Men: What Does it Feel Like to be Pregnant?
#1


  I'm using modern terminology here -- you know how today's couples say, "We're pregnant!"?  My questions are these: 

What does it feel like when your wife tells you she's pregnant?

What is it like for men to go through pregnancy with their wives?

Is there anything about your wife's being pregnant that you hate, is annoying, that you wish were different, etc.?

Would you/Did you choose to be in the delivery room -- or not? Why or why not?

Is there any feeling of envy involved with regard to any aspect of pregnancy or early motherhood (e.g., lactation, being able to feel the baby move INSIDE you, the very idea of being able to carry a child, etc.)?

At what point during pregnancy or after birth does it really, really HIT you that you're a FATHER?

What, if anything, do you think should be done differently when it comes to the whole pregnancy process and the birth process?

When your wife is pregnant, do you look at her differently in some way?  What about the birth?

How does your wife's being pregnant or having been affect how you see her sexually?  What about after the birth when she's no longer just your wife, but also a mother?

And, while I'm at it, what do you guys think about how modern couples say "we're pregnant"? And what do the women reading this think?

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#2
With this pregnancy my reaction eas "Again?!?"  :LOL:

Joking around. Being a father is one of the greatest thrills and honors of my life. When she first tells me, I'm always surprised, followed by elation.

I've never said, "We're pregnant", only "We're expecting." Although folks who say "We're pregnant ", don't really bother me, as I consider it important, maybe a husband's duty, to fully support his wife.

The 2 things with pregnancy that I hate are her extreme changes in food likes; currently she despises tomato sauce and grilled foods and tomato sauce, so pasta and bratwurs/chorizo are out the window. Also it makes her really cranky. I can deal with that to a point when I remind her that "pregnancy is a cause for crankiness, not an excuse to kick the dog. Or every other animal on the farm." :LOL:

I was in the delivery room for all our crib midgets. I just felt it was my place.

The ONLY thing I'm jealous about is that she can say "I'm tired and nauseous, you deal with the kids!" :LOL:

It hit me with pregnancy #1 that I was going to be a dad when I could watch the baby doing cartwheels in her stomach. Then it REALLY hit me when I held my daughter (our oldest) for the first time. Just like momma, she had a cranky streak. Argentine temper, I guess. With the 3 boys after her, it seemed less "magical," for lack of a better word, but holding a new infant is always an indescribable feeling.

Her being a mother doesn't affect how I see my wife sexually, although I find her more attractive for some reason I can't explain . I know that her being a mother has caused me to view her with more...reverence, I guess is the best word, since I consider motherhood to be a beautiful and sacred blessing.
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#3
Ha ha ha... let me tell you a little story.

In 2005, in the space of 8 weeks we
- found out I was pregnant
- my husband was offered a job 250km away
- we sold our old house
- got married
- bought a new house in our new location
- packed up and moved
- my husband started his new job
- I started a temporary position with my employer in the new location, until I gave birth basically the following spring.

It was a lot. The mortgage officer (who our family had known for years) actually looked at me and said, "has your mother smacked you yet? why on earth would you do that to yourself?"

Now, we were living away from our families for the first time ever. I was still living near my family during the first trimester, but was away for the second and third as your belly blossoms. So, we took picture of my growing belly and sent it.

My husband's new job was mostly a desk job. I mean, he gets out in the field, but he's not crawling around in ductwork and fishing wire and stuff like his old job back home (he now has underlings that do that for him). So, he put on a bit around the middle those first 6 months.

So every month, we took a picture of my growing belly.

Then, for laughs, we took a picture of his.

He lost his "baby weight" once the baby came. Me... not so much.  :P
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#4
(01-10-2016, 10:52 PM)Vox Clamantis Wrote: Would you/Did you choose to be in the delivery room -- or not? Why or why not?

