Why are these people disapearring?
#11
(12-01-2015, 02:17 AM)Vox Clamantis Wrote:
(12-01-2015, 02:07 AM)Share Love Wrote: I guess I just don't think of the term "psychic" when I think of Saints such as St. Teresa of Avila, St. Catherine of Siena, St. Padre Pio and others. "Mystic," yes. The term "psychic" just reminds me of New Age, "I feel a female presence attached to the name C...it's a Cathy, or a Catherine, or a Cassie" sort of "psychics".

I remember reading a story about a nun who bargained with the devil so she would have these gifts which looked profoundly spiritual to others, but were not from God. At the end of the day, you just have to very carefully discern with these sorts of things.

One definitely has to discern the spirits, but "psychic" means "relating to or denoting faculties or phenomena that are apparently inexplicable by natural laws, especially involving telepathy or clairvoyance." And that fits the definition of the gifts given to many Saints (e.g., Padre Pio could read souls, for ex.). Plus, there are plenty of people who aren't "professional psychics" (most of whom likely being bogus) but who have had psychic experiences (or at least they seemingly have). People who didn't board the Titanic or take a certain plane that ended up crashing because they were warned not to in a dream or suddenly felt an insistent "tugging" telling them not to, people who, for ex., wake up suddenly at 2:12AM knowing their theretofore healthy Mother has just died and who get the call a few minutes later -- that sort of thing happens all the time.

Fair enough! Smile I guess I've just been turned off of that term because of all the frauds out there.
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#12
The way I've tried to look at some if these unexplained occurrences is that man, even after the Fall still has certain powers and abilities, it's just that some are more aware of them than others. In the case of the saints, they have been transfigured from within and, like in the Slavonic term for saint, they have become prepodobny or " in the original likeness" or something like that.

The closer to God one gets the more the veil is torn between man and the gifts he had before the Fall. Even animals love saints because even they have some sort of hidden memory of the harmony man shared with them in Eden.

In the case of psychics there's some that are legitimate,they somehow have access to some of the original powers all men had in the Garden. Some are mimicked from the demons though.



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#13
(11-30-2015, 09:11 PM)formerbuddhist Wrote: One thing that struck me was that comment by the trucker that called in where he mentioned places that just have a bad vibe. I am certainly not a psychic but I've been in places like that even in the woods,places that make the hair on the back of my neck stand on end for no reason, or that make me feel desolate or ill at ease. Around here it's Ocala National Forest. The whole place has an aura of evil and desolation around it that I can't explain. I don't like to even have to drive through it or be near it. It's just...creepy. It's crazy because other places don't make me feel that way at all.

Ever been to the very north of Wisconsin or just right across the border into the Upper Peninsula of Michigan? Definitely an eerie place. I had to travel there for a school field trip and it was during September. Tons of fog and rain. I remember us driving through a state park (which I can't remember the name of) with deep fog and it felt like I had a "deja vu" experience. Not really a scary or fearful feeling but something a long the lines of "this place is interesting."

Obviously if you ever travel through Wisconsin, there are waysides/rest places that you sort of have to go out of the area to reach. Some of these waysides are located on Native American burial grounds. The landscapes in parts of Wisconsin are fascinating, perhaps that is what fascinated the early Native Americans to settle there?

Also, there's apparently werewolves and dogmen in both Wisconsin and Michigan so watch out. Grin (if you read some early accounts of the Michigan dogmen they definitely sound demonic to me).
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#14
(12-01-2015, 04:27 PM)Sequentia Wrote:
(11-30-2015, 09:11 PM)formerbuddhist Wrote: One thing that struck me was that comment by the trucker that called in where he mentioned places that just have a bad vibe. I am certainly not a psychic but I've been in places like that even in the woods,places that make the hair on the back of my neck stand on end for no reason, or that make me feel desolate or ill at ease. Around here it's Ocala National Forest. The whole place has an aura of evil and desolation around it that I can't explain. I don't like to even have to drive through it or be near it. It's just...creepy. It's crazy because other places don't make me feel that way at all.

Ever been to the very north of Wisconsin or just right across the border into the Upper Peninsula of Michigan? Definitely an eerie place. I had to travel there for a school field trip and it was during September. Tons of fog and rain. I remember us driving through a state park (which I can't remember the name of) with deep fog and it felt like I had a "deja vu" experience. Not really a scary or fearful feeling but something a long the lines of "this place is interesting."

Obviously if you ever travel through Wisconsin, there are waysides/rest places that you sort of have to go out of the area to reach. Some of these waysides are located on Native American burial grounds. The landscapes in parts of Wisconsin are fascinating, perhaps that is what fascinated the early Native Americans to settle there?

Also, there's apparently werewolves and dogmen in both Wisconsin and Michigan so watch out. Grin (if you read some early accounts of the Michigan dogmen they definitely sound demonic to me).


