Pope Francis to travel to Sweden for joint Reformation commemoration
#21
I suppose I'm one of those dyed in the wool Latin Catholic. What most troubles me is certainly not the papacy, the Curia or whatever--really, at the end of the day if the pope does apostatize I wouldn't really leave the Church or consider it false.

What breaks my heart, though, is when I visit the local magnificent Churches, but the life that should sustain it was drained and left to the bare minimum. The NOM, (and modernism in general), is something that haunts churches. This really makes me sad and it really tempts me into leaving the Church.

Makes me wish all us trads would unite and take over the buildings, like the SSPX did in France when the Revolution began.

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#22
(01-26-2016, 05:43 PM)Renatus Frater Wrote: I suppose I'm one of those dyed in the wool Latin Catholic. What most troubles me is certainly not the papacy, the Curia or whatever--really, at the end of the day if the pope does apostatize I wouldn't really leave the Church or consider it false.

What breaks my heart, though, is when I visit the local magnificent Churches, but the life that should sustain it was drained and left to the bare minimum. The NOM, (and modernism in general), is something that haunts churches. This really makes me sad and it really tempts me into leaving the Church.

Makes me wish all us trads would unite and take over the buildings, like the SSPX did in France when the Revolution began.

In order to do that, you need to simply join the SSPX...I'm becoming more convinced that this is simply the last vestige left.  There are good NO priests, but I'm sorry...V2 and this pope have just tainted things so badly that the only cure is a purge and a return to what produced actualy holy saints.


I have strong attachments to some saints, and I can't help but think every time I go to Mass...that I'm worshipping more like a Protestant than a Catholic.
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#23
I echo BC, FB and RFs feelings. For me I can be at peace like FB said but my problem is sometimes I feel as if I need to go talk to a priest for guidance and I honestly don't trust there guidance anymore because I'm afraid I'll get some universalist garbage... It's happened to me before. I guess I could seek refuge in the SSPX or Eastern Catholic Church and I may end up doing that. It just makes me sad because my viewpoints and faith already isolate me from so many people and I have very few people to talk to. Honestly I am truly grateful for this forum and certain bloggers I have contact to. As much bad as the Internet has caused it really does allow me to connect to people I would otherwise never talk to and probably would not have been where I am today without it. Also thankfully I live in Saint Louis so my options are very broad. There is SSPX, Byzantine, FSSP, and probably more. As of now I haven't found a home but I'm sure I just need to look harder.

So yes I am at peace in the sense of what you are saying FB but I also feel what BC is saying, especially since I'm a very political person I get very upset watching not only the decay of the west but also of my Church.
I would really like to take the Benedict Option and start a family oriented traditional society but that is far from a reality at the present for me. Maybe one day. But I know that in the end everything will work out in Gods plan. I just pray he gives me the strength and faith to make it through these dark times and not fall victim to the evils.


I think this sums up how I feel much of the time. 
[Image: 1ebaeb8d4bfd3f138a1f194243dd1fae.jpg]


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#24
Pope Leo x Bull Exsurge Domine


"With the advice and consent of these our venerable brothers, with mature deliberation on each and every one of the above theses, and by the authority of almighty God, the blessed Apostles Peter and Paul, and our own authority, we condemn, reprobate, and reject completely each of these theses or errors as either heretical, scandalous, false, offensive to pious ears or seductive of simple minds, and against Catholic truth. By listing them, we decree and declare that all the faithful of both sexes must regard them as condemned, reprobated, and rejected . . . We restrain all in the virtue of holy obedience and under the penalty of an automatic major excommunication...."

http://www.papalencyclicals.net/Leo10/l10exdom.htm

Seems pretty clear to me. Also, not the Charity offered in the last paragraph. Luther has only himself to blame.
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#25
JP II and Francis just simply do not care about Exsurge Domine. 

I mean Francis actually said his favorite exorcist was a Lutheran for heaven's sakes http://www.diariopopular.com.ar/notas/15...-francisco

Here is JPII:

"The Pope referred to Luther as the theologian who ''contributed in a substantial way to the radical change in the ecclesiastical and secular reality in the West.'' He continued: ''Our world still experiences his great impact on history.''

