Pope accuses Christians of ‘cowardliness’ for overfocus on Commandments
#21
I think I have figured out why making annulments easier (The "mental" reasons) led to a huge increase in divorces.  And I think I also understand why Vietnam and India both have such low divorce rates.  I think it is remarriage.

Making annulments easier made remarriage easier.  They were not restricted to only marrying outside of the Catholic church. 

The second, and third, forth, etc. marriages had a greater chance of failure than the first.  So the kids grew up experiencing multiple divorces and remarriages.  It was all part of "normal" life for them.  And as adults they too got divorced.

An aspect of the culture in Asia that is different than in the West is that the Buddhist men rarely marry divorced women with children.  If a woman divorces over there she probably won't remarry.  So the kids grow up seeing their parents work through conflicts and problems -- and stay married.  They grow up in a more secure environment and view marriage as something that is permanent.

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#22
(02-06-2017, 02:37 PM)RichardP Wrote: I think I have figured out why making annulments easier (The "mental" reasons) led to a huge increase in divorces.  And I think I also understand why Vietnam and India both have such low divorce rates.  I think it is remarriage.

Making annulments easier made remarriage easier.  They were not restricted to only marrying outside of the Catholic church. 

The second, and third, forth, etc. marriages had a greater chance of failure than the first.  So the kids grew up experiencing multiple divorces and remarriages.  It was all part of "normal" life for them.  And as adults they too got divorced.

An aspect of the culture in Asia that is different than in the West is that the Buddhist men rarely marry divorced women with children.  If a woman divorces over there she probably won't remarry.  So the kids grow up seeing their parents work through conflicts and problems -- and stay married.  They grow up in a more secure environment and view marriage as something that is permanent.

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I think you may be over simplifying this analysis. I work with many Asian Indians and have been India multiple times. Most marriages in India are arranged, the intent from the beginning is to get married and stay married; working through issues is assumed. The expectations are set from the beginning and supported by the culture.

Going back to the comment I made a few days ago about catechesis, when the expectation is of marriage is set properly and supported by the culture there are less divorces. Remarriage is a symptom of the problem of incorrect expectations in marriage. I agree with you that easing annulments are a reaction to the overall problem of more divorces; again it is an attempt to address the symptom.
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#23
(02-06-2017, 03:22 PM)CaptCrunch73 Wrote:
(02-06-2017, 02:37 PM)RichardP Wrote: I think I have figured out why making annulments easier (The "mental" reasons) led to a huge increase in divorces.  And I think I also understand why Vietnam and India both have such low divorce rates.  I think it is remarriage.

Making annulments easier made remarriage easier.  They were not restricted to only marrying outside of the Catholic church. 

The second, and third, forth, etc. marriages had a greater chance of failure than the first.  So the kids grew up experiencing multiple divorces and remarriages.  It was all part of "normal" life for them.  And as adults they too got divorced.

An aspect of the culture in Asia that is different than in the West is that the Buddhist men rarely marry divorced women with children.  If a woman divorces over there she probably won't remarry.  So the kids grow up seeing their parents work through conflicts and problems -- and stay married.  They grow up in a more secure environment and view marriage as something that is permanent.

Sent from my SGH-M919 using Tapatalk

I think you may be over simplifying this analysis. I work with many Asian Indians and have been India multiple times. Most marriages in India are arranged, the intent from the beginning is to get married and stay married; working through issues is assumed. The expectations are set from the beginning and supported by the culture.

Going back to the comment I made a few days ago about catechesis, when the expectation is of marriage is set properly and supported by the culture there are less divorces. Remarriage is a symptom of the problem of incorrect expectations in marriage. I agree with you that easing annulments are a reaction to the overall problem of more divorces; again it is an attempt to address the symptom.
That's a good point.  I wasn't considering that the marriages were arranged and the community involvement.

But have you ever heard of, or seen, an arranged marriage between a young single man and a divorced woman with kids? Or are all of the arranged marriages between single men (no kids), and single women (no kids)?

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#24
(02-07-2017, 02:58 PM)RichardP Wrote:
(02-06-2017, 03:22 PM)CaptCrunch73 Wrote:
(02-06-2017, 02:37 PM)RichardP Wrote: I think I have figured out why making annulments easier (The "mental" reasons) led to a huge increase in divorces.  And I think I also understand why Vietnam and India both have such low divorce rates.  I think it is remarriage.

Making annulments easier made remarriage easier.  They were not restricted to only marrying outside of the Catholic church. 

The second, and third, forth, etc. marriages had a greater chance of failure than the first.  So the kids grew up experiencing multiple divorces and remarriages.  It was all part of "normal" life for them.  And as adults they too got divorced.

An aspect of the culture in Asia that is different than in the West is that the Buddhist men rarely marry divorced women with children.  If a woman divorces over there she probably won't remarry.  So the kids grow up seeing their parents work through conflicts and problems -- and stay married.  They grow up in a more secure environment and view marriage as something that is permanent.

Sent from my SGH-M919 using Tapatalk

I think you may be over simplifying this analysis. I work with many Asian Indians and have been India multiple times. Most marriages in India are arranged, the intent from the beginning is to get married and stay married; working through issues is assumed. The expectations are set from the beginning and supported by the culture.

Going back to the comment I made a few days ago about catechesis, when the expectation is of marriage is set properly and supported by the culture there are less divorces. Remarriage is a symptom of the problem of incorrect expectations in marriage. I agree with you that easing annulments are a reaction to the overall problem of more divorces; again it is an attempt to address the symptom.
That's a good point.  I wasn't considering that the marriages were arranged and the community involvement.

But have you ever heard of, or seen, an arranged marriage between a young single man and a divorced woman with kids? Or are all of the arranged marriages between single men (no kids), and single women (no kids)?

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Seeing how many arranged marriages are in fact arranged in childhood or before the person is even old enough to date, I think the likelihood of an arranged marriage with a divorced woman is very low. It simply isn't an option in that culture.
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#25
I think that His Holiness is being taken out of context. His criticism could also be applied to those prince like powers that be who mouth the words "reform" and "renewal" but then oppose the legitimate renewal that comes from the legitimate celebration of the TLM.
 
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