Ramadan and fasting
#1
While reading about the beginning of Ramadan today online and how the Muslims will fast for one month it occurred to me rather suddenly that I should fast as well but not necessarily with them but for them. In other words I am going to fast for their conversion. 

While personal it just feels right to put this up to share and invite others to join in.

God Bless!
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#2
Sounds like a good idea, the for them part, that is.  I'll try to join in.

That being said, I'd avoid the Muslim style fast, as it can't be good for you at all.  Not drinking anything from sunrise to sunset tends to cause dehydration, and their style of fasting has been shown to cause weight gain, both from the body storing fat and the famished gorging that typically occurs after sunset.  On that note, maybe I'll make my main meal during fasting days be Middle Eastern.  I can always eat more falafels and tikka. :) :) :)
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#3
Why not follow the fasts the Eastern Catholics and Orthodox do and go meatless on Wednesdays and Fridays?
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#4
I'm not fasting as they do, that did cross my mind, but as we do for Lent.
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#5
(06-06-2016, 01:35 PM)AugustineNYC Wrote: I'm not fasting as they do, that did cross my mind, but as we do for Lent.

Got it, makes sense.

I'd still break the fast in a falafel barn. :)
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#6
Ramadan comes to Islam from the season of Lent in the Catholic Church.
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#7
(06-07-2016, 12:49 AM)Poche Wrote: Ramadan comes to Islam from the season of Lent in the Catholic Church.

I guess you mean the idea of fasting came to Islam from the Church? Because they're at completely different times; Lent varies, but is always in the spring. Ramadan's start time has something to do with the lunar calendar, and can varuby months from year to year.
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#8
Wow!!!! As a convert from islam i want to thank you so much!!
Oftentimes i hear many negative things about muslims, but people forget that they are souls too, souls Jesus wants to save!
I am in on this, i will start tomorrow! May they all convert! :pray:
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#9
(06-07-2016, 10:59 AM)Sir Charles Napier Wrote:
(06-07-2016, 12:49 AM)Poche Wrote: Ramadan comes to Islam from the season of Lent in the Catholic Church.

I guess you mean the idea of fasting came to Islam from the Church? Because they're at completely different times; Lent varies, but is always in the spring. Ramadan's start time has something to do with the lunar calendar, and can varuby months from year to year.

No, I mean the whole concept of a month (or season) of fasting. At the end of Ramadan is the feast of Eid, which involves the slaughter of an animal, either a goat or a lamb. This is from the Jewish sacrifice of the lamb on Passover which is a prefiguration of the sacrifice of Christ on the Cross. 
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#10
(06-08-2016, 12:23 AM)Poche Wrote:
(06-07-2016, 10:59 AM)Sir Charles Napier Wrote:
(06-07-2016, 12:49 AM)Poche Wrote: Ramadan comes to Islam from the season of Lent in the Catholic Church.

I guess you mean the idea of fasting came to Islam from the Church? Because they're at completely different times; Lent varies, but is always in the spring. Ramadan's start time has something to do with the lunar calendar, and can varuby months from year to year.

No, I mean the whole concept of a month (or season) of fasting. At the end of Ramadan is the feast of Eid, which involves the slaughter of an animal, either a goat or a lamb. This is from the Jewish sacrifice of the lamb on Passover which is a prefiguration of the sacrifice of Christ on the Cross.

Got it, thanks.  I completely forgot about the OT roots of the fasting.  Silly me. :blush:
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