Epiphany Day of Obligation in US?
#11
(01-05-2017, 08:22 AM)Jeeter Wrote:
(01-05-2017, 12:20 AM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: The Epiphany is not a day of obligation in the U.S.

It is in the Universal Church, but it has never been of obligation in the U.S.

Instead in the U.S. we've kept the Octave of the Nativity (aka Circumcision or Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God) is a holy day of obligation, whereas it is not obligatory in the Universal Church.

Not to sound ignorant, but does this mean that individual nations can choose certain days of obligation?  ???

They can with the permission of the Holy See.
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#12
(01-06-2017, 12:24 AM)Poche Wrote: I can remember a time when the Feast of the Epiphany was a holy day of obligation in the US.

Wow, you must be ancient! At least since Fr Lasance published 'My Prayer-Book' in 1908, the Holy Days of Obligation have been all Sundays of the year, 1 January (Circumcision, or whatever it's being called this week in the NO!), Ascension Day, the Assumption, All Saints, Immaculate Conception, and Christmas Day, all six of which remain in the US, tho' several have been transferred with permission of the Holy See.

In 1908, however. Epiphany was a Day of Obligation in Canada. along with all Sundays, Circumcision, Ascension, All Saints, Immaculate Conception, and Christmas. Since then, with the permission of the Holy See, the Canadian Bishops have reduced this list to three, all Sundays, Christmas and Circumcision,
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#13
(01-07-2017, 12:18 AM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(01-06-2017, 12:24 AM)Poche Wrote: I can remember a time when the Feast of the Epiphany was a holy day of obligation in the US.

Wow, you must be ancient! At least since Fr Lasance published 'My Prayer-Book' in 1908, the Holy Days of Obligation have been all Sundays of the year, 1 January (Circumcision, or whatever it's being called this week in the NO!), Ascension Day, the Assumption, All Saints, Immaculate Conception, and Christmas Day, all six of which remain in the US, tho' several have been transferred with permission of the Holy See.

In 1908, however. Epiphany was a Day of Obligation in Canada. along with all Sundays, Circumcision, Ascension, All Saints, Immaculate Conception, and Christmas. Since then, with the permission of the Holy See, the Canadian Bishops have reduced this list to three, all Sundays, Christmas and Circumcision,

Since the new calendar in 1969, Epiphany in the U.S. is always transferred to the a Sunday, so it's a tautology to say Epiphany is a day of obligation (since Sunday always is). In fact when Paul VI issued the general norms for the new calendar it read "Where the Solemnities of the Epiphany, the Ascension and the Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ are not observed as Holydays of Obligation, they should be assigned
to a Sunday as their proper day in this manner ... the Epiphany is assigned to the Sunday that falls between 2 January and 8 January..."

Thus, in the US it is not a day of obligation, since it is assigned permanently to a Sunday.

I have failed to find any source to suggest that the Epiphany was ever observed as a day of obligation in the US, and many catechetical and liturgical sources which list days of obligations and never mention the Epiphany.
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#14
Thank you all for clarifying that for me.
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#15
(01-07-2017, 02:45 AM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: I have failed to find any source to suggest that the Epiphany was ever observed as a day of obligation in the US, and many catechetical and liturgical sources which list days of obligations and never mention the Epiphany.

MM, that's what I thought, but the earliest source I had easily at hand was Fr Lasance. And thanks for clearing up my rather garbled attempt at explanation.
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#16
(01-07-2017, 12:18 AM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(01-06-2017, 12:24 AM)Poche Wrote: I can remember a time when the Feast of the Epiphany was a holy day of obligation in the US.

Wow, you must be ancient! At least since Fr Lasance published 'My Prayer-Book' in 1908, the Holy Days of Obligation have been all Sundays of the year, 1 January (Circumcision, or whatever it's being called this week in the NO!), Ascension Day, the Assumption, All Saints, Immaculate Conception, and Christmas Day, all six of which remain in the US, tho' several have been transferred with permission of the Holy See.

In 1908, however. Epiphany was a Day of Obligation in Canada. along with all Sundays, Circumcision, Ascension, All Saints, Immaculate Conception, and Christmas. Since then, with the permission of the Holy See, the Canadian Bishops have reduced this list to three, all Sundays, Christmas and Circumcision,

I remember on the Sunday before January 6 the priest announcing that the Epiphany was a holy day of obligation with the obligation to go to mass on that day.
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#17
(01-07-2017, 02:45 AM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: I have failed to find any source to suggest that the Epiphany was ever observed as a day of obligation in the US, and many catechetical and liturgical sources which list days of obligations and never mention the Epiphany.

Epiphany (aka Theophany) is a day of obligation in the U.S. for Greek Catholics.

Ironically, liturgy was cancelled at our parish due to inclement weather, so we, too, will be celebrating it on Sunday.
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