Special REcipes
#1
Brodo Apostolorum;

Pius V was elected to the papacy in 1566. He was a Dominican, who allowed no luxury for himself. Even under his papal robes he wore his rough habit and walked barefoot. This soup in the cookbook of Scappi, the papal chef of the time, was well-suited to this pontiff. This is a watery soup of parsley and herbs, blending nourishment and sanctity. This is exactly how it was written in 1550. You can adjust the meat stock to more readily available ingredients of the day.


DIRECTIONS
To make a soup of parsley and other herbs used in the court of Rome.

Take some meat stock, in which you have boiled brain sausages, pigs' throats and spine of mutton, and which is tinged with saffron mixed with pepper and cinnamon — in the summertime, add to this whole gooseberries or verjuice. When this is cooked, take well-scrubbed and washed parsley and other herbs and chop finely to add to this broth; as soon as it returns to the boil, serve immediately with slices of bread in bowls, along with the meat divided up. Note that this soup should not be kept, as the parsley quickly loses its color; note also that this dish is served in summertime in Rome, and is accompanied also by grated cheese and beaten egg.

http://www.catholicculture.org/culture/l...fm?id=1494
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#2
This recipe from the Umbria region of Italy is served on the feast day of St. Francis. It is supposedly one of the few foods that St. Francis let himself really enjoyed. The recipe, according to tradition, originated with St. Clare. This is the tradition of a biscotti, a twice-baked sweetened bread.


DIRECTIONS
Cream butter, sugar and eggs. Add the other ingredients and knead until smooth. Form 2 rolls about 1 inch (3 cm) diameter.

Bake in a preheated moderately hot oven 375°F for 10 to 12 minutes until golden brown.

When cool, cut into slices 3/4 inch (2 cm) thick, and toast in the oven for 3 minutes.

http://www.catholicculture.org/culture/l...fm?id=1288
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#3
Would St. Francis and St. Clare really have eaten cane sugar? It was an exotic, expensive commodity that had to be imported from abroad; the trade network was run mostly by Arab Muslims and Jews, although there was a Venetian trade during the era of the Crusades. Other sweeteners, like honey, were available and had a more prominent presence in medieval cookery.
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#4
(08-11-2015, 06:27 AM)Cyriacus Wrote: Would St. Francis and St. Clare really have eaten cane sugar? It was an exotic, expensive commodity that had to be imported from abroad; the trade network was run mostly by Arab Muslims and Jews, although there was a Venetian trade during the era of the Crusades. Other sweeteners, like honey, were available and had a more prominent presence in medieval cookery.

Cyriacus, you're undoubtedly right. I'm sure the recipe has been 'updated' for convenience and expense. Somehow, cane sugar  in the 13th century doesn't strike me as compatible with a love of Lady Poverty.
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#5
(08-11-2015, 06:27 AM)Cyriacus Wrote: Would St. Francis and St. Clare really have eaten cane sugar? It was an exotic, expensive commodity that had to be imported from abroad; the trade network was run mostly by Arab Muslims and Jews, although there was a Venetian trade during the era of the Crusades. Other sweeteners, like honey, were available and had a more prominent presence in medieval cookery.
How about substituting honey for cane suger?
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#6
INGREDIENTS
1 pound kielbasa sausage, cut into 1 inch pieces
1 tablespoon butter
1 (14 ounce) can beef broth
1 (10.75 ounce) can tomato soup
1 1/2 cups water
3 cups shredded cabbage
1 onion, chopped
1/2 cup diced green bell pepper
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/4 cup sour cream

DIRECTIONS
In a large saucepan over medium heat, cook sausage in butter until brown. Pour broth, tomato soup and water into pan with sausage. Stir in cabbage, onion and bell pepper and season with salt and pepper. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer 45 minutes, or until flavors are well blended. Stir in sour cream and heat through before serving.

