Some things someone said;
#1
I saw an article by someone with a sexually transmitted disease and some thoughts occurred to me;
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#2
After picking up a prescription, I walked back to the train in a daze. I felt ruined. How could I have let this happen? I've been a safe-sex advocate for years. I took classes on sexual health. I interned at Planned Parenthood. And I know that we had used a condom.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles...story.html

After reading this paragraph I think I could understand how this happened
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#3
Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are common. About one in six people ages 14 to 49 have herpes, and virtually all sexually active people have human papillomavirus, or HPV, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). About 1.4 million cases of chlamydia were reported in 2014. The CDC also estimates that there are about 20 million new STIs in the United States each year.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles...story.html

When I heard this I wonder where we are coming to.
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#4
Recently, #ShoutYourStatus was trending on Twitter. People with STIs used the hashtag to connect with one another for support. It was meant to be a way to talk freely about STIs, but it didn't take long for the harassing trolls to take over.

I was called a degenerate, a ho and an idiot. From the safety of their keyboards and identifiable only through their Twitter handles, they labeled me disgusting, gross, stupid and fat. According to them, I should never be allowed to spend time with children. They told me I deserved an STI because I'm a promiscuous whore, a "disease-riddled c---." One even told me I deserved "a (expletive) firing squad."

I received abusive tweets for days afterward. In the span of four days, I blocked 50 people on Twitter. The amount of hate and disdain was unlike anything I'd ever experienced. A few other women I know who are outspoken about their STI conditions made their accounts private to protect themselves.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles...story.html

I don't think it is promoting Christianity to rub salt into other peoples' wounds. 
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#5
So, to others with STIs, know this: You have worth. You are deserving of love. You are more than your diagnosis. And you're not a bad person because you have an STI.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles...story.html

I think Pope Francis would agree with this.
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#6
The best way to prevent STIs is to educate people, and that means talking about it. So please, don't let anyone silence you, whether it's in person or online. And don't listen to the people who say hurtful things — especially the trolls.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles...story.html

I agree. Education is very important. It is important that young people know that there is no cure for this venereal disease. They should learn about the virtue of chastity so that they can avoid getting this disease and others like it.
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#7
RE: STI; aka: STD (Sexually Transmitted Disease...a more precise way of describing the condition than simply a Sexually Transmitted Infection)

If a person, is from birth, chaste and follows the tenets of the Church as regards sexual encounters, and when mating takes place, one mates with another so chaste an individual, one would have no worries about STDs.

So then, any deviation results in infection and disease.

Now, some of these STDs can be transmitted during birth, so your parents chastity is also of importance. But, if everyone were chaste, did not deviate from a Holy sexual history, there would be no STDs, period.
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