Native American Tea Cures Cancer. Kept Secret For Over 100 Years!
#11
(12-16-2016, 02:34 PM)J Michael Wrote:
(12-16-2016, 12:50 AM)Poche Wrote:
(12-15-2016, 02:26 PM)J Michael Wrote:
(12-15-2016, 12:33 AM)Poche Wrote: How about sassafras?

How 'bout it??

Sassafras was known primarily as a medicinal herb to the American Indians and, later, to the Europeans, who shipped great quantities to shops in England and on the Continent. The leaves could be made into teas and poultices, while the root bark was either chipped or crushed and then steeped in boiling water—one ounce of bark to one pint of water—and taken in doses of a wineglassful as often as needed to reduce fevers; soothe chronic rheumatism, gout, and dropsy; relieve eye inflammation; ease menstrual and parturition pain; help cure scurvy and various skin conditions; and act as a disinfectant in dental surgery. Because it was thought to be a blood purifier and effective against excess mucus discharge, the plant was even regarded as a cure for syphilis and gonorrhea.

The volatile oil of sassafras, which contains safrole, was also used to combat assorted ailments, the usual dosage being from one to five drops in boiled water. More than this small amount of essence could be dangerous: One teaspoon of the pure oil is enough to cause vomiting, dilated pupils, stupor, spontaneous abortion, collapse, and even death! Despite the possibility of adverse effects from overdoses, however, sassafras oil was often employed as a flavoring. In fact, it was used to cover the taste of opium in potions given to many nineteenth-century children to keep them quiet and "well-behaved."

http://www.motherearthnews.com/organic-g...az83jazshe

Yes, there are literally thousands of herbs with remarkable medicinal (and toxic!) properties.  And many very good herbal materia medicas available with which one can familiarize oneself with them.  Knowing which ones, and how, when, and with whom to use them is an art and science all in itself.  Makes for fascinating study.

Do you have any personal experience yourself, Poche, with sassafras?

Go out into the woods and dig up the roots. taking them home and boiling them to make tea. 
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#12
(12-17-2016, 01:32 AM)Poche Wrote:
(12-16-2016, 02:34 PM)J Michael Wrote:
(12-16-2016, 12:50 AM)Poche Wrote:
(12-15-2016, 02:26 PM)J Michael Wrote:
(12-15-2016, 12:33 AM)Poche Wrote: How about sassafras?

How 'bout it??

Sassafras was known primarily as a medicinal herb to the American Indians and, later, to the Europeans, who shipped great quantities to shops in England and on the Continent. The leaves could be made into teas and poultices, while the root bark was either chipped or crushed and then steeped in boiling water—one ounce of bark to one pint of water—and taken in doses of a wineglassful as often as needed to reduce fevers; soothe chronic rheumatism, gout, and dropsy; relieve eye inflammation; ease menstrual and parturition pain; help cure scurvy and various skin conditions; and act as a disinfectant in dental surgery. Because it was thought to be a blood purifier and effective against excess mucus discharge, the plant was even regarded as a cure for syphilis and gonorrhea.

The volatile oil of sassafras, which contains safrole, was also used to combat assorted ailments, the usual dosage being from one to five drops in boiled water. More than this small amount of essence could be dangerous: One teaspoon of the pure oil is enough to cause vomiting, dilated pupils, stupor, spontaneous abortion, collapse, and even death! Despite the possibility of adverse effects from overdoses, however, sassafras oil was often employed as a flavoring. In fact, it was used to cover the taste of opium in potions given to many nineteenth-century children to keep them quiet and "well-behaved."

http://www.motherearthnews.com/organic-g...az83jazshe

Yes, there are literally thousands of herbs with remarkable medicinal (and toxic!) properties.  And many very good herbal materia medicas available with which one can familiarize oneself with them.  Knowing which ones, and how, when, and with whom to use them is an art and science all in itself.  Makes for fascinating study.

Do you have any personal experience yourself, Poche, with sassafras?

Go out into the woods and dig up the roots. taking them home and boiling them to make tea.

Yes, I know the process.  But you didn't answer my question.
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#13
(12-16-2016, 07:14 PM)Zedta Wrote: Personally, I've only had contact with sassafras as a rather tasty carbonated drink which tastes much like root beer.

Judging from the therapeutic descriptions, described side effects and toxic effects, sassafras sounds a lot like quinine also derived from tree bark.

Root beer IS traditionally made using either sassafras or sarsaparilla.  Yum yum yum yum yum!!!! Smile
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#14
(12-17-2016, 02:58 PM)J Michael Wrote:
(12-17-2016, 01:32 AM)Poche Wrote:
(12-16-2016, 02:34 PM)J Michael Wrote:
(12-16-2016, 12:50 AM)Poche Wrote:
(12-15-2016, 02:26 PM)J Michael Wrote:
(12-15-2016, 12:33 AM)Poche Wrote: How about sassafras?

How 'bout it??

Sassafras was known primarily as a medicinal herb to the American Indians and, later, to the Europeans, who shipped great quantities to shops in England and on the Continent. The leaves could be made into teas and poultices, while the root bark was either chipped or crushed and then steeped in boiling water—one ounce of bark to one pint of water—and taken in doses of a wineglassful as often as needed to reduce fevers; soothe chronic rheumatism, gout, and dropsy; relieve eye inflammation; ease menstrual and parturition pain; help cure scurvy and various skin conditions; and act as a disinfectant in dental surgery. Because it was thought to be a blood purifier and effective against excess mucus discharge, the plant was even regarded as a cure for syphilis and gonorrhea.

The volatile oil of sassafras, which contains safrole, was also used to combat assorted ailments, the usual dosage being from one to five drops in boiled water. More than this small amount of essence could be dangerous: One teaspoon of the pure oil is enough to cause vomiting, dilated pupils, stupor, spontaneous abortion, collapse, and even death! Despite the possibility of adverse effects from overdoses, however, sassafras oil was often employed as a flavoring. In fact, it was used to cover the taste of opium in potions given to many nineteenth-century children to keep them quiet and "well-behaved."

http://www.motherearthnews.com/organic-g...az83jazshe

Yes, there are literally thousands of herbs with remarkable medicinal (and toxic!) properties.  And many very good herbal materia medicas available with which one can familiarize oneself with them.  Knowing which ones, and how, when, and with whom to use them is an art and science all in itself.  Makes for fascinating study.

Do you have any personal experience yourself, Poche, with sassafras?

Go out into the woods and dig up the roots. taking them home and boiling them to make tea.

Yes, I know the process.  But you didn't answer my question.

Yes I have experience with sassafras tea.
Smile Smile Smile
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