I used to camp up in the upper peninsula near whitefish bay and Paradise growing up. I grew up in southeast Michigan. The Lake Superior area is beautiful but I agree that it's a bit creepy. It's desolate, wild and dangerous, and if the black bears, the quicksand bogs and the Mosquitos won't get you than hypothermia can....at any time of the year. 

Ha, Michigan dogmen? I'll have to read about that! I lived there near Ann Arbor and East Lansing for over 20 plus years and never heard of them. Must be an upper peninsula thing.  Smile
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#15
Another thread that pulls the Sedona stories outta me...

I can personally attest that there are some areas that are sites of New Age/"Native" "blessings" have a residual effect that lingers for years after.  In Sedona there are a number of "vortexes" that the hippies claim are places where "earth energies" flow easily.  They all happen to be places with Wiccan ceromony history dating back to the mid-70's.  They are places with a profound feeling of entrenched unnaturalness.
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#16
(12-01-2015, 06:05 PM)dcmaccabees Wrote: Another thread that pulls the Sedona stories outta me...

I can personally attest that there are some areas that are sites of New Age/"Native" "blessings" have a residual effect that lingers for years after.  In Sedona there are a number of "vortexes" that the hippies claim are places where "earth energies" flow easily.  They all happen to be places with Wiccan ceromony history dating back to the mid-70's.  They are places with a profound feeling of entrenched unnaturalness.

Ha! There's some weird stuff out there in the American Southwest. I'm not sure what it is, but it's strange. Its like a road runner cartoon out there with those big red mesas closing in on you from all directions.

Theres no doubt in my mind that Wicca and other firms of the occult can open doors to who knows what. I dabbled in it back in high school. In my childhood home in the basement where me and my wannabe Wiccan friends opened magick circles my mom used to hear glass shattering when no one was down there, footsteps on the staircase, and even my skeptical non religious brother actually heard someone clear their throat and speak. Growing up there I saw a humanoid figure of light run from my old bedroom to my moms and it scared me so bad I ran out of the house. To this day the basement makes the hair on the back of my neck stand up, and I will not go down there after dark. I get chills.

These rituals undoubtedly open up doorways to something...

It always baffles me how so many adults actually fall for stuff like Wicca, Sacred Geometry,Golden Dawn Occultism or many of the other strange and downright bogus stuff out there.
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#17
(12-01-2015, 05:18 PM)formerbuddhist Wrote:
(12-01-2015, 04:27 PM)Sequentia Wrote:
(11-30-2015, 09:11 PM)formerbuddhist Wrote: One thing that struck me was that comment by the trucker that called in where he mentioned places that just have a bad vibe. I am certainly not a psychic but I've been in places like that even in the woods,places that make the hair on the back of my neck stand on end for no reason, or that make me feel desolate or ill at ease. Around here it's Ocala National Forest. The whole place has an aura of evil and desolation around it that I can't explain. I don't like to even have to drive through it or be near it. It's just...creepy. It's crazy because other places don't make me feel that way at all.

Ever been to the very north of Wisconsin or just right across the border into the Upper Peninsula of Michigan? Definitely an eerie place. I had to travel there for a school field trip and it was during September. Tons of fog and rain. I remember us driving through a state park (which I can't remember the name of) with deep fog and it felt like I had a "deja vu" experience. Not really a scary or fearful feeling but something a long the lines of "this place is interesting."

Obviously if you ever travel through Wisconsin, there are waysides/rest places that you sort of have to go out of the area to reach. Some of these waysides are located on Native American burial grounds. The landscapes in parts of Wisconsin are fascinating, perhaps that is what fascinated the early Native Americans to settle there?

Also, there's apparently werewolves and dogmen in both Wisconsin and Michigan so watch out. Grin (if you read some early accounts of the Michigan dogmen they definitely sound demonic to me).


I used to camp up in the upper peninsula near whitefish bay and Paradise growing up. I grew up in southeast Michigan. The Lake Superior area is beautiful but I agree that it's a bit creepy. It's desolate, wild and dangerous, and if the black bears, the quicksand bogs and the Mosquitos won't get you than hypothermia can....at any time of the year. 

Ha, Michigan dogmen? I'll have to read about that! I lived there near Ann Arbor and East Lansing for over 20 plus years and never heard of them. Must be an upper peninsula thing.  Smile

If I remember correctly, the Michigan dogman is a mainland (Michigan) phenomenon. I'm not too sure if there have been alleged sightings in the U.P. at all. Wisconsin has the "Beast of Bray Road" (similar to the Michigan Dogman but wolfish[?)). I think the earliest sighting of an athropoid wolf in Wisconsin was in the 1920's/1930's. Apparently it showed up on a Native American burial mound and kept saying "Gadara" or something (from the Bible). Spooky thing and if it's true sounds demonic to me.

