Europe: The Muslims are not to blame.
#1
Yesterday my husband read an article in which some exiled Austrian nobleman was commentating on the current situation in Europe. (We're talking about the migrant crisis, not the financial one, which is almost eclipsed by the other now.) I have forgotten his name, but he has a brilliant insight into the situation. He said that the problem is not that these migrants are Muslims, the problem is that the churches here are empty. I'm sure a lot of you have realized that on your own, but I still think it's worth repeating.

This touches on something even deeper in the German-speaking nations (Austria and Germany). Not only are the churches empty here, the whole culture is empty. There's already an integration problem because there is nothing to integrate into. I have experienced this myself, and the demotivating and unrewarding efforts of trying to belong to this society. The 'ghost of Hitler' has these countries paralyzed. Meanwhile, in the gaping hole where a culture should be, other stuff is moving in. Including US phenomena, like Halloween, which is just so out-of-place and insincere here. I see the decorations and candy for sale, which even a couple years wasn't as everywhere as it is now, and I can't help but think: 'Can you guys make your own culture?' Meanwhile those few who don't join in the pathetic half-assed Austrian version and complain about it as an 'invasion' aren't doing much to up-hold their own customs, preferring to play victim, or withhold them lest they 'offend' the 'refugees'. (Remember, masochism originates from here....) It makes it hard to sympathize with these people, honestly. However, I do see this a security threat to the world, so I think the other nations should be concerned. Because it's donuts today, niqabs tomorrow.

By the way, I could be thrown into jail here if I said any of this public. Which is why I will be leaving this place in a few years to return to the US. If anyone is interested in my observations about the differences between European and American Muslims, I'd be happy to share it.
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#2
Here some people also commemorate Halloween, which is just so utterly ridiculous—still, yet only college people and adults use it as an excuse for parties and for dressing even more lamentably.
What I find yet even sillier is the adoption of American styled democracy and filthy ideologies, you know, from classical liberalism to absolute freedom of expression to demonic stuff like feminism and gender ideology (though, to be fair, America is not the only entity to be blamed, after all, Gramsci was Italian, de Beauvoir French, Marx Jewish and, of course, there was that sweet, sweet Soviet money that was quite decisive on some decades).

At the end of the day this is a battle every nation is fighting and most are losing. Even our “conservatives” are of a definite American flavor, so they are no more conservatives than your typical liberal Scalia—really, and this is quite sad to admit, even our royal house, the legitimate heir to the throne, cannot bring himself to say democracy is bad and cowardly claims power comes from the people.
We will never see throne and altar again. Not until the Mohammedans dominate us for a couple of centuries, and then some strong Matamoros can enter the scene.

Of course, this is speaking humanly. We can always pray. Indeed, I personally believe some nations are holding on stronger than others through sheer prayer. Only Our Lady can destroy the heresies and Islam, and only the Sacred Heart can inflame people's devotions.
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#3
I live in the middle east and from here it looks as though the west is well and truly in material and moral decline.
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#4
To be fair, though, I don't think Muslims can say much about morals.
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#5
In a sense, the culture of a people flows from their religious practices. Many of these nations had cultures that extended back to pre-Christian times, but when the Church came along, they took some of the good pagan traditions in Europe and baptized them. As such those traditions still were able to flourish, but also grew and expanded in a Catholic sense. Many celebrations, feasts, traditions, etc. revolve around religious practice especially that of the Church's calendar.  Secularism and globalism devolve culture to become bland and defunct.  To the extent that culture survives in much of Europe, it's a shell of its former self. Mainly degrading to the point where feasts are more about debauchery than their original purpose and tradition has become a bad word. Much of the western world has adopted a detached secularized culture.
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#6
Well that's not quite true. I feel much safer here than in most of Europe. I find people here courteous and respectful especially to the old and young.

Not all of the locals are running around shouting Allahu Akbar and chopping off heads!

That doesn't make Islam right, but it does suggest that there are many good things that could yet come from the East.

Remember the star that once heralded the birth of the new born saviour and that was followed by the three wise men was in the East.
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#7
If the churches were full and there was an orthodox hierarchy and a populace still living pious lives according to the liturgical calendar muslims wouldn't be a problem because they would never have been allowed to settle in Europe in the first place.

To me it's undeniable, we are literally living in a time where Christianity is visibly drawing it's last breath and fading into the dustbin of history. A handful of us will carry on until we too end up in the grave but quite frankly it's just not convincing to most people anymore, and for the most part neither the hierarchy of the various Orthodox churches ( Orthodoxy, especially in the West,is rapidly liberalizing) or the Catholic Church are doing much to change that. 

There are some like me that, like the Old Believers of yesterday,try desperately to hold on to something that is dying and fading away,and that we as individuals have no real power to stop.  We can only keep praying, keep living the cycles of the liturgical year that only wierdos and historians know anything about and hope that our faith is well placed in the end.

Christianity will survive in pockets here and there for awhile, but in Europe it's as good as dead. It's sad but it is what it is. We are living at a momentous period in history when this great religious tradition is literally dying, being destroyed from without by invaders and alien ideas, and within by false shepherds who don't really believe.


Christ promised that the gates of hell would not prevail against the Church, but never promised the Church would remain visible in Western Europe,or that it would be easily recognized. In fact He even asked rhetorically whether he'd find faith on earth when He returned. The remnant will be few.
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#8
I remember when I was younger, I would have great doubts caused by the fact that so many people in the world did not believe. I'd say, how can all of these people be wrong? I think that as I've grown more in faith and in knowledge of the faith, that has faded to where I see the smallness that approaches us almost as a sign of truth. The Lord asked whether he'd find faith on earth when He returned. I ask, are we approaching that time?