Aside from it being an emergency, would any father choose not to be there?
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#5
(01-12-2016, 12:38 AM)PrairieMom Wrote:
(01-10-2016, 10:52 PM)Vox Clamantis Wrote: Would you/Did you choose to be in the delivery room -- or not? Why or why not?

Aside from it being an emergency, would any father choose not to be there?

I'm not a father, but the thought isn't very appealing. God created midwives for a reason.
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#6
The weight mostly shifted with us, she gained the weight and I lost the weight, now that our daughter is born, we have both continued to gain weight :P
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#7
(01-12-2016, 06:01 AM)Renatus Frater Wrote:
(01-12-2016, 12:38 AM)PrairieMom Wrote:
(01-10-2016, 10:52 PM)Vox Clamantis Wrote: Would you/Did you choose to be in the delivery room -- or not? Why or why not?

Aside from it being an emergency, would any father choose not to be there?

I'm not a father, but the thought isn't very appealing. God created midwives for a reason.

Interesting thought, but before I became a father, I felt the same way.  Once we found out we were having a baby, the thought no longer bothered me.  I guess it was the connection that it was my child and my wife, not random pictures from family life or biology class.
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#8
(01-12-2016, 06:01 AM)Renatus Frater Wrote:
(01-12-2016, 12:38 AM)PrairieMom Wrote:
(01-10-2016, 10:52 PM)Vox Clamantis Wrote: Would you/Did you choose to be in the delivery room -- or not? Why or why not?

Aside from it being an emergency, would any father choose not to be there?

I'm not a father, but the thought isn't very appealing. God created midwives for a reason.

Our youngest was born via cesarean. I'm not queasy  by nature, but the first glimpse of the doc making the incision in my wife cured me from glancing behind the curtain for the rest of the procedure.
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#9
(01-12-2016, 03:10 PM)dcmaccabees Wrote:
(01-12-2016, 06:01 AM)Renatus Frater Wrote:
(01-12-2016, 12:38 AM)PrairieMom Wrote:
(01-10-2016, 10:52 PM)Vox Clamantis Wrote: Would you/Did you choose to be in the delivery room -- or not? Why or why not?

Aside from it being an emergency, would any father choose not to be there?

I'm not a father, but the thought isn't very appealing. God created midwives for a reason.

Our youngest was born via cesarean. I'm not queasy  by nature, but the first glimpse of the doc making the incision in my wife cured me from glancing behind the curtain for the rest of the procedure.

That I could understand, but you were still there! Being there and looking are two entirely different things.

This last birth was the first one my husband actually saw, although he was present for all of them (just due to the position I birthed in this time). He thought it was pretty gross. He's all like, "I don't remember that with the other ones!", LOL.
(01-12-2016, 06:01 AM)Renatus Frater Wrote:
(01-12-2016, 12:38 AM)PrairieMom Wrote:
(01-10-2016, 10:52 PM)Vox Clamantis Wrote: Would you/Did you choose to be in the delivery room -- or not? Why or why not?

Aside from it being an emergency, would any father choose not to be there?

I'm not a father, but the thought isn't very appealing. God created midwives for a reason.

Midwives were created to keep women from dying in childbirth. But yes, birthing is traditionally seen as "women's work". Although where I live, we have one of only 2 or 3 male midwives in Canada.
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#10
(01-12-2016, 05:27 PM)PrairieMom Wrote: That I could understand, but you were still there! Being there and looking are two entirely different things.

This last birth was the first one my husband actually saw, although he was present for all of them (just due to the position I birthed in this time). He thought it was pretty gross. He's all like, "I don't remember that with the other ones!", LOL.

It's not NOT gross, ya know?  I live/grew up in a rural environment, so the "miracle of life" is something I've seen a few times.  However, watching a cow calf doesn't really prepare you for your wife giving birth.  Mostly what I thought during the first one was "Thank God I don't have to do that" and "Please stop crushing my hand, darling wife".

What I really don't get though is the expectation that the father is going to whack the cord.  It's weird. 
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