The Best Breviary
#1
Hello!

I am looking for a traditional breviary to pray from. 

Right now I am considering between these:

The Roman Breviary (which edition, the Angelus Press version or the Baronius version?)

The Benedictine Monastic Diurnal (Saint Michael's Abbey) and Matins with the Lancelot Andrews Press version (side not, is this an Anglican edition ???)

Any feedback would be very helpful!

Thank you :) :)
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#2
Lancelot Andrewes is a Western Rite Orthodox publisher; their diurnal and the Matins book are reprints of Anglican editions. I have never used the Matins book, but the diurnal is really nice. Definitely a manageable volume, certainly the most portable of the options you list.

I think it primarily depends on whether your Latin is strong enough to pray Latin alone (Angelus) or need English as a crutch (Baronius or St Michael) or English entirely (Lancelot Andrewes).
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#3
I will probably go with the Diurnal, being that it is the cheaper and the more portable, and correct me if I am wrong, but I read that the ordering of the psalms is older than that of the 1961 Roman Breviary.  If I did the diurnal I would probably use the Matins Book in conjunction.  The only worry about that however, is would it be right to use a breviary that uses an Anglican translation published by the Orthodox (I don't have some bent against them, I am just wondering if their books would be an accurate reproduction of what Benedictines would have prayed for the last 1400 years?)

Thank you again for the advice, that really does help  :grin: :grin: 
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#4
I would personally choose the Angelus Press version then perhaps the Baronius as a secondary choice. I currently own neither.

There are other options...

There is an app called "Brevarium" which is quite good. It's totally free and helps you familiarize yourself with the traditional breviary. Since it requires no page flipping, you don't need any familiarity with the rubrics and ranking of feast days nor do you need a supplemental martyrology for Prime. Everything is in order. You might consider that before you spend money on an actual book.

There is also a book titled "Lauds, Vespers, Compline" published in 1965 which I bet you could find. The translation is not great and you see the beginnings of the LOTH in it but it is still the traditional breviary. I have two, actually.

In fact, there are a number of English translations published between 1962 and 1969 before the LOTH came out.
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#5
(12-15-2016, 11:56 PM)Justin Alphonsus Wrote: I will probably go with the Diurnal, being that it is the cheaper and the more portable, and correct me if I am wrong, but I read that the ordering of the psalms is older than that of the 1961 Roman Breviary.  If I did the diurnal I would probably use the Matins Book in conjunction.  The only worry about that however, is would it be right to use a breviary that uses an Anglican translation published by the Orthodox (I don't have some bent against them, I am just wondering if their books would be an accurate reproduction of what Benedictines would have prayed for the last 1400 years?)

Thank you again for the advice, that really does help  :grin: :grin:

Yes the ordering is older than that if the 1960 breviary, which does not predate the reforms of St. Pius X. There is some debate over whether the Benedictine or truly traditional Roman order is older, but they are both ancient. Some people are totally opposed to any non-Catholic prayerbook, which I think is generally reasonable, but in this case, the content is thoroughly Catholic, being a translation of a Catholic book. The Diurnal's translation of the collects is much more literal than the Anglican Breviary, which has been recommended by priests of the FSSP before. That's also an option worth considering. It's a single volume, but is not as portable.
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#6
Thank you for the help!!
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#7
I would stick to what is Catholic, between the things you mentioned, that would be the breviary.
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