Pope says better an atheist than a Catholic living a double life
#1
How on earth could it ever be considered "better" to be someone who doesn't believe in or pray to God than to be a Catholic who is struggling with sin like any other Catholic, to a greater or lesser degree? That said, it's difficult to tell if the Pope was in complete agreement with that statement or simply using it as part his an explanation of the harm of scandal.

From Crux:

"Pope Francis on Thursday denounced Catholics living what he called a “double life”, meaning such hypocrisy as going to Mass and participating in different Church associations, but then not paying fair wages to employees or laundering money.

Addressing those present in his daily morning Mass on Thursday, Francis asked them how many times they had heard someone saying, “But to be a Catholic like him, better to be an atheist!”"

More here:

https://cruxnow.com/vatican/2017/02/23/p...uble-life/

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#2
I guess he'd know.
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#3
I'm going to have to agree with him, based off the article.  He didn't say "it's better to be an atheist."  He asked how many times others have said, "Better to be an atheist than" a hypocritical Catholic.  To be honest, he's got a point; how many people have been driven away from the Church because of what they perceive as hypocrisy or double standard?  I know that's what drove me away for a bit. 
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#4
Other articles say the Pope "suggests" it's better to be an atheist, so I don't know. Obviously scandal and hypocrisy are ugly and do drive some people away, but hopefully the Pope wasn't actually saying atheism is somehow "better."
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#5
He's wrong on all counts either way.

1. If someone doesn't believe in God, but still goes to Church every Sunday, there's a much greater chance that they may have a conversion moment.

2. If someone is a Catholic and believes in God, but habitually sins then you either have a situation where 1) the person wants to stop and they will continue to try to do so until they do, or 2) where a person doesn't care, but there is still hope that them being a Catholic will eventually convert their hearts to try to stop.

Either way, being an atheist is not the better solution. One thing is that we shouldn't have Catholics who aren't trying their best to live up to Church teachings who are priests, religious, or even lay people who hold high positions within local churches/diocese.
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#6
Agreed, GangGreen.
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#7
This whole authoritarian bullying schtick is getting tiresome as well as the conflicting messages.

What precisely is considered a double life?  Not supporting global warming? Getting remarried without an annulment? Asking for clarification for confusing papal encyclicals?

and another thing.... where is the mercy for those Catholics that are "leading a double life" so to speak.

Enough Pope Francis enough enough enough enough  :realmad: :realmad:
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#8
Two Peter (Dear Leader Version) 2:21:

"For it had been better for them not to have known the way of justice, than after they have known it, to turn back from that holy commandment which was delivered to them. "

Not performing social justice as leading a double life is a crock, but otherwise, the Pope is right.  It will be worse for a Catholic that did not live the life fully than it will be for sincere atheists.
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#9
(02-23-2017, 12:31 PM)Melkite Wrote: Two Peter (Dear Leader Version) 2:21:

"For it had been better for them not to have known the way of justice, than after they have known it, to turn back from that holy commandment which was delivered to them. "

Not performing social justice as leading a double life is a crock, but otherwise, the Pope is right.  It will be worse for a Catholic that did not live the life fully than it will be for sincere atheists.

The same can be said here:
"And to every one to whom much has been given, much shall be required from him; and to whom [men] have committed much, they will ask from him the more." (Luke 12:48)

Of course this is true. However, whether someone denounces God and lives as an atheist or someone at least lives out being Catholic through the motions, the outcome is the same. This person has learned about Catholicism and then rejects it whether they are a "fake" Catholic or declare themselves and atheist, it doesn't change what Peter is saying. The difference is that if someone is going to Mass (hopefully Latin Mass) each week, maybe praying with their family, and maybe volunteering through the church or whatever else, this person has a much greater chance of being converted and desiring to stop their sinful ways vs. someone who completely stops being Catholic (even in this sense) and goes into full atheism.
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#10
"not living a double life"
You mean like the divorced and "remarried" in AL and all of the Pope's subsequent support of that?
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