There's a lady reporter who has written about the sightings in Wisconsin and Michigan. Whether they are true or not, the books are fascinating. Her name is Linda S. Godfrey. Wisconsin and Michigan always seemed like odd states to me. LOL
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#18
(12-01-2015, 06:25 PM)formerbuddhist Wrote: Ha! There's some weird stuff out there in the American Southwest. I'm not sure what it is, but it's strange. Its like a road runner cartoon out there with those big red mesas closing in on you from all directions.

Theres no doubt in my mind that Wicca and other firms of the occult can open doors to who knows what. I dabbled in it back in high school. In my childhood home in the basement where me and my wannabe Wiccan friends opened magick circles my mom used to hear glass shattering when no one was down there, footsteps on the staircase, and even my skeptical non religious brother actually heard someone clear their throat and speak. Growing up there I saw a humanoid figure of light run from my old bedroom to my moms and it scared me so bad I ran out of the house. To this day the basement makes the hair on the back of my neck stand up, and I will not go down there after dark. I get chills.

These rituals undoubtedly open up doorways to something...

It always baffles me how so many adults actually fall for stuff like Wicca, Sacred Geometry,Golden Dawn Occultism or many of the other strange and downright bogus stuff out there.

I'm seeing a sort of contradiction in what you wrote. First you say that stuff like Wicca opens up doorways, and then you express being baffled by how many adults fall for such stuff. While most of that stuff is "bogus" in that it isn't what it pretends to be, it isn't "bogus" in the sense that it is ineffective, etc. People want power, and demons pose as non-demons and give them power. The "white magic" of the Wicca stuff (which is bogus in terms of the narrative Wicca has for itself) is demons at work, and it does "work" insofar as it can give people what they think they want. It will bite them in the end. Always. But I think there are not good, but understandable reasons why even adults get bound up with that stuff (with "bound up" being a good phrase to use here, if I do say so myself!)
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#19
i didnt listen to the article thingy because i already have enough nightmares as it is

but i wonder if it is a Christopher McCandless sort of thing...men tend to go into the woods to test themselves, and unfortunately not all pass the test
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#20
(12-02-2015, 12:48 AM)Vox Clamantis Wrote:
(12-01-2015, 06:25 PM)formerbuddhist Wrote: Ha! There's some weird stuff out there in the American Southwest. I'm not sure what it is, but it's strange. Its like a road runner cartoon out there with those big red mesas closing in on you from all directions.

Theres no doubt in my mind that Wicca and other firms of the occult can open doors to who knows what. I dabbled in it back in high school. In my childhood home in the basement where me and my wannabe Wiccan friends opened magick circles my mom used to hear glass shattering when no one was down there, footsteps on the staircase, and even my skeptical non religious brother actually heard someone clear their throat and speak. Growing up there I saw a humanoid figure of light run from my old bedroom to my moms and it scared me so bad I ran out of the house. To this day the basement makes the hair on the back of my neck stand up, and I will not go down there after dark. I get chills.

These rituals undoubtedly open up doorways to something...

It always baffles me how so many adults actually fall for stuff like Wicca, Sacred Geometry,Golden Dawn Occultism or many of the other strange and downright bogus stuff out there.

I'm seeing a sort of contradiction in what you wrote. First you say that stuff like Wicca opens up doorways, and then you express being baffled by how many adults fall for such stuff. While most of that stuff is "bogus" in that it isn't what it pretends to be, it isn't "bogus" in the sense that it is ineffective, etc. People want power, and demons pose as non-demons and give them power. The "white magic" of the Wicca stuff (which is bogus in terms of the narrative Wicca has for itself) is demons at work, and it does "work" insofar as it can give people what they think they want. It will bite them in the end. Always. But I think there are not good, but understandable reasons why even adults get bound up with that stuff (with "bound up" being a good phrase to use here, if I do say so myself!)

That's true. Wicca is at least a worldview with connection to seasons and cycles, symbol and ritual. There's a sort of logic and appeal to it, and in that sense I see the appeal. I suppose the other firms of occultism are similiar, but there's something appealing about the various forms that put one in touch with the cycles of the sun, the moon, the stars and the seasons. I can see adults falling for that.

The stuff I'm baffled by is crystals, sacred geometry, aura readings, A Course in Miracles[/i ]and some of the other bizarre elements  and fringe groups among the new age.  Maybe my own conversion over the years makes me automatically see the emptiness of these things and so I don't put myself in the shoes of someone who knows nothing but secularism and than gets caught up in crystals, high colonics and sacred geometry because it is [i]something, anything other than the empty secular scientific narrative.

And no doubt power and influence can be gained.

One thing that always gets me is how people get excited about how some psychic told them,say,what the color of grandmas favorite sweater was,or even details about grandmas favorite reading chair or something. I guess people want to believe it's really granny who told this psychic, but how do they really know?

And spirit guides,why would anyone want something less than God? I guess these days it's hard for me to put myself back in their shoes.
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