Please critique my diet
#1
I've been on this diet since last Lent.  I've been doing so well on it that I decided to extend it past Lent.  It's not specifically designed to lose weight, though it does certainly help with that; it's more focused on just healthy eating.  Basically it's a diet that's gluten-free, nearly meat-free, and heavy on greens, fish, nuts, and fruits.  The main carbs are potatoes, sweet potatoes, and brown rice.  Plus it's entirely free of preservatives and additives - yes, we read the labels on everything we buy.  So no bread, junk food, coffee, sodas, sugar, flour, table salt, dairy (for the most part), chocolate, alcoholic drinks, etc.  We only cook with extra virgin olive oil, (unsalted) butter, and sea salt.

I go completely vegan on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays; I eat fish (and seafood) on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, so basically Lenten food; I eat meat on Sundays.  The only time I break this rule is when we eat out, and even then, I keep track and make up for it with a vegan or fish day later.

I definitely feel much better on this diet, compared to the terrible bachelor diet I was on before I got married.  I think I've lost 20 pounds since our wedding, though my poor wife thinks she's doing a bad job, because she's failed to fatten me up!  I'm enjoying this diet, but as you can imagine, although it's been good for me, it's been tough on my wife, who has to make all this for me - I'm blessed with a wonderful wife who cooks for me and puts up with my diet!

But honestly, I couldn't gain weight on this diet if I tried.  The only other drawback is that it's expensive.  It's just so expensive to eat healthy in this country (United States).  It's not like we buy everything organic, but even so, the grocery bill adds up.  I don't think I can keep up this diet when more kids come along, but I'm gonna milk it for as long as I can!

And yes, input and suggestions are welcome.  Thanks!
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#2
You essentially eat as I do, except: I use Virgin Olive oil, because it has a better taste, I eat bread for breakfast, but only Ezekiel Bread toasted (sometimes as a treat I'll add some peanut butter- only peanuts and salt kind- and some Polaner all-fruit jelly), I don't eat as much fish and its usually Salmon and I eat pork a couple of days a week. I eat eggs (my own chickens), cheese (less that weekly) and half and half in my coffee (daily), I sweeten with Stavia, my te is iced and straight up or with a half a lemon's worth of juice from my lemon tree and my butter is salted. I have wine on occasion, as in once a month or so and an (as in one) occasional beer as well. I snack on nuts and air popped popcorn with salt and olive oil. I eat chicken, white meat and baked about twice a week, beef quite rarely. like once a month or less and only red potatoes or sweet potatoes. I love my greens and beans and black-eyed peas too and most all veggies, especially avacados, but stay away from grains, with only a very rare bowl of oatmeal. NO soy thank you. I am allergic (thankfully). The stuff is highly GMO and loaded with toxic chemicals and not eaten as in the Oriental diet does: Fermented.

Oh yeah, I LOVE my Chimayo Chili pods and powder and dried green chili too!
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#3
(01-08-2017, 07:15 PM)Zedta Wrote: You essentially eat as I do, except: I use Virgin Olive oil, because it has a better taste, I eat bread for breakfast, but only Ezekiel Bread toasted (sometimes as a treat I'll add some peanut butter- only peanuts and salt kind- and some Polaner all-fruit jelly), I don't eat as much fish and its usually Salmon and I eat pork a couple of days a week. I eat eggs (my own chickens), cheese (less that weekly) and half and half in my coffee (daily), I sweeten with Stavia, my te is iced and straight up or with a half a lemon's worth of juice from my lemon tree and my butter is salted. I have wine on occasion, as in once a month or so and an (as in one) occasional beer as well. I snack on nuts and air popped popcorn with salt and olive oil. I eat chicken, white meat and baked about twice a week, beef quite rarely. like once a month or less and only red potatoes or sweet potatoes. I love my greens and beans and black-eyed peas too and most all veggies, especially avacados, but stay away from grains, with only a very rare bowl of oatmeal. NO soy thank you. I am allergic (thankfully). The stuff is highly GMO and loaded with toxic chemicals and not eaten as in the Oriental diet does: Fermented.

Oh yeah, I LOVE my Chimayo Chili pods and powder and dried green chili too!

Cool diet!  It's always nice to meet someone else who's also trying to eat healthy.  I haven't heard of the Polaner brand before.  Is it available in grocery stores, or is it available online perhaps?  I might just eat it by itself (with peanut butter) instead of putting it on bread.  I used to love avocados, but have since developed a somewhat allergic reaction to them - I get a stomach ache after eating them for some reason.

On the occasions that I do eat meat, it's usually chicken or beef, but mostly chicken.  Every once in a while, we'd have lamb, but it's expensive, so it's a treat.  As for fish, I eat a variety of them, like salmon, whiting, sardines, catfish, cod, etc.  We live in New Jersey, so we're blessed with a relative abundance of fish, though it can get spendy.  We just get whatever's on sale.  Rarely fresh fish; mostly packaged frozen fish.  I also eat mussels and shrimp.  My wife actually makes a pretty good clam chowder, but since it has flour in it, we haven't had it in a long while.  Maybe whole-grain flour might be okay, but it also has dairy (cream) in it.