http://www.catholicculture.org/culture/l...fm?id=1651
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#7
(08-14-2015, 02:32 AM)Poche Wrote: INGREDIENTS
1 pound kielbasa sausage, cut into 1 inch pieces
1 tablespoon butter
1 (14 ounce) can beef broth
1 (10.75 ounce) can tomato soup
1 1/2 cups water
3 cups shredded cabbage
1 onion, chopped
1/2 cup diced green bell pepper
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/4 cup sour cream

DIRECTIONS
In a large saucepan over medium heat, cook sausage in butter until brown. Pour broth, tomato soup and water into pan with sausage. Stir in cabbage, onion and bell pepper and season with salt and pepper. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer 45 minutes, or until flavors are well blended. Stir in sour cream and heat through before serving.

http://www.catholic culture.org/culture/liturgicalyear/recipes/view.cfm?id=1651

Poche, what do they call this? Sounds like Russian щи, but I've never heard of putting tomatoes or tomato soup in it.
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#8
(08-14-2015, 03:55 AM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(08-14-2015, 02:32 AM)Poche Wrote: INGREDIENTS
1 pound kielbasa sausage, cut into 1 inch pieces
1 tablespoon butter
1 (14 ounce) can beef broth
1 (10.75 ounce) can tomato soup
1 1/2 cups water
3 cups shredded cabbage
1 onion, chopped
1/2 cup diced green bell pepper
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/4 cup sour cream

DIRECTIONS
In a large saucepan over medium heat, cook sausage in butter until brown. Pour broth, tomato soup and water into pan with sausage. Stir in cabbage, onion and bell pepper and season with salt and pepper. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer 45 minutes, or until flavors are well blended. Stir in sour cream and heat through before serving.

http://www.catholic culture.org/culture/liturgicalyear/recipes/view.cfm?id=1651

Poche, what do they call this? Sounds like Russian щи, but I've never heard of putting tomatoes or tomato soup in it.

Kielbasa Stew
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#9
Baked Cod, also Called: Bacalhao Fresco a Portuguesa



1 medium eggplant, cut in 6 even slices
1/4 cup olive oil
3 large onions, sliced
3 tablespoons capers, drained
1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds, crushed
1 cup raw rice
3-3 1/2 pounds fresh codfish
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1/4 teaspoon paprika
4 medium-sized tomatoes, peeled, chopped
2 cloves
1/2 cup water
3 tablespoons lemon juice
2 tablespoons butter

DIRECTIONS
Sauté eggplant in hot olive oil in skillet, about 3 minutes on each side. Place in oval baking dish. Sauté onions in same oil used for eggplant. Separate into rings. Cook until tender but not brown. Mix capers and cumin seeds with rice.

Spread layer of onion rings over eggplant slices. Spread layer of rice over onions.

Clean cod. Split lengthwise, remove bones. Rub fish with salt, pepper, and paprika. Place cod over layer of rice. Add tomatoes and cloves. Pour water over all layers. Sprinkle with lemon juice. Dot with butter. Cover baking dish. Bake 30 minutes at 375°. Uncover. Bake 10-15 minutes longer. Serve very hot.

http://www.catholicculture.org/culture/l...fm?id=1097
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#10
INGREDIENTS
2 pounds cottage cheese
1 1/4 cups sugar
2 cups honey
8 eggs, beaten
5 pastry sheets (Phyllo)
2 tablespoons ground cinnamon

DIRECTIONS
Mix cottage cheese and sugar in large bowl. Add honey. Blend. Add eggs. Mix thoroughly. Line bottom of baking pan with 5 pastry sheets, one on top of the other, making certain to oil each sheet to prevent sticking. Spread cottage-cheese mixture on pastry sheets. Bake 35 minutes at 350° until golden brown. Sprinkle with cinnamon. Cool. Cut in squares or diamonds to serve. Yield, 2 dozen

http://www.catholicculture.org/culture/l...fm?id=1041
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