I don't get the Medjugorje hype.
#11
(07-05-2016, 02:18 PM)In His Love Wrote: The Vatican has been investigating it pretty heavily over the last year or so, from what I understand. It's not approved or unapproved at the moment; it's in transit. The CDF has advised the faithful not to attend events that have to do with the seers in some countries.

Got it.  Thanks for clarifying the distinction.
Reply
#12
(07-05-2016, 02:24 PM)Sir Charles Napier Wrote:
(07-05-2016, 02:18 PM)In His Love Wrote: The Vatican has been investigating it pretty heavily over the last year or so, from what I understand. It's not approved or unapproved at the moment; it's in transit. The CDF has advised the faithful not to attend events that have to do with the seers in some countries.

Got it.  Thanks for clarifying the distinction.
No problem. :) The US, Italy, and Spain have received messages from the CDF advising the faithful not to attend events that have to do with the seers.

http://www.churchmilitant.com/news/artic...orje-event
Reply
#13
The local bishop already made a judgment about it in 1997 when he said that it cannot be certain to be supernatural (non constat de supernaturalitate). His successor's opinion went even further - constat de non supernaturalitate - it is certain to be not supernatural. The Vatican itself hasn't made a judgment, but the local ordinary is the one to initially judge any alleged apparition.

Regarding the blog comments, the commenter who said that we can't judge anything to be heretical was absolutely wrong. Obviously if anyone says that Jesus is not God, but was only a man, that's heresy. And it doesn't take a highly-trained theologian to conclude that if there's no salvation outside the Church, that all religions are not equal before God. I wouldn't take the article down just because someone thinks you're 'playing pope' by calling error error. But I suppose in an age of 'who am I to judge', Catholics are confused.
Reply
#14
Yeah Medjugorje is weird, whenever I hear about the bizarre things the "seers" say they receive I can't help but thinking about the great lying 'signs and wonders' Christ warns us about in St. Matthew chapter 24. And in my opinion, it's best not to get too attached to these things, because we are not bound to believe even the apparitions approved by the Church, some people start to base their faith around these things and I feel that the message of the Gospel gets lost for alot of people sadly, just always remember that everything we need for salvation was given to us by Christ and his Apostles.
Reply
#15
I believe the seers are seeing someone, but I don't think it's Mary. St. Bernadette and Sister Lucia weren't afraid of Our Lady dropping the baby Jesus. They didn't flinch when startled in the middle of an apparition. They obeyed their superiors. Neither of them reported seeing "Satan in the figure and clothes of Mary" before "Mary" appeared, saying, "I'm sorry about that."

None of it adds up.
Reply
#16
Everyone here has already very sufficiently commented on the obvious problems of Medjugorje. At its core is disobedience of the sort that is unjustifiable. Our Lady has always encouraged obedience to ecclesiastical authorities even if they were mistaken. It comes down to the difference between "Serviam" and "Non Serviam," and we know who uttered the latter.

On another note, just a piece of unsolicited advice. I wouldn't take down your articles (this is the second one you've taken down, yes?) just because it stirs controversy or ill will from readers. This is a critical mistake. The Truth is offensive, even when (and sometimes especially when) it is expressed in an "opinion piece." As St. Thomas Aquinas said, quoting St. Gregory the Great, "If scandal arise from truth, the scandal should be borne rather than the truth be set aside" (ST 3.42.2 ad 1; Hom. vii in Ezek.). Every statement of belief is, epistemologically, a statement of opinion, but some opinions are backed by fact and others aren't. Don't let the rhetoric of offended people stop you from speaking your mind. After all...

It's your blog!

If they want to argue, let them start their own blog. Don't give people that kind of power over you. There is constructive criticism, which ought to be listened to, and useless criticism. Delete useless criticism. Don't respond to it, don't be discouraged by it. Just ignore it, and let it be so that no one ever has to pay attention to it. Life is too short and our goal too lofty to be dragged down by narrow vision.

Sometimes it's opinionated blog posts that create a fire that God's grace takes and leads to deeper conversion. You can't control or predict how God will use your writing. Leave it in His hands, not the neurotic hands of anonymous naysayers with keyboards (including me! :LOL: ).
Reply
#17
(07-05-2016, 05:29 PM)richgr Wrote: Everyone here has already very sufficiently commented on the obvious problems of Medjugorje. At its core is disobedience of the sort that is unjustifiable. Our Lady has always encouraged obedience to ecclesiastical authorities even if they were mistaken. It comes down to the difference between "Serviam" and "Non Serviam," and we know who uttered the latter.

On another note, just a piece of unsolicited advice. I wouldn't take down your articles (this is the second one you've taken down, yes?) just because it stirs controversy or ill will from readers. This is a critical mistake. The Truth is offensive, even when (and sometimes especially when) it is expressed in an "opinion piece." As St. Thomas Aquinas said, quoting St. Gregory the Great, "If scandal arise from truth, the scandal should be borne rather than the truth be set aside" (ST 3.42.2 ad 1; Hom. vii in Ezek.). Every statement of belief is, epistemologically, a statement of opinion, but some opinions are backed by fact and others aren't. Don't let the rhetoric of offended people stop you from speaking your mind. After all...

It's your blog!

If they want to argue, let them start their own blog. Don't give people that kind of power over you. There is constructive criticism, which ought to be listened to, and useless criticism. Delete useless criticism. Don't respond to it, don't be discouraged by it. Just ignore it, and let it be so that no one ever has to pay attention to it. Life is too short and our goal too lofty to be dragged down by narrow vision.

Sometimes it's opinionated blog posts that create a fire that God's grace takes and leads to deeper conversion. You can't control or predict how God will use your writing. Leave it in His hands, not the neurotic hands of anonymous naysayers with keyboards (including me! :LOL: ).

This is excellent advice! 
Reply
#18

I second with richgr said! If you're going to do Catholic stuff on the internet, you've got to develop a thick skin. Trust me on that one. I've been called everything in the book at least twice. Just stay close to Jesus, resolve to never, ever, EVER contradict Church teaching, be clear as to when you're writing personal opinion rather than magisterial teaching, and then let the chips fall where they may.

If you don't have a thick skin and don't think you're the type to grow one, you could remove the comments section altogether. Or avoid contentious subjects and stick to teaching "the hows" of the Faith. But if you take what people say personally, if you let them get you down, if you let others dictate how you do things, if you try to please everyone, you won't last long, I promise. That last is especially the case: you just cannot please everyone. You c-a-n-n-o-t. Don't even try. Please Jesus as best as you can, have fun, and fuhgetaboutit. Know that there will be people out there who hate you, no matter what you do. Pray for them and let their nastiness roll off you like water off a duck's butt. Don't let 'em get you down.
Reply
#19
I have friends that are really "hooked" on it. Even a son of mine went over there about 10 years ago, but he just went for the adventure. He did bring my crucifix back that had been silver when I gave it to him to wear on the trip but it had turned a gold color. He told me he watched it turn color over two days. So what does that mean? ?????? I have no idea.

Personally, I don't need it to confirm my belief in the Catholic church.
Reply
#20
Rome doesn't have to investigate it. The bishop said no. Case closed.

I've heard E. Michael Jones talk about it and have read his book debunking it.

It reminds me of the Mariavites.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)