Does this Church artwork seem odd to anyone else and well not very Catholic
#1
[Image: 6t0pa49x4g28wtlg6lzv93rpyql.jpg]

This was put into my local Catholic church and has always struck me as odd and out of place. It always gets long looks from people visiting and I haven't really found a Christian or Catholic equivalent to the image. It doesn't seem Catholic, it looks like a pagan goddess. It is directly opposite of the altar above the doors leading out.

Here are other images from the church built in 1986.
[Image: gi0pvg287uqpe43rvze0qwbb9hl.jpg]
Baptismal font in the narthex/lobby/foyer
[Image: xi7c3zcsl6bwzohg1qmm3t9ubfl.jpg]
The altar it usually has a cloth that covers the front. The ambry (recessed tabernacle) is behind the wood slats.
[Image: l3sqnot3aaw2lf6siogqbtdunvl.jpg]
and an image more traditional Virgin Mary above the side doors near the altar to the direct left of the above picture
[Image: f92rh70593f5mtj3ey021bn9b6l.JPG]

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#2
I agree that the picture at the top of your post seems odd. It looks more New Age than Catholic. The picture at the bottom is very pretty, though. :)
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#3
It is a little "new church" but it is the Assumption I believe.  There's nothing that weird about it, it's just not classically styled. Also, it's just not done very well unfortunately.  There could be a million reasons for that.
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#4
(03-01-2017, 11:38 AM)AugustineNYC Wrote:   There could be a million reasons for that.

Agreed
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#5
(03-01-2017, 11:38 AM)AugustineNYC Wrote: It is a little "new church" but it is the Assumption I believe.  There's nothing that weird about it, it's just not classically styled. Also, it's just not done very well unfortunately.  There could be a million reasons for that.

It is most likely the assumption now that you mention it but in the church there is no context for it it is in the middle of a white/cream wall.Mary is floating in space there are no clouds etc. around her. It is actually bigger than the crucifix at the altar it must be some 8-10 ft wide. I can't seem to find it on the internet but I have seen a picture like this in my local area depicting some kind of goddess (or a fairy) at one of the kind of "new age" stores you get near the beach.
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#6
I think part of the problem is there are hardly any distinct symbols to convey the image's Christian character. Sure, Our Lady's garments are the proper colors and her head is covered, yet there's nothing else that indicates what any of it really means. Proper iconography has either symbolism of divine origin or meaning infused through the Church's continual use and appropriation (at least this is how I understand it).

Also, it's not a particularly skillful representation, and I only mention this because it appears the parish can afford better.
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#7
(03-01-2017, 04:08 PM)KateriElizabeth Wrote:
(03-01-2017, 11:38 AM)AugustineNYC Wrote: It is a little "new church" but it is the Assumption I believe.  There's nothing that weird about it, it's just not classically styled. Also, it's just not done very well unfortunately.  There could be a million reasons for that.

It is most likely the assumption now that you mention it but in the church there is no context for it it is in the middle of a white/cream wall.Mary is floating in space there are no clouds etc. around her. It is actually bigger than the crucifix at the altar it must be some 8-10 ft wide. I can't seem to find it on the internet but I have seen a picture like this in my local area depicting some kind of goddess (or a fairy) at one of the kind of "new age" stores you get near the beach.

Is there a priest there you would feel comfortable talking to about it?  When ever I see things like that I've learned to ask them directly. I learned my lesson in Sarasota Fl. There were these twelve spoked wheels on the side of the altar and I never got a chance to ask them about it.  Although using my own advice I can always call or email them I suppose.
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#8
(03-01-2017, 05:32 PM)NemoClericus Wrote: I think part of the problem is there are hardly any distinct symbols to convey the image's Christian character. Sure, Our Lady's garments are the proper colors and her head is covered, yet there's nothing else that indicates what any of it really means. Proper iconography has either symbolism of divine origin or meaning infused through the Church's continual use and appropriation (at least this is how I understand it).

Also, it's not a particularly skillful representation, and I only mention this because it appears the parish can afford better.

I don't believe they did pay for it to my knowledge a parishioner did it though I'm not sure. It's nice that you think we can afford better unfortunately the people who actually run the church don't go to the church on a regular basis or they go to the sister parish which is better maintained as it is in a main town.


(03-01-2017, 11:38 AM)AugustineNYC Wrote: Is there a priest there you would feel comfortable talking to about it?  When ever I see things like that I've learned to ask them directly. I learned my lesson in Sarasota Fl. There were these twelve spoked wheels on the side of the altar and I never got a chance to ask them about it.  Although using my own advice I can always call or email them I suppose.

We have a new priest he's been there a year but the lay people pretty much run the church and none of them have a strait answer on anything, most of the ones in the positions of authority have been there for less than a year as many of the older ones have died or retired recently. Did you ever find out what the wheels were? I hope it wasn't a dharma wheel (Buddhist wheel.)
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#9

I don't see anything wrong with the painting at all in terms of theology and Mariology and what not. It's perfectly in line with other depictions of the Assumption. It's not to my taste, though (which, of course, doesn't make it "wrong").

Don't fall into the trap of thinking that anything modern is "modernist." When trads of the more "toxic variety" ran rampant around here, that sort of attitude came with them. (The word "modernist" is sooooo abused in certain trad circles. It's such an annoyance and makes us look petty and silly. To people like that, watching TV is "modernist" because Catholics didn't watch TV 100 years ago -- you get the idea. They come off as Luddites -- and as people who don't have a clue what "Modernist" means.).

And don't fall into the other trap of trying to find things that are wrong, KWIM? That's a not uncommon thing that some trads do, especially ones who've just discovered Tradition. They're (rightfully!) angry about all the horrible changes that've taken place in the human element of the Church that they focus too much on it and become almost happy to find things to get ticked off about. They become emotionally addicted to moral outrage. A good rule of thumb: if you're focused more on all the things that are going wrong in the human element of the Church (and things are most definitely going way, way wrong!) than you are on growing in holiness, loving God, and loving and serving others, then you're doing Tradition wrong.

Please know that I am very much NOT accusing you of doing either (!!!), but I sense you're new to Tradition, so am just offering some thoughts, some things I've learned over the 20 years I've been doing what I do -- and, too, I tend to post here with the idea in mind that hundreds of other people aside from the person I'm responding to are reading. So what I wrote above is so very much NOT to be taken personally! :)
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#10
I don't really find much wrong with them. My only qualms are that the first one does look slightly New Agey and that it doesn't really look like how Mary is typically depicted. I also am not a big fan of the modernish church, its nice for what its been given but it just looks very protestant in my opinion and I come from a protestant background.

I do think the statue and the picture of Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal are both quite beautiful, bit of a different style but not at all bad and certainly not un-Catholic. I also really like the depiction of the pelican on the Altar, very Eucharistic.
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