26 Foods With More Protein Than an Egg
#11
I just watched something that other day that talked about how in the 60's/70's there was 2 warring academics about the causes of things like heart disease, obesity, type 2 diabetes, etc - one said it was fat (an American), the other sugar (a Brit). The fat guy won, with some nice funding from the sugar industry.

I've been really conscious of how much sugar is in stuff lately.. it's awful! The kids' favourite yougurt has 19g of sugar per serving - 19!!! Most of that is added sugar, because plain yogurt has like 3g as most sugar gets consumed by the bacteria. The recommended amount of sugar per day is only about 25g. I'm going to start mixing it 1/2 and 1/2 with unsweetened yogurt to get their taste buds accustomed to being less sweet.
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#12
I ate an 80-90% fat ketogenic diet and had to stop because I was losing weight.
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#13
(06-12-2016, 01:08 AM)JohnTherese Wrote: I ate an 80-90% fat ketogenic diet and had to stop because I was losing weight.

Wowza, maybe that's what I should be doing to lose weight! (I need to lose more). I'm hesitant to take on any formal diet because doctors have been largely unhelpful.
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#14
Ketogenic works for me but I have an easier time of it in Spring and Summer when (a) there are fewer carborific holidays and (b) it's easier to eat a whole lot of salads.
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#15
(06-12-2016, 06:05 PM)Fontevrault Wrote: Ketogenic works for me but I have an easier time of it in Spring and Summer when (a) there are fewer carborific holidays and (b) it's easier to eat a whole lot of salads.

That's one of the reasons why I like Lent. No indulgence; fasting, abstinence, and what you need to eat. It's great! :)
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#16
Do people actually use the keto diet to lose weight? That boggles my mind!

The ketogenic diet is used as a "last stop" for pediatric epilepsy patients before looking at surgery. We almost got on that train but finally we hit the right combo of meds for my daughter. It's notoriously hard to maintain, and it's too easy to be malnourished on it. It's hard on the kidneys and liver.
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#17
PM, you can lose weight with it and quite effectively.  It's a question of balancing things just so.  You really shouldn't intake fewer than 20 carbs per day and even then it's hard going.  You will end up eating a lot of salad and meat (hence why I do better in spring and summer).  Pasta is possible: zucchini noodles and a meat sauce.  Desserts are possible too.  For fruit, you'll basically be stuck with berries, but I like berries.  In terms of baking, you will end up working with almond flour and coconut flours.  Bread is virtually impossible, though I have seen some recipes.  I haven't had one turn out well thus far.  By and large, most people aim for something around 20 g net carbs, so with fiber it's probably something around 30-40 g carb. 

If you want more info, I can pull together some websites for you.  Last year, I lost 35 pounds this way. 
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#18
(06-12-2016, 10:40 PM)Fontevrault Wrote: PM, you can lose weight with it and quite effectively.  It's a question of balancing things just so.  You really shouldn't intake fewer than 20 carbs per day and even then it's hard going.  You will end up eating a lot of salad and meat (hence why I do better in spring and summer).  Pasta is possible: zucchini noodles and a meat sauce.  Desserts are possible too.  For fruit, you'll basically be stuck with berries, but I like berries.  In terms of baking, you will end up working with almond flour and coconut flours.  Bread is virtually impossible, though I have seen some recipes.  I haven't had one turn out well thus far.  By and large, most people aim for something around 20 g net carbs, so with fiber it's probably something around 30-40 g carb. 

If you want more info, I can pull together some websites for you.  Last year, I lost 35 pounds this way.

Could you send me those links, too? I'd really appreciate it! The way you explained how to eat was so simple and when I've read sites, they're never that clear.
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#19
(06-12-2016, 12:41 AM)PrairieMom Wrote: I just watched something that other day that talked about how in the 60's/70's there was 2 warring academics about the causes of things like heart disease, obesity, type 2 diabetes, etc - one said it was fat (an American), the other sugar (a Brit). The fat guy won, with some nice funding from the sugar industry.

This is what I posted about in my last post. It was all a charade, as usual, with big money and big Agriculture winning out the argument by suppressing with defunding any who went against the 'common truth' and pouring in funding for those who cooked the data to support the myth.

(06-12-2016, 12:41 AM)PrairieMom Wrote: I've been really conscious of how much sugar is in stuff lately.. it's awful! The kids' favourite yougurt has 19g of sugar per serving - 19!!! Most of that is added sugar, because plain yogurt has like 3g as most sugar gets consumed by the bacteria. The recommended amount of sugar per day is only about 25g. I'm going to start mixing it 1/2 and 1/2 with unsweetened yogurt to get their taste buds accustomed to being less sweet.

I support and use Greek yogurt, plain ones and add real fruit to sweeten it a bit. Polamar all fruit jams are great and add minimal sugars (natural ones, no 'fructose') and in the long run it is less expensive than the commercial 'liquid candies' that pass as 'healthy' yogurt. I make an ice cream substitute (I am still technically a Type II Diabetic), with the same ingredients, but with a bit of half and half to thin it. I put it in a blender, add some fresh fruit, like blue berries, raspberries or black berries, banana and strawberries. This goes into big tubs and into the fridge. Makes a great cool ice cream alternative and its good for you!

(06-12-2016, 08:48 PM)PrairieMom Wrote: Do people actually use the keto diet to lose weight? That boggles my mind!

The ketogenic diet is used as a "last stop" for pediatric epilepsy patients before looking at surgery. We almost got on that train but finally we hit the right combo of meds for my daughter. It's notoriously hard to maintain, and it's too easy to be malnourished on it. It's hard on the kidneys and liver.

The Adkins Diet is a Ketogenic Diet. In fact, part of the protocol was to monitor your urine for ketones so as to assess ketosis. The Ketogenic Diet was used quite effectively, before more effective drug therapy was discovered, for Pediatric Epilepsy, but also to treat depression in times past, since the condition of 'ketosis' induced a general feeling of well-being. Adkins , I suppose, also saw a dramatic loss of weight with the diet and promoted it.

It is not the kind of diet that one should remain on, certainly, since it is very hard on the kidneys and to some extent, later, the liver as well. Personally, I recommend it for weight loss (don't forget about the large amounts of water recommended during this diet...helps protect and preserve the kidneys), but once a satisfactory weight is achieved, the "South Beach Diet' is better for maintenance. It is also a higher fat, lower carbohydrate diet, but not as extreme as Adkins is. This regimen worked for me and my Diabetes is in check with out insulin anymore.

BTW: I also love Ezekiel bread. It has no flour and I think any one of the varieties is delicious, but I stay away from the raisin and cinnamon kind because grapes/raisins are 'sugar bombs'. They use grain sprouts and I highly recommend the flax variety of the bread. Its pricey, as it is getting popular, but good.
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#20
(06-12-2016, 10:40 PM)Fontevrault Wrote: Desserts are possible too.  For fruit, you'll basically be stuck with berries, but I like berries. 

Don't forget the Glycemic Index. You can loose weight and keep your carb intake low by following this chart. Strawberries and cherries are low on the index and promote a lower spike in blood glucose than say, grapes.

(06-12-2016, 10:40 PM)Fontevrault Wrote: In terms of baking, you will end up working with almond flour and coconut flours.  Bread is virtually impossible, though I have seen some recipes.  I haven't had one turn out well thus far.  By and large, most people aim for something around 20 g net carbs, so with fiber it's probably something around 30-40 g carb.   

Check out the Ezekiel bread recipes, for one source, to help in this regard. Grain sprouts have little carbs and no gluten (if you have illiac disease), but when done well, as in Ezekiel bread, can be a great alternative to 'flour' breads.
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