mixed marriages
#1
What is the Church teaching on marriages between Catholics and Protestants? I thought I read somewhere against them but in practice they seem to get allowed? Anyone know?
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#2
They are allowed, but you must get a permission from your bishop.

I myself think its unwise--marriage is hard by itself without this fundamental disagreement on the (common) Good.
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#3
In actual practice, the tendency is not to raise the children of such unions in the Church, or in both religions, but rather to settle into the lowest common denominator of laxity, non-observance, and complete ignorance of matters of faith. Many practicing Catholics have fallen in love with and married practicing Protestants, only to compromise through irreligion. Inlaws might raise a ruckus if their son or daughter converts, but they seldom are as offended by a slip into laxity, so it is a very convenient and diplomatic solution to religious differences.

What do you call the child of a Catholic and a Protestant? An agnostic.

Tragically, many Protestants from conservative backgrounds, engaged to be married to Catholics, who attend a few RCIA classes are scared away. A woman in my family was laughed at by the deacon teaching  catechism for rejecting the evolutionary explanation of human origins, and was told that the Biblical account of creation was naive and contrary to science. She stopped going to RCIA because of that and opted to get a dispensation for mixed marriage instead.
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#4
(07-27-2015, 05:25 PM)little_flower10 Wrote: What is the Church teaching on marriages between Catholics and Protestants? I thought I read somewhere against them but in practice they seem to get allowed? Anyone know?

I recommend the section on matrimony in the Baltimore Catechism.  There are several questions and answers that address this very topic.  The questions and answers are true in theory, but they are not always put into practice very well.  For example.  Q. 1038. says, "What are the marriages of Catholics with persons of a different religion called, and when does the Church permit them by dispensation?  A. The marriages of Catholics with persons of a different religion are called mixed marriages. The Church permits them by dispensation only under certain conditions and for urgent reasons; chiefly to prevent a greater evil."  I know lots of Catholics whose spouses are not Catholic, or who have only one parent who is Catholic.  They marriages have been blessed by the Church, and no one seems to give the fact that one person isn't Catholic a second thought.  If you don't have a copy of the Baltimore Catechism, I suggest you get one.  In the meantime, here is a PDF version of it.

http://www.boston-catholic-journal.com/b...echism.pdf
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#5
The Church despises mixed marriage, plain and simple, because it puts the Faith of the Catholic involved and the children produced in avoidable danger.

Nevertheless, knowing that despite this, her children often do become attached to a non-Catholic, and fearing that if she did not provide some remedy, the Catholic might apostatize in order to "marry" civilly or in a non-Catholic sect, she will tollerate a mixed marriage under certain, very strict conditions.

Namely, the non-Catholic must promise that the children will be raised Catholic, he will not prohibit the spouse or children from Catholic religious practices, will not demand they attend false worship, etc.

These promises were necessary to obtain a dispensation from the local Ordinary for the impediment of disparity of cult, which would otherwise make the marriage null.

Even then, traditionally, the Church would not allow such a marriage to be celebrated in the Church in most cases. Typically the priest would witness the marriage on the Church steps, at the rectory, sometimes in the Church proper, but without any special vestments or adornments, in his black cassock, without ceremony, without music, without the nuptual blessing. It was a mere exchange of vows that was witnessed and registered, in order to show that the Church saw such a union as valid, but undesirable situation.

Obviously, the modern Church has gone to great lengths to undermine this very prudential and motherly care for her children. While dispensation is still needed, it is a mere formality, and no distinction is made to show the Church's reluctance.
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#6
(07-27-2015, 11:08 PM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: Namely, the non-Catholic must promise that the children will be raised Catholic, he will not prohibit the spouse or children from Catholic religious practices, will not demand they attend false worship, etc.

Not true since 1983:
CIC, 1983, Canon 1125 Wrote:1/ the Catholic party is to declare that he or she is prepared to remove dangers of defecting from the faith and is to make a sincere promise to do all in his or her power so that all offspring are baptized and brought up in the Catholic Church;

2/ the other party is to be informed at an appropriate time about the promises which the Catholic party is to make, in such a way that it is certain that he or she is truly aware of the promise and obligation of the Catholic party;
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#7
(07-28-2015, 09:12 AM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(07-27-2015, 11:08 PM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: Namely, the non-Catholic must promise that the children will be raised Catholic, he will not prohibit the spouse or children from Catholic religious practices, will not demand they attend false worship, etc.

Not true since 1983:
CIC, 1983, Canon 1125 Wrote:1/ the Catholic party is to declare that he or she is prepared to remove dangers of defecting from the faith and is to make a sincere promise to do all in his or her power so that all offspring are baptized and brought up in the Catholic Church;

2/ the other party is to be informed at an appropriate time about the promises which the Catholic party is to make, in such a way that it is certain that he or she is truly aware of the promise and obligation of the Catholic party;

You're right, legally, it is the Catholic that must now make the promises, and the non-Catholic must affirm he is aware of these promises and obligations.

The former discipline, however, accords perfectly well with the law, and any priest acting prudently would refuse to marry a couple where the non-Catholic party was not clear that he understood and agreed to the obligation. Granted, many priests don't act prudently ...
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#8
(07-27-2015, 06:42 PM)Cyriacus Wrote: In actual practice, the tendency is not to raise the children of such unions in the Church, or in both religions, but rather to settle into the lowest common denominator of laxity, non-observance, and complete ignorance of matters of faith.

I grew up in that house. Amen, I say, amen. I'm old enough that I was influenced by my Catholic  Grandmother before she passed. My brothers are not so fortunate.

I know far too many woman who married non-Catholics. It seems it's usually a Catholic wife and non-Catholic husband, I only know of 1 couple in my circle that's the other way around (vs. probably a dozen of the former).

The biggest issue right now, at least in NO Land, is the lack of solid, Catholic men.
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#9
Thanks for the reply! What would you do if someone close to you was moving towards such a marriage? Its confusing cause on one hand its valid under those given conditions on the other its discouraged.
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#10
It depends on the person. Some folks meet some evangelical or something before they revert, so in this case (especially when there's kids involved) its only reasonable to regulate one's situation, especially if the spouse is open to Catholicism (and especially if its the man who is strong Catholic, the wife will most likely follow).

But its a whole different story for the laodiceans, especially when there's no good reason (like children, etc.) to marry someone of another faith.

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