The Pope noted with satisfaction that the Protestant churches had declared the anniversary year to be an occasion that should serve ''a genuine ecumenical spirit'' and said that he saw this as a ''fraternal invitation'' to a joint reflection on the history and inheritance of Luther."
http://www.nytimes.com/1983/11/06/world/...rsary.html

Yes, let's reflect on the inheritance of Luther and his contributions, shall we?

I--n 1883, Sister Maria Serafina Micheli (1849-1911) was beatified in Faicchio in the province of Benevento in the diocese of Cerreto Sannita 28 May 2011.  The foundress of the Sisters of the Angels, was once going to Eisleben, Saxony, the birthplace of Luther. The fourth centenary of the birth of the great heretic (10 November 1483) was celebrated on that day. She related:

"The streets were crowded, balconies included. Among the many personalities were expected at any time, with the arrival of Emperor Wilhelm I, who presided over the solemn celebrations.

The future Blessed, noting the great hoopla was not interested in knowing the reason for this unusual animation, wanted to find a church and pray to be able to make a visit to the Blessed Sacrament. After walking for a while, she finally found one, but the doors were closed. She knelt on the steps for serenity prayer. As it was in the evening, she had not noticed that it was not a Catholic church, but Protestant. While praying, the angel appeared, who said to her. “Arise, because it is a Protestant church” Then he added: “But I want you to see where Martin Luther was condemned and the pain he suffered as a punishment for his pride.”

After these words, she saw a terrible abyss of fire, where they were cruelly tortured countless souls. In the bottom of this hole there was a man, Martin Luther, which differed from the other: it was surrounded by demons that forced him to kneel, and all armed with hammers, they tried in vain , to shove a big nail in the head. The Religious thought, if some of the people had seen this dramatic scene, they would not have made honors and other commemorations and celebrations for such a character.

Later, the opportunity arose to remind her sisters live in humility and in secret. She was convinced that Martin Luther was punished in hell especially for the first deadly sin of pride. Pride is a deadly sin, which brought him open rebellion against the Roman Catholic Church. His behavior, his attitude towards the Church, and his preaching were crucial to encourage and bring many souls to eternal ruin."(The Woman of the Sanctus: A Life Open to Heaven, Sister Maria Serafina del Sacro Cuore)<----

Saint Teresa of Avila (1582): “It was that vision (of Hell) which filled me with very great distress. I had the greatest sorrow for the so many lost souls that condemned themselves to Hell, especially those Lutherans. - for they were once members of the Church by Baptism - and also gave me the most vehement desires for the salvation of souls [...] I saw souls falling into hell like snowflakes.” [Source: The Collected Works of St. Teresa of Avila, Volume 1, Chapter 32. Published by Institute of Carmelite Studies]

The damnation of poor Luther himself and loss of salvation for 10's of millions, now 100's of millions of souls in his legacy of competing heretical splinter groups.

Commemorate and reflect on that, Francis.

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#26
(01-27-2016, 10:53 AM)BC Wrote: Here is JPII:

[i]"The Pope referred to Luther as the theologian who ''contributed in a substantial way to the radical change in the ecclesiastical and secular reality in the West.'' He continued: ''Our world still experiences his great impact on history.''

Well, he's not wrong there. Many of the problems we have now, including widespread secularism, are a result of the Protestant revolt.

(01-27-2016, 10:53 AM)BC Wrote: The damnation of poor Luther himself and loss of salvation for 10's of millions, now 100's of millions of souls in his legacy of competing heretical splinter groups.

Commemorate and reflect on that, Francis.

