Catholicism and Nursing
#1


Came across this in a book at the museum I volunteer at. The name of the book is "Nursing: The Finest Art: An Illustrated History." It was written by M. Patrician Donahue, Ph.D., R.N.  Here's a bad scan of the juicy part. I had to show it to you guys:


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#2
(08-31-2015, 08:37 PM)Vox Clamantis Wrote: Came across this in a book at the museum I volunteer at. The name of the book is "Nursing: The Finest Art: An Illustrated History." It was written by M. Patrician Donahue, Ph.D., R.N.  Here's a bad scan of the juicy part. I had to show it to you guys:


[Image: nursing1.jpg]

[Image: nursing2.jpg]

Fascinating! I'm in health care, everyone I know and associate with is in healthcare and thus hospitals and health related things are fascinating to me. Wouldn't mind reading this whole book.
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#3
Very cool. i read a book not too long ago that touched on that, how the hospitals pre-Reformation were actually pretty good, and were horrible after until the late 19th century.
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#4
This is fascinating. Does anyone know if any recent scholarship has been on Catholic Pre-Reformation healthcare? Considering healthcare is such a hot topic these days, it would be good to look into it and discuss.
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#5
Some time ago I read a few pages from a scholarly book on economics in the 16th century. The author argued that Protestantism in general and Henry VIII in particular waged war on the guilds, thereby destroying the medieval social-economic fabric. Sounds like the standard Marxist narrative on capitalist bourgeoisie replacing feudalist aristocracy, but seemed to me pretty well argued. However I have forget title and author...
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#6
There's a section in the book "The 13th, The Greatest of Centuries" about the medieval hospitals and the kind of care received and how that changed with the Reformation.  Hospitals were pretty much funded by rich nobles and the Church and staffed by monks, nuns and other volunteers. It's said that folds used to walk the streets looking for people who needed help. It's a far cry from that today.
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#7
Fascinating . I would love to read her book in its entirety.

It is so true, how the money ethic has replaced the care ethic to where we actually have 'proprietary' hospitals and even chains of them, like HCA. For me, proprietary and hospital shouldn't be used in the same sentence. Then of course there are the non-profits which act quite similarly  money hungry and the fading not-for-profits which are practically all the same. Most of the diocesan funded hospitals are but a sad memory.

I am so glad I am no longer practicing. What a mess it has become, health care is almost an oxymoron.
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