How Many Glasses of Water Should We Drink a Day?
#1
If ya gotta drink, drink water!!

:)


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Friday, 29 July 2016

How Many Glasses of Water Should We Drink a Day?

It turns out the often quoted “drink at least eight glasses of water a day” dictum has little underpinning scientific evidence. The recommendation was traced back to a 1921 paper, in which the author measured his own pee and sweat and determined we lose about 3% of our body weight in water a day, about eight cups. Consequently, for the longest time, water requirement guidelines for humanity were based on just one person.

There is evidence that not drinking enough may be associated with falls and fractures, heat stroke, heart disease, lung disorders, kidney disease, kidney stones, bladder and colon cancer, urinary tract infections, constipation, dry mouth, cavities, decreased immune function and cataract formation. The problem with many of these studies is that low water intake is associated with several unhealthy behaviors, such as low fruit and vegetable intake, more fast-food, and less shopping at farmers markets. And who drinks lots of water? People who exercise a lot. No wonder they have lower disease rates!

Only large and expensive randomized trials could settle these questions definitively. Given that water cannot be patented, such trials seem unlikely. Who’s going to pay for them? So we’re left with studies that find an association between disease and low water intake. But are people sick because they drink less or are they drinking less because they’re sick? There have been a few large prospective studies in which fluid intake is measured before disease develops. For example, a Harvard study of 48,000 men found that the risk of bladder cancer decreased by 7% for every extra daily cup of fluid one drinks. Therefore, a high intake of water—like eight cups a day—may reduce the risk of bladder cancer by about 50% (eight cups times 7% per cup), potentially saving thousands of lives.

Probably the best evidence we have for a cut off of water intake comes from theAdventist Health Study, in which 20,000 men and women were studied. About one-half were vegetarian, so they were also getting extra water by eating more fruits and vegetables. Those drinking five or more glasses of water a day had about half the risk of dying from heart disease compared to those who drank two or fewer glasses a day. Like the Harvard study, this protection was found after controlling for other factors such as diet and exercise. These data suggest that it was the water itself that was decreasing risk, perhaps by lowering blood viscosity (blood thickness).

Based on all the best evidence to date, authorities from Europe, the U.S. Institute of Medicine, and the World Health Organization recommend between 2.0 and 2.7 liters (8 to 11 cups) of water a day for women, and 2.5 to 3.7 liters (10 to 15 cups) a day for men. This includes water from all sources, not just beverages. We get about a liter from food and the water our body makes. So this translates into a recommendation for women to drink four to seven cups of water a day and men 6 to 11 cups, assuming only moderate physical activity at moderate ambient temperatures.
We can also get water from all the other drinks we consume, including caffeinated drinks, with the exception of stronger alcoholic drinks like wines and spirits. Beer can leave you with more water than you started with, but wine actively dehydrates you. However, in the cancer and heart disease studies I mentioned above, the benefits were only found with increased water consumption, not other beverages.
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#2
Obligatory xkcd.
[Image: dehydration.png]
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#3
There's no reason why anyone needs to drink water unless they're thirsty. The 8 glasses thing is an old wives tale. "They" claim water flushes out fat, makes your organs and skin healthy. These aren't water soluble. All drinking excess water does is flush out electrolytes, which isn't a good idea. Eat to hunger, drink to thirst. Your body knows what it needs.

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Oh my Jesus, I surrender myself to you. Take care of everything.--Fr Dolindo Ruotolo

Persevere..Eucharist, Holy Rosary, Brown Scapular, Confession. You will win.
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#4
It's my understanding that drinking too much water, besides flushing electrolytes, can over-work the kidneys.  Hyponatremia, anyone?  But then, how much is too much??  As someone else once said somewhere else, "too much of a good thing is not better."
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#5
(08-07-2016, 02:18 PM)J Michael Wrote: It's my understanding that drinking too much water, besides flushing electrolytes, can over-work the kidneys.  Hyponatremia, anyone?  But then, how much is too much??  As someone else once said somewhere else, "too much of a good thing is not better."
Drink to quench your thirst.

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Oh my Jesus, I surrender myself to you. Take care of everything.--Fr Dolindo Ruotolo

Persevere..Eucharist, Holy Rosary, Brown Scapular, Confession. You will win.
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#6
(08-07-2016, 02:38 PM)Jacafamala Wrote:
(08-07-2016, 02:18 PM)J Michael Wrote: It's my understanding that drinking too much water, besides flushing electrolytes, can over-work the kidneys.  Hyponatremia, anyone?  But then, how much is too much??  As someone else once said somewhere else, "too much of a good thing is not better."
Drink to quench your thirst.

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Yup!
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#7
The original study stated 2 litres of water. Since some (small) glasses hold 250ml, the media soon started banding around "8 glasses". However, much has been added to this original claim - for instance, that only pure water and not water in coffee or cola. Yet, the original study even included water in vegetables etc as part of its 2-litre claim.

There is, in fact, a fool-proof method of discovering whether or not you are taking in enough water. At some point during the day, your urine stream should be clear. This is likely to be at some point mid-afternoon, all things being equal. At this stage, your body is letting go of (almost) clear water and therefore has enough of it. Provided you reach this stage at some point during the day, every day, you've no reason to be concerned about your fluid intake.

As has been noted by some posters, it is possible to take on too much water too quickly, although this is where people are gulping down 3+ litres in only a few hours. If you are this thirsty, your body isn't taking in the water quickly enough and upping the quantity isn't going to help. Instead - IF you ARE trying to drink this much - choose a sports drink instead, or use a rehydration sachet … or make your own: 500ml bottle of water, add half a tablespoon of sugar and a quarter of a TEASPOON of salt. Shake vigorously and enjoy.


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#8
(08-07-2016, 02:38 PM)Jacafamala Wrote:
(08-07-2016, 02:18 PM)J Michael Wrote: It's my understanding that drinking too much water, besides flushing electrolytes, can over-work the kidneys.  Hyponatremia, anyone?  But then, how much is too much??  As someone else once said somewhere else, "too much of a good thing is not better."
Drink to quench your thirst.

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Or if you're nursing a baby, drink enough to make sure you have enough milk.

I always find if I'm getting low on fluids, it impacts my milk supply big time even before I feel thirsty. If I notice baby isn't getting as much as they should for that time of day (because supply decreases during the day naturally), I know it's time to have a glass of water even if I'm not quite thirsty yet.
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#9
(08-16-2016, 05:57 PM)PrairieMom Wrote:
(08-07-2016, 02:38 PM)Jacafamala Wrote:
(08-07-2016, 02:18 PM)J Michael Wrote: It's my understanding that drinking too much water, besides flushing electrolytes, can over-work the kidneys.  Hyponatremia, anyone?  But then, how much is too much??  As someone else once said somewhere else, "too much of a good thing is not better."
Drink to quench your thirst.

Sent from my SM-G530T using Tapatalk

Or if you're nursing a baby, drink enough to make sure you have enough milk.

I always find if I'm getting low on fluids, it impacts my milk supply big time even before I feel thirsty. If I notice baby isn't getting as much as they should for that time of day (because supply decreases during the day naturally), I know it's time to have a glass of water even if I'm not quite thirsty yet.


Sent from my SM-G530T using Tapatalk

Oh my Jesus, I surrender myself to you. Take care of everything.--Fr Dolindo Ruotolo

Persevere..Eucharist, Holy Rosary, Brown Scapular, Confession. You will win.
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