Traddies, are you putting back some food?
#1
What with the way the world is going, I think it's important to lay some back in case things get worse. I hate to sound negative, but it seems realistic to say things will go further south--and soon.

Now I know that if (really when) something really bad happens, something we can't survive, our spiritual preparedness is of primary importance. Staying close to Our Lord in a state of grace is the primary way in which we prepare. So that comes first.

But if there's a survivable worst case scenario in my future, then I want to be able to feed myself and my loved ones.

A lot of people are struggling financially these days, but hopefully if one keeps the plan very simple, say mostly rice and beans--those sorts of inexpensive foods, it's not impossible. And keep in mind that the price of food will only go up, so having some put back is an investment.

The clip below is put out by a Mormon lady, Wendy DeWitt. I know Mormonism is a false religion, but as far as food storage goes, they do know a lot. I like (and use) Wendy's approach because her system isn't about blindly pulling whatever off the shelves at the supermarket and wasting money on things you won't need. She has a very well thought out system which I find helpful because I'm not at all good at organizing such things. So, I put this out here in case it's helpful to you, too!

http://everythingunderthesunblog.blogspot.com/

"Not only are we all in the same boat, but we are all seasick.” --G.K. Chesterton
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#2
I should add: the one thing I don't like about her system is she advises you stock up on shortening, which is hydrogenated vegetable oil. Now, in a total all-out zombie apocalypse scenario, yes it will keep forever, but if the zombies don't kill you, the crisco will!

So, if you  watch your rotation, it's better to use the coconut oil or olive oil, both of which you can keep for about two years.

That said, I do use crisco to season my cast iron pots and pans. Works great!
"Not only are we all in the same boat, but we are all seasick.” --G.K. Chesterton
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#3
I'm not but my parents definitely are, and they are not practicing Catholics. My dad buys all sorts of odd stuff but he also has a "green thumb." I have tried growing edible things such as oyster mushrooms but I ultimately fail in the end. My mushrooms never grow, and mushrooms are good at growing! :( My parents have a small greenhouse, growing all sorts of things throughout the whole year...crops that I don't even know the names of. They grow basic things such as green beans, tomatoes, egg plant, brussel sprouts, peppers, peas, lettuce, etc., all in one backyard somewhere in the middle of suburbia. I guess they're going to start grinding their own flour as well.

Plus we've got guns so I guess we're all set?
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#4
(11-14-2015, 10:58 AM)Sequentia Wrote: I'm not but my parents definitely are, and they are not practicing Catholics. My dad buys all sorts of odd stuff but he also has a "green thumb." I have tried growing edible things such as oyster mushrooms but I ultimately fail in the end. My mushrooms never grow, and mushrooms are good at growing! :( My parents have a small greenhouse, growing all sorts of things throughout the whole year...crops that I don't even know the names of. They grow basic things such as green beans, tomatoes, egg plant, brussel sprouts, peppers, peas, lettuce, etc., all in one backyard somewhere in the middle of suburbia. I guess they're going to start grinding their own flour as well.

Plus we've got guns so I guess we're all set?

Well, that's good. If more people would just put back what they can, it will make a difference when things go south.
"Not only are we all in the same boat, but we are all seasick.” --G.K. Chesterton
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