I'm not sure many people - especially the clergy - still believe in hell. They certainly don't believe in heresy. And why would they, when the so-called Enlightenment's ideas of freedom of speech and religion are so accepted?
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#27
(01-26-2016, 10:53 PM)DeoDuce Wrote: I echo BC, FB and RFs feelings. For me I can be at peace like FB said but my problem is sometimes I feel as if I need to go talk to a priest for guidance and I honestly don't trust there guidance anymore because I'm afraid I'll get some universalist garbage... It's happened to me before. I guess I could seek refuge in the SSPX or Eastern Catholic Church and I may end up doing that. It just makes me sad because my viewpoints and faith already isolate me from so many people and I have very few people to talk to. Honestly I am truly grateful for this forum and certain bloggers I have contact to. As much bad as the Internet has caused it really does allow me to connect to people I would otherwise never talk to and probably would not have been where I am today without it. Also thankfully I live in Saint Louis so my options are very broad. There is SSPX, Byzantine, FSSP, and probably more. As of now I haven't found a home but I'm sure I just need to look harder.

So yes I am at peace in the sense of what you are saying FB but I also feel what BC is saying, especially since I'm a very political person I get very upset watching not only the decay of the west but also of my Church.
I would really like to take the Benedict Option and start a family oriented traditional society but that is far from a reality at the present for me. Maybe one day. But I know that in the end everything will work out in Gods plan. I just pray he gives me the strength and faith to make it through these dark times and not fall victim to the evils.


I think this sums up how I feel much of the time. 
[Image: 1ebaeb8d4bfd3f138a1f194243dd1fae.jpg]


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I get where you're coming from DeoDuce. I think we are pretty much on the same page here, although I admit I'm pretty apolitical for the most part.

Like good old Elder Paisios is saying, there's every reason to be flustered and upset with all that's wrong in the world, but when push comes to shove it's God that's in charge, and so we ought to rest in God. Like from psalm 45 " Be Still and Know I'm God, or really it's best to meditate on the whole psalm.


One thing I got from being a Buddhist was the importance of present moment awareness, as in what is going on right here,right now, not what's going on in Rome, in Washington or even across the street, but right here, right now in your own awareness. There's the possibility of taking mindfulness into the Christian sphere.... Maybe this is why I like the Jesus Prayer....

In your own moment to moment daily life your peace has nothing to do with what the pope says,or what bishop so and so fails to say, or fails to do. Your peace hinges on your own fidelity to grace and resting in and trusting in God. We cannot carry the world on our shoulders. So much of what we stress over is not our burden to carry.


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#28

(01-26-2016, 05:43 PM)Renatus Frater Wrote: I suppose I'm one of those dyed in the wool Latin Catholic. What most troubles me is certainly not the papacy, the Curia or whatever--really, at the end of the day if the pope does apostatize I wouldn't really leave the Church or consider it false.

What breaks my heart, though, is when I visit the local magnificent Churches, but the life that should sustain it was drained and left to the bare minimum. The NOM, (and modernism in general), is something that haunts churches. This really makes me sad and it really tempts me into leaving the Church.

Makes me wish all us trads would unite and take over the buildings, like the SSPX did in France when the Revolution began.

If we were not so disparate, I would agree.


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"Punishment is justice for the unjust." Saint Augustine of Hippo
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#29
(01-26-2016, 05:43 PM)Renatus Frater Wrote: I suppose I'm one of those dyed in the wool Latin Catholic. What most troubles me is certainly not the papacy, the Curia or whatever--really, at the end of the day if the pope does apostatize I wouldn't really leave the Church or consider it false.

What breaks my heart, though, is when I visit the local magnificent Churches, but the life that should sustain it was drained and left to the bare minimum. The NOM, (and modernism in general), is something that haunts churches. This really makes me sad and it really tempts me into leaving the Church.

Makes me wish all us trads would unite and take over the buildings, like the SSPX did in France when the Revolution began.

Makes me want to kick his butt--except--there are still graces that flow from his Office. So I pray instead. We have the age of Mary at this point in history, which more than makes up for any failings of Peter.
Oh my Jesus, I surrender myself to you. Take care of everything.--Fr Dolindo Ruotolo

Persevere..Eucharist, Holy Rosary, Brown Scapular, Confession. You will win.
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