Veiling Question
#1
For those women who have to attend the Ordinary Form of the Mass, do you veil?

I really feel the call to start veiling during divine liturgy so I bought myself a black mantilla (which I read is probably a mistake for me-only married women wear black?  ???). Veiling is more common at the Byzantine Catholic parish I attend but not everyone does it. However, it's not out of place.

But when I go to the O.F. Mass at my Roman rite parish pretty much all the women I see don't veil. I'm not passing judgment by any means but I feel like that if I veil at the O.F. Mass people might get the wrong idea ("Look, she's veiling to draw attention to her!" or something) as to why I'm covering my hair. It's no where near as common as in the Eastern churches/Latin Mass so should I just do it anyway?

A stupid question but I've never done this before.
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#2
I veil at our OF Mass. I am often the only one who is, although there are a couple of elderly ladies who are wearing hats. There are a few young women who also veil, but they don't typically go to same Mass as me.

You would be surprised. I've gotten several comments of, "I love seeing that!" from both men and women. Lots of questions, certainly, but good ones. A few women have said that they should bring theirs "out of retirement" but they are nervous because they put them away years and years ago.

I tried to make mine inconspicuous by selecting one that was similar to my hair colour (I'm a dark brown) and roughly the same length of my hair, just skimming the shoulders. It sort of blends in, I think, and makes me not stand out as much.

It was very, very hard for me initially for the reasons you state. I was worried what people would think. But I quickly got over it. Now, I think I would feel naked without it, and I won't even enter the sanctuary without it.
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#3
I veil at the OF and no one really makes a big fuss over it like I'm "holier than thou". I get the occasional stare from children, but that's understandable in the post-Vatican II era. I actually had one woman commend me for wearing it after Mass. I think it sets a good example, along with receiving Communion on the tongue, at the OF, because you never know who may think to themselves, "I'd like to do that, too." I noticed a young couple coming for Communion at my parish a while back and they both received on the tongue, from the looks of it. We need people, especially younger people (who rarely attend Mass anymore as a demographic), to set this type of example.
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#4
I'm obviously not a woman but I have noticed a few women who veil and receive on the tongue at my NO church.
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#5
I cover my head even when I attend a NO mass. For a while I would wear hats instead of veils because I thought it would be less conspicuous (not many veils out there blend in with red hair lol!), but after wearing a veil once and getting positive comments, I realized that not that many people will give you a hard time either way.

I had the same concerns you have when I started veiling at NO masses, but in my opinion those fears are larger than reality. When we have fears like that, it's because we've heard the nastier voices of dissension (liberal priests and angry, "liberated" women) louder than the average Catholic attending our parishes. I would say those "nastier voices" have greater danger to their souls than any scandal or distraction that you might cause them. From the comments I get, most people at NO parishes know so little about veiling, "that person" being "holier then thou" doesn't even cross their mind- they're more curious than anything. I've only had one person say something truly rude to me and other veiling women, and it was an older 1970's NO priest whose parish I now avoid  :P

As others have said, you also never know who you might positively influence. There was a woman I knew who asked another woman to remove her hat when she entered the church. It turned out that it was honest ignorance- she genuinely thought that all people were supposed to have their heads uncovered in church. When my husband and I shared with her what we knew about Catholic veiling, this same woman started veiling too!
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#6
(11-14-2015, 02:23 PM)Dominicus Wrote: I'm obviously not a woman but I have noticed a few women who veil and receive on the tongue at my NO church.

I actually receive on the tongue now at the OF Mass whenever I go. My guess is more people take on the tongue (especially those of non-European descent I find) than I actually realize.

We always receive the Eucharist on the tongue in the Byzantine Catholic church as well.
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#7

To heck with comments either way, positive or negative. Do it for God; do it for Tradition; do it to set an example.

If you think veiling is right and want to see a parish-ful of veiled women, then BE the change you want to see. Don't wait for someone else to restore Tradition! DO IT yourself! Someone has to lead!  You can think of this in sort of "Kitty Genovese" terms. Miss Genovese was the woman who was murdered in NYC (I believe it was) and whose screams and cries for help were heard by many -- but no one bothered to call the cops, thinking "someone else" would do it. Don't be like those people. Don't wait for "someone else" to bring veiling back!

And really, most people either won't care at all, not one whit -- or they'll admire you for it and, if female, wish they had the "whatever it takes" to veil themselves, and may well follow your example. As long as you're a decent, friendly, warm, humble person, your veiling can do nothing but good.

FWIW, I've many times been the only veiled woman at a NO Mass. I've also been the only one to receive not just on the tongue, but kneeling. I've never gotten a dirty look. But if I had, I hope -- and I think -- that I'd have let it roll off me like water off a duck's butt. Life's too short, ya know?
 
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#8
(11-14-2015, 11:59 PM)Vox Clamantis Wrote: To heck with comments either way, positive or negative. Do it for God; do it for Tradition; do it for Tradition; do it to set an example...
 

This, 1,000 times. Vox is absolutely right. I'm one of the very few young people who wear a suit to mass at my NO church, it does make me feel a little self conscious but I bear it for the Lord.
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#9
(11-15-2015, 12:10 AM)Dominicus Wrote:
(11-14-2015, 11:59 PM)Vox Clamantis Wrote: To heck with comments either way, positive or negative. Do it for God; do it for Tradition; do it for Tradition; do it to set an example...
 

This, 1,000 times. Vox is absolutely right. I'm one of the very few young people who wear a suit to mass at my NO church, it does make me feel a little self conscious but I bear it for the Lord.

I don't think it's odd at all that us young people are now beginning to wear nice clothes and/or veiling at Mass. In fact in the few instances I have seen women veiling it's always the 20's/30's crowd doing it. I'll admit I generally did wear t-shirts/blue jeans to Mass but now I just feel like dressing up...not to shame others or outdo anyone but because it "feels good" to look nice. To me it's a great way of giving glory to God.

I wore dress clothes and wore a veil to the OF Mass this morning. It felt awkward at first but no one said anything to me. I'm sure it made me stand out in a large group of people too (my mother also veiled) so I'm hoping I don't give the impression to people that I'm wearing a veil just to "show off."

I know in the past that unmarried women generally wore white veils but I think white would look stupid on me. I wear a black veil because black can match with any color and it just looks better on me.
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#10
(11-15-2015, 12:33 PM)Sequentia Wrote: I wore dress clothes and wore a veil to the OF Mass this morning.

:clap:  Excellent! Way to go, Sequentia!  And I'll bet that within a few months, you'll see another woman or two (or maybe even more!) veiling right along with you :)  From all trads everywhere, THANK YOU for being gutsy!
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