Fisheaters easy recipe thread
#41
Chicken-on-a-stick

This is actually a camping favourite because I can get it ready ahead of time and freeze it, and then by the time we're wanting to cook it it's mostly thawed. Then we can cook it over the fire or on the grill (or even in a pan in a pinch).

- some boneless skinless chicken breasts or thighs (your choice), however much you think your family will eat
- wooden bamboo sticks
- salad dressing, either bottled or home made depending on your eating preferences and motivation. I suggest an oil-and-vinegar type like italian, greek, etc.

First, soak your bamboo sticks in water for a couple of hours. This will keep them from catching fire when you cook. Soak more than you need because you can always dry them out again and use later, but if you run out of sticks before chicken you're gonna be hootched.

Meanwhile, cube up your chicken into bite-sized pieces and place in a bowl. Douse with a generous amount of dressing. Let it hang out in the fridge for awhile (the longer the better).

Once you're satisfied your sticks are sufficiently soaked as so not to be a fire hazard and you're chicken's done it's hanging out thing, start putting your chicken on the sticks. It's better not to make it too full (I tend to leave a generous inch or so on either end) or else it gets hard to handle. If you chicken bits are sort of thin and flat, it helps if you fold up your chicken so the stick goes through several times. Keep doing it until you run out of chicken and pray you took out enough sticks in step 1.

Then, cook. We love grilling them, but pretty much any method of heat works. Serve with baked potatoes or rice pilaf and a nice salad.

Freezing instructions: Pretty much the same, except you can skip the marinading step. I just thread the chicken on the sticks and put them in a long ziploc container, then dump the marinade on them and freeze. If I'm really lazy I'll even skip the soaking step, reasoning that enough moisture from the marinade/freeze/thaw cycle will be enough moisture to keep them from spontaneously combusting.
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#42
Fancy cheese and tomatoes

I don't know what it's called but we had it at a party at church on Sunday and it was delicious. The Italian lady who made them was kind enough to tell me how to make it.

Boccachini or small/baby mozza cheese, cut into bite-sized pieces if needed
cherry tomatoes

(note, you should have roughly the same amount of cheese and tomatoes)

EVOO, enough to coat
wine vinegar, just a splash
salt & pepper, a pinch or two
oregano (apparently ONLY home-grown and home-dried will do), whatever looks right
dash cayenne

Basically mix all that together and let it sit in the fridge overnight.

Then put one tomato and one bite of cheese on a fancy toothpick. Keep doing that until you used it all up.

Yum!
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#43
I do a variant on the tomatoes where you slice the tomatoes and lay them on a platter. Sprinkle with mozzarella, then sliced basil. Drizzle with evoo and let sit 30 or so minutes before serving.
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#44
This may be a southern thing (or just a family quirk), but tomatoes also make nice sandwiches with a bit of mayo and some black pepper.
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#45
(01-18-2017, 09:40 PM)In His Love Wrote: This may be a southern thing (or just a family quirk), but tomatoes also make nice sandwiches with a bit of mayo and some black pepper.

Phenomenal. Sliced tomatoes with sliced ham, mayo, and black pepper is truly wonderful. On wonderbread, of course.

How'd you learn of this in Canada? I've never seen it farther north than North Carolina.
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#46
(01-18-2017, 09:53 PM)Jeeter Wrote:
(01-18-2017, 09:40 PM)In His Love Wrote: This may be a southern thing (or just a family quirk), but tomatoes also make nice sandwiches with a bit of mayo and some black pepper.

Phenomenal. Sliced tomatoes with sliced ham, mayo, and black pepper is truly wonderful. On wonderbread, of course.

How'd you learn of this in Canada? I've never seen it farther north than North Carolina.

Tomato sandwiches? We eat them all August and September as the tomatoes ripen.  My grandmother eats radish and/or onion sandwiches, which IMO is weird.

Mmmmm.... now I'm craving a toasted tomato sammy with lots of mayo....
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#47
(01-18-2017, 09:53 PM)Jeeter Wrote:
(01-18-2017, 09:40 PM)In His Love Wrote: This may be a southern thing (or just a family quirk), but tomatoes also make nice sandwiches with a bit of mayo and some black pepper.

Phenomenal. Sliced tomatoes with sliced ham, mayo, and black pepper is truly wonderful. On wonderbread, of course.

How'd you learn of this in Canada? I've never seen it farther north than North Carolina.
I used to live in Georgia. :)
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#48
(01-18-2017, 10:19 PM)PrairieMom Wrote:
(01-18-2017, 09:53 PM)Jeeter Wrote:
(01-18-2017, 09:40 PM)In His Love Wrote: This may be a southern thing (or just a family quirk), but tomatoes also make nice sandwiches with a bit of mayo and some black pepper.

Phenomenal. Sliced tomatoes with sliced ham, mayo, and black pepper is truly wonderful. On wonderbread, of course.

How'd you learn of this in Canada? I've never seen it farther north than North Carolina.

Tomato sandwiches? We eat them all August and September as the tomatoes ripen.  My grandmother eats radish and/or onion sandwiches, which IMO is weird.

Mmmmm.... now I'm craving a toasted tomato sammy with lots of mayo....

With or without ham?  And toasted makes it sound even better. :)

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#49
(01-19-2017, 08:12 AM)Jeeter Wrote: With or without ham?  And toasted makes it sound even better. :)

Not usually ham, but often with bacon. Although ham works in a pinch.
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#50
(01-19-2017, 10:45 AM)PrairieMom Wrote:
(01-19-2017, 08:12 AM)Jeeter Wrote: With or without ham?  And toasted makes it sound even better. :)

Not usually ham, but often with bacon. Although ham works in a pinch.

Bacon makes everything better.  5 Guys will put bacon in milk shakes if you ask. :grin:
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