Cor Jesu Sacratissimum - the Book
#31
I finally finished it about two weeks ago.  There were many lines/passages that I highlighted and need to go back and synthesize once more.  I also left a review on Amazon, but as I purchased the hard-cover edition, it appears that I'm the only one to have reviewed that version.
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#32
Hi Roger, I've been reading small chunks of pages (not more than 15 at a time) when I have a chance, and every time I do get an opportunity, I very much enjoy it. It gives much food for thought, and hopefully once I have some more time over summer, I'll be able to tackle more of it. Thank you for writing this. It's a very necessary work. I find many, especially younger, traditional Catholics who simply do not understand where we have come from and where we must go in light of the errors of our times, which you touch on in significant ways. I'm looking forward to reading more...
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#33
I too just finished it. It comes from the heart,from lived experience. I have a feeling your book is going to reach a handful of people in profound ways, for others it will make them think. When I get a chance I'll review it on Amazon. :)
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#34
Bonaventure, richgr, formerbuddhist - a quick THANK YOU to all of you for your kind words - amidst a too frenetic pace right now. I hope to say a bit more soon when things slow down. But I deeply appreciate reviews for Amazon. They are more critical than I ever realised in how Amazon's supercomputers promote the book. The more reviews there are, the more those soulless machines work to show the book to potential buyers. So very, very grateful indeed.

Will just add re:
(05-16-2017, 01:08 PM)formerbuddhist Wrote: I too just finished it. It comes from the heart,from lived experience. I have a feeling your book is going to reach a handful of people in profound ways

Thank you - yes, the book is written with 8 years of my lifeblood. And although I always knew it would not be as popular/accessible as the deliberately light approach of The Gentle Traditionalist, it does seem already that more than a handful of people have been hit by it in quite deep ways and prefer it to TGT.  I am very grateful for this.

More to say soon (-ish) . . .
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#35
As I was reading my weekly of The Wanderer, I was pleasantly surprised to come across this book review of Cor Jesu Sacratissimum. 

It was, more or less, favorable, but I think the author was a bit biased, especially with comments such as the following:

Quote:"...he is rather critical of aspects of Vatican II, but in a sense this is to be expected in someone who has obviously moved from an extreme New Age position into the Church.  His present position is clearly a reaction against his previous beliefs.
...
"He also speaks of the widespread liturgical abuse he has experienced on his travels in Europe and America, and argues for a return to the Old Rite. But of course it could equally be argued that what is required is not so much a return to that but an emphasis on making the New Rite more reverent."
...
"Like many traditionalists, the author seems to believe that the 'collapse' of the Church 'has everything to do with the collapse of the liturgy.'  It is arguable, though, that this is going too far and that there are other factors responsible for the great decline in Catholic practice in recent years."
...
"
The author is nostalgic for nineteenth-century French Catholicism, but surely we can’t turn the clock back — rather we should be building a new Civilization of Life and Love in the Church as she is, praying and working for renewal."

The last point is what I really contend: over and over I hear how the clock can never be turned back, so why bother?  While one obviously can not turn back the clock, that's not at all the vibe I got from reading Roger's book.  To the contrary, what is suggested is a return to a certain spiritual and Catholic culture, which IMO is not directly suggesting that the clock to be turned back.  Instead, it is an admonishment that our present direction, our spiritual compass, is off kilter and needs resetting back to the true spiritual north.
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#36
(11-23-2017, 11:41 AM)Bonaventure Wrote: As I was reading my weekly of The Wanderer, I was pleasantly surprised to come across this book review of Cor Jesu Sacratissimum. 

It was, more or less, favorable, but I think the author was a bit biased, especially with comments such as the following:

Quote:"...he is rather critical of aspects of Vatican II, but in a sense this is to be expected in someone who has obviously moved from an extreme New Age position into the Church.  His present position is clearly a reaction against his previous beliefs.
...
"He also speaks of the widespread liturgical abuse he has experienced on his travels in Europe and America, and argues for a return to the Old Rite. But of course it could equally be argued that what is required is not so much a return to that but an emphasis on making the New Rite more reverent."
...
"Like many traditionalists, the author seems to believe that the 'collapse' of the Church 'has everything to do with the collapse of the liturgy.'  It is arguable, though, that this is going too far and that there are other factors responsible for the great decline in Catholic practice in recent years."
...
"
The author is nostalgic for nineteenth-century French Catholicism, but surely we can’t turn the clock back — rather we should be building a new Civilization of Life and Love in the Church as she is, praying and working for renewal."

The last point is what I really contend: over and over I hear how the clock can never be turned back, so why bother?  While one obviously can not turn back the clock, that's not at all the vibe I got from reading Roger's book.  To the contrary, what is suggested is a return to a certain spiritual and Catholic culture, which IMO is not directly suggesting that the clock to be turned back.  Instead, it is an admonishment that our present direction, our spiritual compass, is off kilter and needs resetting back to the true spiritual north.

The last point reminds me of the following quote by Chesterton:

There is one metaphor of which the moderns are very fond; they are always saying, "You can't put the clock back." The simple and obvious answer is "You can." A clock, being a piece of human construction, can be restored by the human finger to any figure or hour. In the same way society, being a piece of human construction, can be reconstructed upon any plan that has ever existed.
"Cor Jesu Rex Et Centrum Omnium Cordium, miserére nobis "

“To pray is to shed blood.” - Silouan the Athonite
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#37
Darn, JosefSilouan! As I was reading this thread, I got to Bonaventure's post and, before reading yours, I went to my blog where I had blogged the full quote just yesterday. As I pulled down to make a new reply, I saw that you had already quoted Chesterton.

