Our Relation with Islam
#1
Christians are called to seek the conversion of all Muslims, the president of the Pontifical Council for Christian Univerity told an audience at Cambridge University.

The imperative to seek conversions applies even-- perhaps especially-- to militant Muslims, Cardinal Kurt Koch said.

Speaking at an interfaith meeting, Cardinal Koch said that the duty to evangelize applies to all Christians, in their relations with all other faiths except Judaism. He acknowledged that Christians share with both Jews and Muslims a reverence for the traditions of faith handed down from Abraham. But he said that "we cannot deny that the view of Abraham in Jewish and Christian tradition and the Islamic tradition is not the same."

While Christians acknowledge the covenant God made with the Jewish people, the same cannot be said of the Islamic faith, the cardinals said. Thus "we have only with Jewish people this unique relationship that we do not have with Islam."

http://www.catholicculture.org/news/head...ryid=28373

I think we are called to invite the Jews to conversion also.
:) :) :)

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#2
One step forward, one step back. The idea that Jews, by virtue of having some special blood flowing in their veins because of who their fleshly ancestors were, are somehow uniquely privileged in the eyes of God, such that they alone need not have explicit faith in Christ to come to God, is monstrous. What can this cardinal, a Prince of the Church, hope to achieve by insinuating this? A Jew, considering conversion to Catholicism, might take his words to heart and decide to remain in darkness, potentially at the risk of his immortal soul. And a Muslim, hearing this, might be disposed to reject Christianity for legitimizing the practice of contemporary Judaism (with all its evident faults) as sufficient before God, while granting no such concession in favor of Islam.

There is no more anti-Semitic idea than the notion that we should share Christ with all nations, save for the Jews.

When did this become the prevailing view among the clergy?
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#3
(05-24-2016, 01:36 AM)Cyriacus Wrote: One step forward, one step back. The idea that Jews, by virtue of having some special blood flowing in their veins because of who their fleshly ancestors were, are somehow uniquely privileged in the eyes of God, such that they alone need not have explicit faith in Christ to come to God, is monstrous. What can this cardinal, a Prince of the Church, hope to achieve by insinuating this? A Jew, considering conversion to Catholicism, might take his words to heart and decide to remain in darkness, potentially at the risk of his immortal soul. And a Muslim, hearing this, might be disposed to reject Christianity for legitimizing the practice of contemporary Judaism (with all its evident faults) as sufficient before God, while granting no such concession in favor of Islam.

There is no more anti-Semitic idea than the notion that we should share Christ with all nations, save for the Jews.

When did this become the prevailing view among the clergy?

This racist attitude toward Jews -- an attitude that sees them as having sacred "get out of jail free" DNA -- came about like this:  http://www.fisheaters.com/jewsvaticanii.html
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