Breaking Eucharistic fast?
#1
In regards to breaking the Eucharistic fast do we need to physically put something in our mouth and swallow it for it to count as breaking it? I keep feeling scrupulous in regards to it. Sometimes I found myself getting emotional in the sense of weeping before Mass and thus getting a running nose as a consequence and sometimes by accident I swallow something (I don't want to be too graphic) but this really has been a sort of scruples for me. I know I obviously have no intention in breaking the fast and am not purposely physically trying to eat and break the fast.
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#2
Quite simply, you are being scrupulous. You are not breaking the fast! Don't worry about it!
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#3
Wait a minute. He might be on to something here. We know human saliva is only about 99.5% water. So, if we swallow saliva we are actually breaking the fast!!
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#4
A Muslim guy at work told me that during Ramadan it actually does break the fast to swallow your own saliva. In Catholicism that's just bravado, scrupulosity or both. If I were you I'd be strict with yourself but never scrupulous. Always err on the side of mercy...but not too much. It's a fine line.
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#5
(10-09-2015, 09:49 PM)formerbuddhist Wrote: A Muslim guy at work told me that during Ramadan it actually does break the fast to swallow your own saliva. In Catholicism that's just bravado, scrupulosity or both. If I were you I'd be strict with yourself but never scrupulous. Always err on the side of mercy...but not too much. It's a fine line.

LOL. Maybe that's why they are always at war. At the heat of the middle east, north Africa and Arabia they can't even swallow saliva.

In Catholicism this is plain silly. This sounds more like something rabbis would debate on some obscure treatise.
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#6
(10-09-2015, 09:44 PM)Renatus Frater Wrote: Wait a minute. He might be on to something here. We know human saliva is only about 99.5% water. So, if we swallow saliva we are actually breaking the fast!!

From EWTN:
Quote:The Eucharistic fast is before Holy Communion, not the  Mass. It is a fast from food and drink, water is alright, as is medicine. The moral theology tradition teaches that to be food it must be a) edible, b) taken by mouth, and  c) swallowed. In addition to breakfast, lunch and dinner, candies, breath mints, lozanges and anything that is put into the mouth to be dissolved or chewed meets these conditions once the dissolved contents are swallowed. Chewing gum does not break the fast, but it is disrespectful of the Sacred Liturgy and once the juice is swallowed the fast is broken. The tradition also teaches that the fast is strict - one hour, that is, 60 minutes. Given that until recently the fast was from midnight, this seems very little to ask of Catholics.
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#7
From http://mission.liguori.org/newsletters/scrupulosity.htm:

"You shall not worry about breaking your fast before receiving communion, unless you actually put food and drink in your mouth and swallow it in the same way that a person does when eating a meal.

Much of the anxiety that is present in reference to breaking your fast before communion centers around extraneous matters. It is helpful to remember that lipstick is not food. Snowflakes are not food. You cannot break your fast unless you deliberately choose to eat in the same way that you would choose to eat a meal or a snack. The commandment clearly suggests that no hesitations are allowed regarding accidental swallowing of things that are not considered food."

A perspective that may help you is to think of it in the context of Lent. You don't fast from your prescribed medications during Lent, nor saliva, nor mucus, nor chapstick/lip balm that may touch your tongue. Those are all incidental things that just happen sometimes, or things we utilize to keep us healthy. :)

Please remember the words of Our Lord in the Divine Mercy vision given to St. Faustina: "I wish to heal it [mankind], pressing it to my merciful heart."
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#8
Here is the exact quote I was referencing:

"I do not want to punish aching mankind but I desire to heal it pressing it to My merciful heart...” (Diary 1588)
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#9
AMDG

Kind of related, I suppose . . .

My daughter asked a priest once if it broke her fast to wear chapstick to mass and then, inadvertently consume it when she licks her lips during mass.  His answer was "definitely not." 

Then she asked him if it would be if it were a flavored chap stick and she only wore it b/c she liked the flavor and licked her lips so that she could enjoy the flavor during mass.  He laughed and said she should not wear the flavored chapstick to mass because it was deliberately placing a distraction before herself during mass. 

She was quite young at the time.
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#10
boogers are not food

we keep telling my son this, but it never sinks in
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