What is the purpose of head covering?
#1
I was partially curious because of the veiling thread, but also curious because I don't know the theological reason behind it. I've heard of these being the reasons why women cover in Mass:

1. Submission to men
2. Women cover because of the angels
3. Out of reverence for the Eucharist
4. Because a woman's hair is pretty and should be kept covered

Which is it? Do any of these fit the bill? I've been reading up on this for a while but can't find a clear answer. What I've mainly read says it's because it shows a woman is submissive to a man (priest, husband, father), and it's because a woman's hair is a distraction for men in Mass. And yes, I've read men saying that it was a distraction for them.
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#2
On the "Being Catholic" section of this website, there is a good explanation of Catholic veiling. You should check it out! It helped me a lot when I started veiling and started getting a lot of questions from people.
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#3
I once heard a sister say that women are veiled because they are particularly sacred.  It was by woman that God became incarnate.  They are, for that reason, particularly sacred.  She compared the reasons for veiling to the reasons for veiling the tabernacle and chalice.
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#4
(10-24-2015, 09:20 PM)Credidi Propter Wrote: I once heard a sister say that women are veiled because they are particularly sacred.  It was by woman that God became incarnate.  They are, for that reason, particularly sacred.  She compared the reasons for veiling to the reasons for veiling the tabernacle and chalice.

This was a really good comparison. Sometimes what I've seen about veiling involves a lot of modern day angst, imo. It distracts from the real reasons for veiling.

Then there are the "tissue" horror stories I've read about, too.
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#5
Frankly, to me, the notion that women are "particularly sacred" compared to men stinks of tired Victorian sentimentalism in which men are seen as essentially worldly and fleshly, whereas women are seen as otherworldly and spiritual, which is really not a Biblical or a Catholic understanding.

How do we fit the idea that women should cover themselves, because of their particular sacredness, with what St. Paul says in 1 Corinthians, telling men that they should not pray with their heads covered because of the spiritual signification of man?

Quote:The man indeed ought not to cover his head, because he is the image and glory of God; but the woman is the glory of the man.

If women are veiled because of a certain sacredness that women possess in their womanhood that is not possessed by men in their manhood, how does that mesh with man as the glory of God vs. woman as the glory of man being somehow related to veiling?

Perhaps a better way to relate it would be to say that the nobility of woman was fulfilled in the Blessed Virgin Mary's role as the tabernacle of the Incarnation, and that women participate in this spiritual dignity and role, following the Virgin. Men, though, rather than lacking a sort of sacredness, go uncovered because the Son became incarnate as man, being the true and visible God. Because the image of God was made manifest in man, the hidden becoming revealed in the incarnation, man is called to pray uncovered as a testimony of God's taking flesh and living among us visibly as a man.

The men among the Jews, who reject the Incarnation and cannot conceive of God taking flesh and dwelling visibly among them, continue to cover their heads when they pray, signifying the veils that continue to cover their spiritual eyes and their denial that God could ever take human nature.
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#6
Vox deals with it quite extensively in the FE page on veiling: http://www.fisheaters.com/theveil.html

Its not either/or but both/and--like many other things in the Liturgy, the purpose and symbolism is manifold.
Cyriacus, I don't take it to mean men lack sacredness or women cannot be particularly profane, but its undeniably a different kind of sacredness (as, of course, we would expect, if we are not silly gender theorist moderns).
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#7
(10-25-2015, 09:26 AM)Renatus Frater Wrote: Vox deals with it quite extensively in the FE page on veiling: http://www.fisheaters.com/theveil.html

Its not either/or but both/and--like many other things in the Liturgy, the purpose and symbolism is manifold.
Cyriacus, I don't take it to mean men lack sacredness or women cannot be particularly profane, but its undeniably a different kind of sacredness (as, of course, we would expect, if we are not silly gender theorist moderns).

What he said. Ultimately, it was Vox's page on this topic that "sold" me on it.

Mary was the literally the Ark of the New Covenant. The Ark is veiled. I am wanting to imitate Mary. Therefore, I veil.
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#8
(10-25-2015, 04:56 AM)Cyriacus Wrote: Perhaps a better way to relate it would be to say that the nobility of woman was fulfilled in the Blessed Virgin Mary's role as the tabernacle of the Incarnation, and that women participate in this spiritual dignity and role, following the Virgin.

How does this relate to the ideas surrounding headcovering with submission, the beauty of hair, and out of respect for the angels?
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#9
(10-24-2015, 03:24 PM)introvert Wrote: I was partially curious because of the veiling thread, but also curious because I don't know the theological reason behind it. I've heard of these being the reasons why women cover in Mass:

1. Submission to men
2. Women cover because of the angels
3. Out of reverence for the Eucharist
4. Because a woman's hair is pretty and should be kept covered

Which is it? Do any of these fit the bill? I've been reading up on this for a while but can't find a clear answer. What I've mainly read says it's because it shows a woman is submissive to a man (priest, husband, father), and it's because a woman's hair is a distraction for men in Mass. And yes, I've read men saying that it was a distraction for them.

AMDG

Yeah, that's pretty much what I had always heard and as a consequence, never truly felt converted to the veil . . . until I heard this sermon.  Now I am a believer!

If you listen to this, please note: 
The first half to 2/3 is about the theological significance of veiling in general with the last bit is veiling for women in particular.  It is important to listen to all of the sermon.  Everything he says is connected and it all comes together.  You have to listen to all of it and get the part about veiling a crucifix or altarpiece or chalice to get it about a woman veiling.

I hope it helps you.
http://www.audiosancto.org/sermon/200903...iling.html
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#10
AMDG

So, as I said, thanks to Father's sermon, I am utterly converted to the veil.  I'm new to it though and have another to piggieback onto introvert's:

I understand the appropriate time to veil is "in the presence of Christ." Would that include receiving all the sacraments? Any time Fr is in persona Christi?
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