes with enzymes that make up sex hormones. Specifically, it blocks omega 3 fatty acids. Also, this can compromise your immune functions by reducing your HDL (good cholesterol) and increasing your LDL (bad cholesterol).


Peanut Oil

If you think peanut oil is good because it is “natural”, think again. For those who are carefully watching their weight, peanut oil is not really recommended and is actually one of the cooking oils to avoid because it contains a high amount of calories and is highly processed. In fact, one teaspoon of peanut oil contains a whopping 45 calories.


Sunflower Oil

Studies show that long-term consumption of sunflower oil can increase the risks of contracting different types of diseases. Each tablespoon of sunflower oil contains 120 calories. Therefore, this is not recommended for those who want to lose weight and those who have diabetes. It  contains phytosterols, which are compounds that increase the bad cholesterol while decreasing the good cholesterol. Also, sunflower oil can cause inflammatory reactions to take place. At the very least, this makes it a common culprit of cardiovascular problems if used on a long-term basis. It may also affect the white blood cell- and insulin-related functions in your body.
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#2
(07-23-2015, 09:53 AM)Zedta Wrote: Peanut Oil

If you think peanut oil is good because it is “natural”, think again. For those who are carefully watching their weight, peanut oil is not really recommended and is actually one of the cooking oils to avoid because it contains a high amount of calories and is highly processed. In fact, one teaspoon of peanut oil contains a whopping 45 calories.

Every oil has a whopping 40-45 calories per teaspoon, the every healthy olive oil included.

Every oil is a fat. Fat has 9 calories per gram. A teaspoon of oil is about 5 grams. 5 x 9 = 45. Every time.


(07-23-2015, 09:53 AM)Zedta Wrote: Sunflower Oil

Studies show that long-term consumption of sunflower oil can increase the risks of contracting different types of diseases. Each tablespoon of sunflower oil contains 120 calories. Therefore, this is not recommended for those who want to lose weight and those who have diabetes. It  contains phytosterols, which are compounds that increase the bad cholesterol while decreasing the good cholesterol. Also, sunflower oil can cause inflammatory reactions to take place. At the very least, this makes it a common culprit of cardiovascular problems if used on a long-term basis. It may also affect the white blood cell- and insulin-related functions in your body.

Every oil contains 120 calories per tablespoon. It's the same maths as above, except a tablespoon contains about 15 grams of oil. 15 x 9 = 120.
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#3
(07-23-2015, 10:44 PM)MagisterMusicae Wrote:
(07-23-2015, 09:53 AM)Zedta Wrote: Peanut Oil

If you think peanut oil is good because it is “natural”, think again. For those who are carefully watching their weight, peanut oil is not really recommended and is actually one of the cooking oils to avoid because it contains a high amount of calories and is highly processed. In fact, one teaspoon of peanut oil contains a whopping 45 calories.

Every oil has a whopping 40-45 calories per teaspoon, the every healthy olive oil included.

Every oil is a fat. Fat has 9 calories per gram. A teaspoon of oil is about 5 grams. 5 x 9 = 45. Every time.


(07-23-2015, 09:53 AM)Zedta Wrote: Sunflower Oil

Studies show that long-term consumption of sunflower oil can increase the risks of contracting different types of diseases. Each tablespoon of sunflower oil contains 120 calories. Therefore, this is not recommended for those who want to lose weight and those who have diabetes. It  contains phytosterols, which are compounds that increase the bad cholesterol while decreasing the good cholesterol. Also, sunflower oil can cause inflammatory reactions to take place. At the very least, this makes it a common culprit of cardiovascular problems if used on a long-term basis. It may also affect the white blood cell- and insulin-related functions in your body.

Every oil contains 120 calories per tablespoon. It's the same maths as above, except a tablespoon contains about 15 grams of oil. 15 x 9 = 120.

Ya your are quite correct and I am not stopping my use of peanut oil, nor olive oil  or even coconut oil for cooking because of calories. I drain my food well after cooking to minimize the added caloric intake. Perhaps the author does too? I don't know, at least from the article, what they do. But, its the other oils, the more uncommon, (until the middle of the last century) never seen before ones that are problematic for me. People didn't eat that stuff in such quantities, nor were some of them even in existence before then. Yet many of them ended up in our processed foods and in our kitchens. Hey, its from veggies...its gotta be good...right? Maybe not.

I think lard is fine to use too. It has a lot of saturated fat, but like bacon grease, has a lot of monounsaturated fats too, but requires lower cooking temperatures and therefore will have less trans fats. Its the high temps that produce the trans fats in the polyunsaturated or hydrogenated fats.

There has been a lot of lies about animal fats since the mid 1950s. I suppose it was to promote vegetable oils use. I recall when they took coconut oil out of the movie theater popcorn. It tasted soooo good! The health Nazis said it was a killer and now we know better. The lie didn't stand, but it remains in the culture even today.
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#4
(07-24-2015, 07:53 AM)Zedta Wrote: I think lard is fine to use too. It has a lot of saturated fat, but like bacon grease, has a lot of monounsaturated fats too, but requires lower cooking temperatures and therefore will have less trans fats. Its the high temps that produce the trans fats in the polyunsaturated or hydrogenated fats.

There has been a lot of lies about animal fats since the mid 1950s. I suppose it was to promote vegetable oils use. I recall when they took coconut oil out of the movie theater popcorn. It tasted soooo good! The health Nazis said it was a killer and now we know better. The lie didn't stand, but it remains in the culture even today.

Lard is great! It's a total waste even, to not use it in cooking. (What happens to all that lard after the animals are slaughtered, if not for cooking?) The calories obsession is a lie, too, recent research shows this whole 'low fat' nonsense is actually very unhealthy. Of course you shouldn't consume a lot of fat, duh. But who actually can and does? The body can only take so much fat, and it doesn't go unnoticed if you eat too much. (i.e. You get sick!) Americans are so weird about food sometimes, freaking out about the 'fattening' French diet, which is one of the healthiest cuisines on planet earth. Because adding a little cream to your soup isn't going to kill you, in fact, it's good for you. Anyway, I don't know if you've heard about the 'low-fat' sham, but if you come across an article on it, please post it. These lies have to stop.
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