Mother Catherine Abrikosova and the Russian Byzantine Dominicans
#1
Has there been any news about cause of beatification/canonization for Mother Catherine Abrikosova (currently Servant of God) and the other Russian Byzantine Dominicans who were martyred during the era of communism between the 1920's-1950's?

For those who don't know about Mother Catherine and her community, she is a convert to Catholicism (Eastern Catholic); members of her community converted from Judaism and even Orthodoxy, or from a lukewarm faith. Mother Catherine and the Sisters were arrested after taking their vows in 1923, and succumbed to years of working in the gulags or forced into exile, courtesy of our "glorious" communist brethren in Russia. Mother Catherine herself died in 1936 I believe, while other Sisters managed to survive the labor camps into the 1950's. Many of them were still martyred anyway.

I haven't really been able to find any recent information about their cause moving forward, other than being introduced to Rome by the Archdiocese of the Mother of God at Moscow.

I think it's sad that the stories of martyrdom that Mother Catherine and the Sisters faced are not more well-known. I often wondered what Russia would be like if they were an Eastern Catholic country, though devotion to Our Lady of Fatima is well-known among the small group of Russian Catholics.
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#2
(01-14-2016, 02:08 PM)Sequentia Wrote: Has there been any news about cause of beatification/canonization for Mother Catherine Abrikosova (currently Servant of God) and the other Russian Byzantine Dominicans who were martyred during the era of communism between the 1920's-1950's?

For those who don't know about Mother Catherine and her community, she is a convert to Catholicism (Eastern Catholic); members of her community converted from Judaism and even Orthodoxy, or from a lukewarm faith. Mother Catherine and the Sisters were arrested after taking their vows in 1923, and succumbed to years of working in the gulags or forced into exile, courtesy of our "glorious" communist brethren in Russia. Mother Catherine herself died in 1936 I believe, while other Sisters managed to survive the labor camps into the 1950's. Many of them were still martyred anyway.

I haven't really been able to find any recent information about their cause moving forward, other than being introduced to Rome by the Archdiocese of the Mother of God at Moscow.

I think it's sad that the stories of martyrdom that Mother Catherine and the Sisters faced are not more well-known. I often wondered what Russia would be like if they were an Eastern Catholic country, though devotion to Our Lady of Fatima is well-known among the small group of Russian Catholics.

Thanks for this Sequentia, it's interesting.


I envision an Eastern Catholic Russia as pretty much exactly the same as they are today only in juridical communion with the Pope. That is ideal to me. No forced Latinizations, no Vatican II reforms and no interference. Let Russian Catholics in the East be Russian and Eastern in theology, piety and everything else.

I get why Fatima is a devotion for some Russian Catholics but it's not totally necessary, as the Russians have all sorts of Wonderworking icons and special titles for the Theotokos already. They shouldn't have to take up the rosary or have devotions to things like the Immaculate Heart if they don't want. Those are more Western than anything, and foreign to Eastern piety.  That being said,if Russian Catholics want to practice such devotions than so be it. Latinizations are not always forced, they can come up out of genuine popular piety and desire.
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#3
Thanks for sharing about her! I'm Russian Catholic so this is really interesting to me. Personally I love Our Lady of Fatima and the devotion is certainly related to Russia. I think if Russia was Eastern Rite Catholic it would follow the Eastern customs (since the Church encourages and respects that) but be with Rome so Our Lady of Fatima would be more known certainly - doesn't mean it would be forced... we're all Catholic so anything Catholic would be more known, even if originated from a different rite. Just like how Latin rite Catholics might be interested in Eastern rite miracles. I'd be really glad if the schism would end and there would be unity with Rome!
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#4
I read about her and it's interesting that she was a third order Dominican yet Eastern rite in liturgy. I've heard of Eastern rite Catholics getting permission to join Latin orders, but not having an Eastern Community based on a Latin order.  For anyone who reads Russian here is something she wrote :) http://abrikosov-sons.ru/poslednie_sem_slov_s

here's more about her: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anna_Abrikosova

there's also the life of another Dominican Sister who was with her.. she offered her life for the salvation of Russia. http://en.catholicmartyrs.org/index.php?mod=pages&page=entkevich

I love Dominicans and I'm Russian so for me this is so inspiring :)
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#5
I read a longer biography of her in Russian... Its interesting they had Eastern liturgy but also Rosary and Adoration. They didn't support latinizing the East though.

I'm really interested in her life .. She lived such a holy life and had a strong devotion to the Passion, and made a vow to give her life for salvation of Russia and priests. Here's a longer article: http://en.catholicmartyrs.org/index.php?mod=pages&page=abrikosovarticlle
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#6
The scholasticism of the Dominicans (Aquinas, etc.) seems to clash- in approach, not in end- with the mysticism of the East. Byzantine Carmelites, I can understand. Byzantine Dominicans, however, are an odd combination.
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#7
There are many martyrs like that whose names are known only to God. 
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