I think eating healthy has become somewhat of a hobby to me; it's almost like I'm addicted to eating healthy!  It's a positive cycle - healthy eating makes you feel better, which makes you want to keep eating healthy.  It's actually kind of funny that my wife is the one who tried really hard to get me to eat healthy when we got married, and now I eat healthier than she does, and I lecture her on eating healthy.  She says she's created a monster!  Haha!
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#4
Kudos to you on being able to keep up this diet. We tried it for about 2 weeks and it drove me insane as the family chef. So now we just buy fresh stuff and try not to deep fry stuff (Twinkies, bananas, and Snickers are delicious deep fried, oranges not so much :grin:).

Quote:My wife actually makes a pretty good clam chowder, but since it has flour in it, we haven't had it in a long while.

Have you looked into rice flour? We tried almond as a substitute, but it's REALLY gritty.
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#5
(01-19-2017, 09:19 PM)Jeeter Wrote: Kudos to you on being able to keep up this diet. We tried it for about 2 weeks and it drove me insane as the family chef. So now we just buy fresh stuff and try not to deep fry stuff (Twinkies, bananas, and Snickers are delicious deep fried, oranges not so much :grin:).

Quote:My wife actually makes a pretty good clam chowder, but since it has flour in it, we haven't had it in a long while.

Have you looked into rice flour? We tried almond as a substitute, but it's REALLY gritty.

The best substitute for those types of applications is something called glutinous rice flour (note: it contains no gluten). This is the one I usually buy:

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You can usually get it cheap in the Asian/ethnic section of the store, maybe a buck a bag if that. It has about the same thickening power as cornstarch, but with a consistency more like white wheat flour. Not great if you're looking to avoid refined flour, but good if you need to avoid gluten. You're only using a couple of tablespoons at best for thickening, so as an indulgence it might be acceptable.

I've also found that for soups, etc, coconut milk gives the best texture and taste. It would be fabulous in something like a chowder.

We did gluten/dairy free for years.
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#6
(01-19-2017, 09:19 PM)Jeeter Wrote: Kudos to you on being able to keep up this diet. We tried it for about 2 weeks and it drove me insane as the family chef. So now we just buy fresh stuff and try not to deep fry stuff (Twinkies, bananas, and Snickers are delicious deep fried, oranges not so much :grin:).

Yea, it's not the easiest diet to keep.  It's actually kinda funny, because when we first got married, my wife tried really hard to get me to eat healthier; now that I'm completely on board, she complains that I'm being too strict and says she's created a monster!  I have to say, eating healthy is kind of addictive.

(01-19-2017, 09:19 PM)Jeeter Wrote: Have you looked into rice flour? We tried almond as a substitute, but it's REALLY gritty.

Yea, we like almond flour, though we don't use it as much as we should.  Almonds are kind of expensive, too, but very tasty, especially the dry-roasted kind with sea salt!

(01-20-2017, 12:03 AM)PrairieMom Wrote: The best substitute for those types of applications is something called glutinous rice flour (note: it contains no gluten).

We've thought about using brown rice flour before, but it's still flour, so I'm a little iffy.  Maybe a little bit wouldn't hurt?
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#7
(01-21-2017, 11:19 AM)AllSeasons Wrote:
(01-20-2017, 12:03 AM)PrairieMom Wrote: The best substitute for those types of applications is something called glutinous rice flour (note: it contains no gluten).

We've thought about using brown rice flour before, but it's still flour, so I'm a little iffy.  Maybe a little bit wouldn't hurt?

Brown rice flour will also be gritty. Basically any kind of flour/starch that has the germ intact will be gritty, and any flour or starch not ground fine enough will be gritty. Non-wheat flours are very persnickity that way. It was years of experimentation before I stumbled on using glutinous rice flour. It has the germ removed and is super-fine ground, and the properties of the rice are such that it bonds well in suspension. We are no longer gluten-free, but we actually still use it for gravy, etc because we prefer it's texture.

But yeah, sometimes it's about balance. A pan of gravy made from browned meat drippings and vegetable water and some spices will only require a tablespoon or two of thickener. Any one person will only eat a fraction of that. For a treat a few times a year, it might be okay. It works well for dredging too if you have anything that you want to prepare that way, although the grittier flours work alright for that most of the time (I've never tried almond because we have nut allergies, and coconut tastes weird, but the others are okay. I hate teff or teff blends because they just taste off to me. Soroghum and soroghum blends are exceptionally good-tasting).

(01-21-2017, 11:19 AM)AllSeasons Wrote: Yea, we like almond flour, though we don't use it as much as we should.  Almonds are kind of expensive, too, but very tasty, especially the dry-roasted kind with sea salt!

Almonds are an excellent choice for nutrition, as they pack a lot of nutrition in a very small quantity. They do seem expensive, but when you realize that a portion of almonds is only 1 oz (about 1/4-1/3 of a cup, so a small handful or a mini Tupperware container full), a little bit of almond goes a long way. It's like meat - people complain it's expensive, but when you realize how small a proper portion actually is and most adults only require 2 portions of protein a day, it suddenly becomes much more doable. So a handful of almonds and playing-card sized piece of meat, or a handful of almonds and 2 eggs, and you're met your protein requirements for the day.

One thing about almonds too is that they're very water-intensive and grow in a region where water is becoming increasingly scarce. Lots of people are eschewing meat these days because of environmental concerns, only to replace meat with things like almonds. It's one of the most water-intensive non-meat crops you can grow. So from an environmental and sustainability perspective, there are much better crops you could be choosing to consume instead.
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