Mystery reliquary found under America’s first Protestant church
#1
How very interesting!

Perhaps he was a Spanish spy. They had been on the continent for many more years than the English. St. Augustine (established in the early 1500s) was in what is now Florida since pre-Jamestown years.

:comp:


Mystery reliquary found under America’s first Protestant church

http://www.catholicherald.co.uk/news/201...nt-church/

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A well-preserved silver box believed to be a Catholic reliquary is displayed at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History (PA)


Historians speculate that early settler leader could have been a Catholic spy

Historians have discovered four bodies and a mystery Catholic reliquary under the first English Protestant church in America.

In an extraordinary turn of events, graves have been discovered under what used to be the floor of America’s first Protestant church in Jamestown, Virginia – the church where Pocahontas married the English colonist John Rolfe.

The graves include the bodies of Captain William West, who was killed by Indians, Rev Robert Hunt, Jamestown’s first Anglican minister and Sir Ferdinando Wainman, the first English knight buried in America.

The grave of Captain Gabriel Archer, who died during the “starving time” when colonists were reduced to eating rats and even each other, has also been discovered.

On top of the captain’s coffin was a small silver box, marked with the letter “M”, which historians believe was a Catholic reliquary used for keeping the bones of saints.

A CT scan revealed that the box contained what looks like seven human bone fragments and a lead vial for blood or holy water.

The four graves were discovered in 2013 and historians have been working ever since to identify the graves.

The identities of the dead were announced at the National Museum of Natural History in Washington.

One theory behind the discovery is that Captain Archer’s parents in England were recusants and historians think it is possible that the captain was a Catholic spy working for the Spanish who was executed by the English.

Alternatively, the box could have simply been a Catholic remnant that had been adopted by Jamestown’s Protestant church.
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#2
I'm not really much of a fan of archaeologists disturbing graves, especially those of Christians. Some of these men are the ancestors of many Americans, and their physical remains would be better in Christian graves than sitting in drawers in archival storage.
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#3
(07-30-2015, 12:25 PM)Cyriacus Wrote: I'm not really much of a fan of archaeologists disturbing graves, especially those of Christians. Some of these men are the ancestors of many Americans, and their physical remains would be better in Christian graves than sitting in drawers in archival storage.

When you think about it archaeology is nothing but glorified tomb robbing. I took several Mediterranean archaeology courses (upper level courses, not the stuff you see commonly taught at community colleges that is simple and "dumbed" down) and studied an archaeological collection with a professor; I always thought it was important to study our ancestors and the "garbage" they left behind. The major issue I have with archaeology is there is little respect for the deceased; human bones are kept in boxes or crates in storage for decades-maybe even hundreds of years-and they usually are never reburied. Most archaeologists are quite liberal and modernist; often they project their own biases or anachronisms on ancient humans that are simply not true by our standards (EX. the "universal mother earth goddess" or that LGBTQRSTUV activists will state that homosexual behaviors were widely accepted by all ancient societies).

I think if grave goods or burials are going to be disturbed, they should be dug up, studied for a certain period of time, then be reburied in the same manner. I suppose this makes me "unorthodox" in my archaeology. I don't think archaeology should be a disregarded science, but our ancestors-especially those of Christians-should be disturbed as little as possible and be reburied when the field work has been done. Honestly, I would love to see these ancient Christian Churches in the Mediterranean and the Middle East be conserved, rebuilt, and used again for worship.

To get back to the subject though, I found this find at Jamestown rather interesting. Enjoy!



Our faith isn't something that is dead and belongs in a museum. Our faith is a living faith!
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#4
By the way here is a fascinating video of the discovery of the reliquary and the 4 men buried:




Listening to Dr. Owsley was sort of annoying though: '...some of the most amazing discoveries in my career." I admit it's amazing but these 4 men should be respected and seen as people, even in death. Hopefully they will be reburied instead of sitting in boxes in storage and forgotten.
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#5
Here are more videos pertaining to the reliquary box and the burials:














....also, here is another video (Jamestown related) in which apparently a Jesuit ring was found. Surprised by Catholics in Jamestown? We're everywhere. :)

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#6
(07-30-2015, 07:41 PM)Sequentia Wrote: [...] homosexual behaviors were widely accepted by all ancient societies.

This is true, but they leave out that it happened just before the fall of said societies.

(07-30-2015, 07:41 PM)Sequentia Wrote: I think if grave goods or burials are going to be disturbed, they should be dug up, studied for a certain period of time, then be reburied in the same manner.

Yes, as we 'try' to do here in the states with Native American remains found in burial mounds and such. Sadly it is so common that the tribes have had to develop ceremonies for just such an occasion.
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