I don't know if it will happen in my lifetime, but I also wonder at what is to become of the Church until the time the Lord returns, seeing what's happening today. There will always be a remnant, how small will it be? Once the baby boomers start to go, the numbers of the mainstream will dwindle even more. The baby boomer generation was extremely poorly catechized. A large percentage priests of that generation are just awful. In a way, they're different from "Generation X" and the "Millennial Generation" because of the fact that those generations didn't stick around when they disagreed with the Church. Whereas the revolutionary generation of baby boomers said, "I disagree, but I'll change it." In a way, it will be a purging of the Church.

When I look at these generations, I still see many people who call themselves Christians, but they surely don't follow Christ. Catholics who never go to Mass, who disagree with Church teachings, and surely don't live in a way that's any different than the rest of the world. Protestants fall into the same boat. They always say "Jesus" "Jesus" "Jesus" but they then live like the rest of the world in all its evils.

If things continue to play out, you'll have these younger and hopefully more devout priests remaining. However, the number of priests and faithful will be much smaller. The number of churches will be lessened. Christianity will be purged from the public sphere. Only at this time will thing begin to turn around. Will the Church ever regain the majesty (in a worldly sense) of the past? Maybe not.  Maybe it doesn't need to. Will we ever see a time when the churches are overfilling and vocations are through the roof? Who knows? Short of divine intervention, it's going to be a long road ahead for the Church. We all may not even be around to see it come to fruition.
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#9
(10-27-2015, 04:17 PM)GangGreen Wrote: I remember when I was younger, I would have great doubts caused by the fact that so many people in the world did not believe. I'd say, how can all of these people be wrong? I think that as I've grown more in faith and in knowledge of the faith, that has faded to where I see the smallness that approaches us almost as a sign of truth. The Lord asked whether he'd find faith on earth when He returned. I ask, are we approaching that time?

I don't know if it will happen in my lifetime, but I also wonder at what is to become of the Church until the time the Lord returns, seeing what's happening today. There will always be a remnant, how small will it be? Once the baby boomers start to go, the numbers of the mainstream will dwindle even more. The baby boomer generation was extremely poorly catechized. A large percentage priests of that generation are just awful. In a way, they're different from "Generation X" and the "Millennial Generation" because of the fact that those generations didn't stick around when they disagreed with the Church. Whereas the revolutionary generation of baby boomers said, "I disagree, but I'll change it." In a way, it will be a purging of the Church.

When I look at these generations, I still see many people who call themselves Christians, but they surely don't follow Christ. Catholics who never go to Mass, who disagree with Church teachings, and surely don't live in a way that's any different than the rest of the world. Protestants fall into the same boat. They always say "Jesus" "Jesus" "Jesus" but they then live like the rest of the world in all its evils.

If things continue to play out, you'll have these younger and hopefully more devout priests remaining. However, the number of priests and faithful will be much smaller. The number of churches will be lessened. Christianity will be purged from the public sphere. Only at this time will thing begin to turn around. Will the Church ever regain the majesty (in a worldly sense) of the past? Maybe not.  Maybe it doesn't need to. Will we ever see a time when the churches are overfilling and vocations are through the roof? Who knows? Short of divine intervention, it's going to be a long road ahead for the Church. We all may not even be around to see it come to fruition.


Just today I was looking at some documents on the Old Believers in Lithuania and just felt saddened by the starkness of things regarding them, and also regarding our own Church. In Lithuania there are all these beautiful old churches, but most are rotting plundered remains of a dead faith and culture surrounded by overgrown cemeteries populated by countless souls who lived and died for something no one believes in anymore. Old Believers were ultra insular and conservative and even they could not eventually keep from Hemmoraging  and practically dying out. I suppose Rod Drehers Benedict Option would probably lead to a future not unlike Lithuania's Old Believers.

And what of the mainstream church's? They are faring no better, either in Europe or the USA. Trads are part of a subculture that is still pretty much not reflective of the mainstream Catholic culture today almost anywhere, including at the level of the papacy.

Quite simply Roman Catholic traditionalism is not much different in some ways than the Old Believer schism where pretentious hierarchs ( Patriarch Nikon or, Pius XII, Paul VI) tinkered with immemorial traditions and customs forced people to either accept the changes or break away and form a parallel ecclesial society at odds with the mainstream.

Honest if if wasn't for Ecclesia Dei or Summorum Pontificum Roman Catholic traditionalism would be a the haunt of only those outside of the canonical boundaries of the Church. Like the Old Believers this insular attitude eventually leads to rigidity, fragmentation and eventual dissolution, and yet, like the Old Believers I think the traditional Catholic is largely correct in standing against novelty even if it's foisted on the faithful from the episcopate.

Time will tell what will happen. All I know is that I do not think there will ever be a time this side of the Second Coming when the Church will look and operate as it did in the Middle Ages or at the end of the Pius XII era. The era of the seige mentality Church is over. We are scattered,we have the communion of saints and the old ways but few shepherds. Let each one of us be able to say " yes" to our Lord when He asks if we kept the Faith, even if in our lifetime we see a Church that for all intents and purposes appears to be on life support and fading fast.

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#10
It might have to do with the fact no one's having babies. The religious aren't having enough children to even continue their own communities.
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