Book of Common Prayer for Catholic Use Question
#1
Does anyone know of a hand missal that adapts the Book of Common Prayer for Catholic use? I know that there is the Book of Divine Worship (not really in use any longer and out of print) and the new "Divine Worship: The Missal" to be in use at Anglican Ordinariate parishes, but these are ginormous (not to mention very expensive) and are meant to be altar missals.

Or are the two I listed above the only editions you can presently get? It would be nice to have a hand missal, especially for personal prayer.
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#2
(02-10-2016, 10:05 AM)Sequentia Wrote: Does anyone know of a hand missal that adapts the Book of Common Prayer for Catholic use? I know that there is the Book of Divine Worship (not really in use any longer and out of print) and the new "Divine Worship: The Missal" to be in use at Anglican Ordinariate parishes, but these are ginormous (not to mention very expensive) and are meant to be altar missals.

Or are the two I listed above the only editions you can presently get? It would be nice to have a hand missal, especially for personal prayer.


What about Lancelot Andrewes Press? They do a lot of Western Rite Orthodox stuff. I know they have a version of the BCP. I'm not sure if the Ordinariates have anything though. 
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#3
Sequentia, the BDW has been superceded by the Divine Worship Missal. While there is not a hand missal currently published (nor are there plans to soon publish one, AFAIK), each Ordinariate parish has permission to publish a pew booklet with the Ordinary of the Mass. There is an unalterable section, to which we can append our own parish particular stuff e.g. settings, prayers, etc.
Unfortunately, we have been specifically told that these booklets are to stay in the parish and can't be taken home. I don't know why.

There is one parish, however, that has its pew booklet online in pdf format: http://media.wix.com/ugd/3789b1_cb2554de...197f05.pdf

As for the Office from the BCP, an Ordinariate layman has published a book with the Offices and Psalter (no collects or lectionary). You can find it on http://www.walsinghampublishing.com/ He says that he is publishing the complete version, which will include the collects taken from the Divine Worship Missal, and several lectionaries - the Novus Ordo lectionary, which we are unfortunately stuck with for Mass, and the standard BCP lectionary with added readings for more Holy Days and Saints' Days (you will need your own Bible, as they are not the full readings) in May. I am very much looking forward to that.

AFAIK, the BCP published by Lancelot Andrewes is pretty much the standard BCP, slightly Byzantinized, e.g. no Filioque.


If you download that pew booklet and get the Office book that will be printed in May, you will have a good bit of what you need. You just need to add a Bible for the readings.
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#4
(02-10-2016, 10:05 AM)Sequentia Wrote: Does anyone know of a hand missal that adapts the Book of Common Prayer for Catholic use? I know that there is the Book of Divine Worship (not really in use any longer and out of print) and the new "Divine Worship: The Missal" to be in use at Anglican Ordinariate parishes, but these are ginormous (not to mention very expensive) and are meant to be altar missals.

Or are the two I listed above the only editions you can presently get? It would be nice to have a hand missal, especially for personal prayer.

I'm not sure exactly what you're looking for, but the "Anglican Missal" is such a book. It's out of print and no longer used, but you can get a free pdf version and used versions are usually in the $40 range from what I've seen.
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#5
Thanks for the information everyone. I will definitely look into the Lancelot Andrewes Press BCP and other books. Sadly no money as of now but perhaps I can receive something like this as a gift for my birthday. Grin

I am saddened by the fact that there are no Anglican Ordinariate parishes close to me. "Western Rite" Orthodoxy to me just sounds very odd; there is no "West" without recognition of the Bishop of Rome, in my opinion. Huh?
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#6
(02-10-2016, 09:32 PM)Sequentia Wrote: Thanks for the information everyone. I will definitely look into the Lancelot Andrewes Press BCP and other books. Sadly no money as of now but perhaps I can receive something like this as a gift for my birthday. Grin

I am saddened by the fact that there are no Anglican Ordinariate parishes close to me. "Western Rite" Orthodoxy to me just sounds very odd; there is no "West" without recognition of the Bishop of Rome, in my opinion. Huh?