Here is a longer passage incorporating the part you posted.

Quote:"THE really courageous man is he who defies tyrannies young as the morning and superstitions fresh as the first flowers. The only true free-thinker is he whose intellect is as much free from the future as from the past. He cares as little for what will be as for what has been; he cares only for what ought to be. And for my present purpose I specially insist on this abstract independence. If I am to discuss what is wrong, one of the first things that are wrong is this: the deep and silent modern assumption that past things have become impossible. There is one metaphor of which the moderns are very fond; they are always saying, "You can't put the clock back." The simple and obvious answer is "You can." A clock, being a piece of human construction, can be restored by the human finger to any figure or hour. In the same way society, being a piece of human construction, can be reconstructed upon any plan that has ever existed."



~G.K. Chesterton: What's Wrong With the World, Part One, Chap. IV.
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#38
Belated gratitude indeed, for this Bonaventure!

And especially what I put in bold red


(11-23-2017, 11:41 AM)Bonaventure Wrote: As I was reading my weekly of The Wanderer, I was pleasantly surprised to come across this book review of Cor Jesu Sacratissimum. 

It was, more or less, favorable, but I think the author was a bit biased, especially with comments such as the following:

Quote:"...he is rather critical of aspects of Vatican II, but in a sense this is to be expected in someone who has obviously moved from an extreme New Age position into the Church.  His present position is clearly a reaction against his previous beliefs.
...
"He also speaks of the widespread liturgical abuse he has experienced on his travels in Europe and America, and argues for a return to the Old Rite. But of course it could equally be argued that what is required is not so much a return to that but an emphasis on making the New Rite more reverent."
...
"Like many traditionalists, the author seems to believe that the 'collapse' of the Church 'has everything to do with the collapse of the liturgy.'  It is arguable, though, that this is going too far and that there are other factors responsible for the great decline in Catholic practice in recent years."
...
"
The author is nostalgic for nineteenth-century French Catholicism, but surely we can’t turn the clock back — rather we should be building a new Civilization of Life and Love in the Church as she is, praying and working for renewal."

The last point is what I really contend: over and over I hear how the clock can never be turned back, so why bother?  While one obviously can not turn back the clock, that's not at all the vibe I got from reading Roger's book.  To the contrary, what is suggested is a return to a certain spiritual and Catholic culture, which IMO is not directly suggesting that the clock to be turned back.  Instead, it is an admonishment that our present direction, our spiritual compass, is off kilter and needs resetting back to the true spiritual north.



I do feel GOT by you and I am most grateful.  :)  :)  :)

As for the review, I'm struggling to know what to say. I'm glad for it, glad he engaged with me. But I do tend to imagine that the very comments you highlight arise from a certain irritation that has stopped the reviewer from getting to the core of the book.

There seems to be a need to attribute things to me like "nostalgia" and "swinging from extreme to the other".

But I reject that. A key to the book is that it took me over ten years to make that supposed "swing". As you'll know, I was an incredibly liberal Catholic for years. Even called myself a "New Age Catholic"!!

But years of really quite tortured questioning and self-questioning, culminating in my experiences in Paray-le-Monial, France (where St Margaret Mary Alacoque saw the Sacred Heart of Jesus) led to the positions I now take.

Not nostalgia for turning back the clock ... 

But maybe I'm being too defensive, irritated, myself. Not sure I should say more ... though I may do. :P
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#39
"Like many traditionalists, the author seems to believe that the 'collapse' of the Church 'has everything to do with the collapse of the liturgy.'  It is arguable, though, that this is going too far and that there are other factors responsible for the great decline in Catholic practice in recent years."

Well, I mean, our last Pope said the following: "I am convinced that the crisis in the Church that we are experiencing today is to a large extent due to the disintegration of the liturgy." 

Pope Pius XII said, "I am concerned about the confidences of the Virgin to the little Lucia of Fatima. This persistence of the Good Lady in face of the danger that threatens the Church is a divine warning against the suicide that the alteration of the Faith, in its liturgy, its theology, and its soul, would represent"

I'd say your belief is on a pretty solid foundation, Roger.
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#40
(11-27-2017, 09:25 AM)In His Love Wrote: "Like many traditionalists, the author seems to believe that the 'collapse' of the Church 'has everything to do with the collapse of the liturgy.'  It is arguable, though, that this is going too far and that there are other factors responsible for the great decline in Catholic practice in recent years."

Well, I mean, our last Pope said the following: "I am convinced that the crisis in the Church that we are experiencing today is to a large extent due to the disintegration of the liturgy." 

Pope Pius XII said, "I am concerned about the confidences of the Virgin to the little Lucia of Fatima. This persistence of the Good Lady in face of the danger that threatens the Church is a divine warning against the suicide that the alteration of the Faith, in its liturgy, its theology, and its soul, would represent"

I'd say your belief is on a pretty solid foundation, Roger.



Thanks, IHL!

I didn't know that Ven. Pius XII quote and it is VERY good to have that now.

As for the BXVI quote, I actually have that one in the book. (Although the words are slightly different, as the original was in German and it gets translated differently by different people in English.)

I even made a pin of that quote. If anyone wants to use it, please do!



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