Question about Latin Mass from 1870s
#1
I'm not sure if this is the right place, but I'll give it a try. I'm writing a short story set in the Wild West and revolving around a priest. How would the Latin Mass in 1870 differ from the Latin Mass today? For example: I don't think the St. Michael's prayer had been added yet.

Thanks in advance.
Reply
#2
I have a missal that was printed in 1852 and there were no prayers at the end of mass.
My great great grandfather wrote that when they were unable to go to mass, they would pray from their mass book.
Reply
#3
So Mass would end with the second Gospel and the priest processing out?
Reply
#4
Please let us know if you have it finished already, and if possible, have us take a look :)
Reply
#5
(12-05-2015, 08:05 AM)JohnPaulW Wrote: So Mass would end with the second Gospel and the priest processing out?

Pretty much.  There are some calendar differences and there may be minor differences like the number of times a priest signs himself with the cross. 

Now in the Wild West period, you had some interesting trends in the Church.  For instance, barnstorming and revival like events with groups of priests were not uncommon, in fact Dominican priests used to travel in bands up and down the river several times a year as there were so few priests in many of these towns.  Much of the Old West exposure to Catholicism came through religious orders.  When the dioceses in the rockies and upper Midwest were formed, the new bishops desperate for priests and religious gave quite a bit of land and privileges for religious to settle out that way, it is also the reason why despite declining membership that left-wing moonbat sisters and brothers are still able to operate as they maintain the million of dollars of property that were given to them. 

Now if you do decide to use a religious priest like Francisican, Dominicans, or Benedictines, there are slight differences in the celebration of Mass.  In fact, the Dominicans had their own rite altogether.   
Reply
#6
(12-05-2015, 08:42 AM)Neopelagianus Wrote: Please let us know if you have it finished already, and if possible, have us take a look :)

Well, I'm at the planning stage now, so I don't have anything written. I also don't want to give the plot away until I'm done, but it will be very similar to the story of St. Moses the Black. Just set in the Wild West.  :)
Reply
#7
If you are going to talk about the "wild west" and Catholicism just remember that the indigenous "Mexican" population was predominantly Catholic.
Reply
#8
Maybe if you are going to talk about the 'wild west' you could say something about this;

Two mysteries surround the spiral staircase in the Loretto Chapel: the identity of its builder and the physics of its construction.

When the Loretto Chapel was completed in 1878, there was no way to access the choir loft twenty-two feet above. Carpenters were called in to address the problem, but they all concluded access to the loft would have to be via ladder as a staircase would interfere with the interior space of the small Chapel.

Legend says that to find a solution to the seating problem, the Sisters of the Chapel made a novena to St. Joseph, the patron saint of carpenters. On the ninth and final day of prayer, a man appeared at the Chapel with a donkey and a toolbox looking for work. Months later, the elegant circular staircase was completed, and the carpenter disappeared without pay or thanks. After searching for the man (an ad even ran in the local newspaper) and finding no trace of him, some concluded that he was St. Joseph himself, having come in answer to the sisters' prayers.

The stairway's carpenter, whoever he was, built a magnificent structure. The design was innovative for the time and some of the design considerations still perplex experts today.

The staircase has two 360 degree turns and no visible means of support. Also, it is said that the staircase was built without nails—only wooden pegs. Questions also surround the number of stair risers relative to the height of the choir loft and about the types of wood and other materials used in the stairway's construction.

Over the years many have flocked to the Loretto Chapel to see the Miraculous Staircase. The staircase has been the subject of many articles, TV specials, and movies including "Unsolved Mysteries" and the television movie titled "The Staircase."

http://www.lorettochapel.com/staircase.html
Reply
#9
(12-10-2015, 12:32 AM)Poche Wrote: Maybe if you are going to talk about the 'wild west' you could say something about this;

Two mysteries surround the spiral staircase in the Loretto Chapel: the identity of its builder and the physics of its construction.

When the Loretto Chapel was completed in 1878, there was no way to access the choir loft twenty-two feet above. Carpenters were called in to address the problem, but they all concluded access to the loft would have to be via ladder as a staircase would interfere with the interior space of the small Chapel.

Legend says that to find a solution to the seating problem, the Sisters of the Chapel made a novena to St. Joseph, the patron saint of carpenters. On the ninth and final day of prayer, a man appeared at the Chapel with a donkey and a toolbox looking for work. Months later, the elegant circular staircase was completed, and the carpenter disappeared without pay or thanks. After searching for the man (an ad even ran in the local newspaper) and finding no trace of him, some concluded that he was St. Joseph himself, having come in answer to the sisters' prayers.

The stairway's carpenter, whoever he was, built a magnificent structure. The design was innovative for the time and some of the design considerations still perplex experts today.

The staircase has two 360 degree turns and no visible means of support. Also, it is said that the staircase was built without nails—only wooden pegs. Questions also surround the number of stair risers relative to the height of the choir loft and about the types of wood and other materials used in the stairway's construction.

Over the years many have flocked to the Loretto Chapel to see the Miraculous Staircase. The staircase has been the subject of many articles, TV specials, and movies including "Unsolved Mysteries" and the television movie titled "The Staircase."

http://www.lorettochapel.com/staircase.html

A sad footnote to this is that the only "mass" offered at the chapel is now one by the "Church of Antioch". They out Episcopalian the Episcopalians, as hard as that is to believe...
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)