You'd be surprised actually. You ought to read St. Bedes Ecclesiastical History of the English People or Gregory of Tours History of the Franks, or read of the saints of the Isles like St. Guthlac, Cuthbert and Columba. You'll find very little references to the papacy as we know it today. Not to say that Rome wasn't important,but things were quite different back than. I bet most monks and layman had no idea who the pope in Rome was or would even care to know. In Wales it's said that there are fragments of Coptic artifacts, and Irish monasticism is suspiciously similar to the desert fathers. The spirit of the ancient pre schism West was linked to the desert fathers.

The website Orthodox England has some good stuff about all this but I do not reccommend it because the author is a viciously anti Western and anti Catholic Orthodox Priest for ROCOR. It's sad because there are some good things about pre schism saints, customs, history etc. Seriously though, check out the books I mentioned.

Western Orthodoxy is mostly the pet child of disaffected Anglicans that want the fullness of the West without links to the Roman Church or the theology and piety of the counter Reformation. It's mostly an attempted re construction of something that probably didn't exist exactly. Kind of like a historical reenactment. Western Orthodox are pretty much pariahs and exiles with little love and support from their hierarchs.

I think there is Christminster Monastery which is basically a ROCOR Western Rite on the Julian Calendar. Check it out just to see if you're in the area. Not sure where though..

The BCP is actually a decent Prayerbook. Morning and evening prayer are easy, there's plenty of scripture,and the language is hieratic and nice. You could always just get the LAP version and add whatever Catholic devotions you might have.
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#7
(02-11-2016, 12:16 PM)formerbuddhist Wrote: The BCP is actually a decent Prayerbook. Morning and evening prayer are easy, there's plenty of scripture,and the language is hieratic and nice. You could always just get the LAP version and add whatever Catholic devotions you might have.

My main problem with the BCP office is that it can be hard to use as a private prayer office. It's very repetitive -- later revisions of the BCP have made it a bit less so, but it lacks the richness of seasonal and festal variation that the Roman offices (even the LotH) have. Also there are too many places where you get "The officiant may say one or more of the following..."  This element has gotten worse in recent versions, but I prefer the Roman office with its completely fixed sequence.
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#8
The Customary might be something to look at:

http://www.amazon.com/Customary-Lady-Wal...184825122X

I'm not overly-familiar with the "nitty-gritty" of Anglican liturgy, but this is a book of liturgical prayer for morning, evening and night. I'm not sure what else is in it.
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#9
(02-14-2016, 10:02 AM)incorrigable Wrote:
(02-11-2016, 12:16 PM)formerbuddhist Wrote: The BCP is actually a decent Prayerbook. Morning and evening prayer are easy, there's plenty of scripture,and the language is hieratic and nice. You could always just get the LAP version and add whatever Catholic devotions you might have.

My main problem with the BCP office is that it can be hard to use as a private prayer office. It's very repetitive -- later revisions of the BCP have made it a bit less so, but it lacks the richness of seasonal and festal variation that the Roman offices (even the LotH) have. Also there are too many places where you get "The officiant may say one or more of the following..."  This element has gotten worse in recent versions, but I prefer the Roman office with its completely fixed sequence.

I'm definitely more a breviary guy myself, but on the whole the repetitive of the BCP is good for someone just starting out,or who doesn't need variety.

In my own Old Orthodox Prayerbook and Horologion the only real variety are the Troparia and Kontakia and the psalms at Matins and Vespers ( unless you have all the other necessary service books). I sort of like the sameness. It makes me feel rooted. I suppose in a western context the BCP is similar.

I admit I do not like the constant variety of the modern post Pius X breviary so much. I prefer the Benedictine where many of the psalms are the same each day for certain hours,like at lauds with psalm 66 and 148-150. The same with Compline where it's always the same aside from the Marian antiphon.

To each his own I guess. As long as one feels inspired to pray, and pray often!
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