9th February - National Bagel Day
#1
A Polish friend has sent me this info (no credits, so how true?):

Bagels are said to have been created in 1683 to honor the King of Poland, John III (Sobieski) after he protected the Austrian people from an attack by Turkish invaders. The first bagels were stirrup-shaped to praise the horsemen who saved the country. The word "bagel" came from the Austrian word for stirrup or bracelet which was "beugel". The hole in the middle was put there to help string them on a pole to carry them. Americans called it "an unsweetened doughnut with rigor mortis" . The international Bagel Bakers Union was formed in New York in 1907. The dough is first boiled before being cooked. It used to be a four-man job. Two to form the dough, a "Kettleman" to boil it, and an "Oven-man" to bake it.
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#2
I'm not an expert on the subject but I did research on the importance of breads in Slavic culture for a fun sociological paper.

The story of Jan III Sobieski's relation to the bagel has no sources because it is a legend that has developed over the centuries. So, while it cannot be completely disproved, it is generally accepted as folklore. Bagels showed up on the scene years before 1683. In fact, mention was made of them in records in Kraków in 1610. They were supposed to be gifted to pregnant women. Prior to the bagel we know, its relative the obwarzanki, has been known since the 1300s and is really quite similar in that it is also boiled, hard on the outside and chewy in the middle.

If you want to read more about it, there is a book all about bagels. It's called The Bagel: The Surprising History of a Modest Bread  by Maria Balinska.
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#3
(02-22-2017, 01:06 PM)Zubr Wrote: I'm not an expert on the subject but I did research on the importance of breads in Slavic culture for a fun sociological paper.

The story of Jan III Sobieski's relation to the bagel has no sources because it is a legend that has developed over the centuries. So, while it cannot be completely disproved, it is generally accepted as folklore. Bagels showed up on the scene years before 1683. In fact, mention was made of them in records in Kraków in 1610. They were supposed to be gifted to pregnant women. Prior to the bagel we know, its relative the obwarzanki, has been known since the 1300s and is really quite similar in that it is also boiled, hard on the outside and chewy in the middle.

If you want to read more about it, there is a book all about bagels. It's called The Bagel: The Surprising History of a Modest Bread  by Maria Balinska.
  Thanks for this! You are probably correct. But can I tell my Polish friend that a correction has come from the Russian Federation? She will eat me alive! God bless!
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#4
(02-22-2017, 08:44 PM)francisco Wrote: Thanks for this! You are probably correct. But can I tell my Polish friend that a correction has come from the Russian Federation? She will eat me alive! God bless!
:LOL:  Oh my!  Sure, you may tell her if you desire comedic relief, but I hold no responsibility for her reaction! As an act of diplomacy, you can say this Russian thinks pączki are awesome.  :grin: 
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