Annivesary of Pope Francis
#11
(03-14-2017, 01:28 AM)Vox Clamantis Wrote:
(03-14-2017, 12:24 AM)Credidi Propter Wrote: This never impressed me one bit.  When I became Catholic, it seemed all my diocese cared about was "the poor."  They used to dump so much money into social justice programs, but had trouble finding the resources to adequately maintain their evangelization and vocation programs.  Mother Teresa once said "We think sometimes that poverty is only being hungry, naked and homeless. The poverty of being unwanted, unloved and uncared for is the greatest poverty."  We have plenty of NGO's who help care for the body, but the Church alone can care for the soul.  It does little good to care for the body but ignore the soul of one who wants to die.  Catholic social teaching is important, but only for the sake of saving souls.  From the very beginning, whether or not my impression was accurate, Pope Francis' version of Catholicism reminded me of the false materialistic religion that was forced upon me in place of authentic Catholicism for the first few years that I was Catholic- that false religion that was cleansed from the diocese by the bishop Pope Francis sacked.

While I disagree that Catholic social teaching is important only for the sake of saving souls ( and we have to remember that the body and soul are one), I say "heck yeah" to your overall point. The hyper-focus on the temporal world is sacrilege, in the end.

And I've wondered, too, about the almost deification of "the poor." Heck, I'm poor by American standards (though I fully recognize that by the standards of, say, some parts of Africa, I'm fantastically wealthy), and living in the Near east side of Indianapolis, I can assure you that "the poor" tend not to be saintly.  Seems to me that when many Catholics think of "the poor," they have in mind some pious little ethnic family, in which the old man fishes for a living, and the woman tats to supplement his in come so they can feed their 10 children, half of whom are headed for seminaries or convents. In real life, it ain't like dat. Visit a ghetto Kroger and look around. Check out that area's crime rates. Talk to the people.

And as to poverty in general, if Catholic social teaching were followed, much of it could be alleviated. What's typically done now to help the poor (and I , of course, agree that we need to help them) so typically makes the problems worse. Consider how welfare inevitably subsidizes single women who choose to have babies -- who grow up to rely on that same sort of welfare. Or check out the article below, about how Western aid to Africa is keeping the place broke:

For God's Sake, Please Stop the Aid!

What's needed are the establishment of sane property laws; Courts to protect property and punish fraud; free markets minus usury, fiat currencies, etc.;  the eradication of corruption in places like Mexico, or like Africa with their "Big Men" who hoard all the resources; the spread of the Gospel and Western science; and stopping governments from subsidizing what they shouldn't want more of (fatherless homes, etc.). The standard "social justice" solutions exacerbate the problems.

Perhaps it would be more accurate to say that Catholic Social Teaching is important "ultimately" for the salvation of souls, rather than "only."
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#12
These reductions in punishment for sex-abuser priests are extremely depressing. The only 'mercy' these 'priests' deserve is not getting the tar beaten out of them, if not worse.
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#13
(03-14-2017, 04:14 PM)Estevao Wrote: These reductions in punishment for sex-abuser priests are extremely depressing. The only 'mercy' these 'priests' deserve is not getting the tar beaten out of them, if not worse.

This only proves further that Pope Francis' treatment of my former bishop was for some other reason than what the secular media gave.  One day, Francis will have to render an account for his unjust treatment of faithful Catholics.
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#14
Pope Francis is obviously a subversive, and there is a pressing need for the ecclesiastical hierarchy to act immediately. Divine law provides a valid process to deal with papal heresy, and the clergy must finally initiate it. The hour is yet late, and souls are being lost.

The so-called "PedoGate" is threatening to uproot the power of the secret sects internationally, and thus also within the Vatican State. We need a different Pope of Rome to destroy heresy, but also to eradicate international pedosatanism. The polarisation brought about by the present Pontiff opens a door for the election of a counter-revolutionary Pope in the next conclave. In extra-ordinary circumstances, extra-ordinary choices are sometimes made during conclaves, and it is not at all impossible that, when the Throne of Peter is vacated, a monk, for example, from some order that follows traditional liturgical and monastic discipline would be elected (Saint Peter Celestine was not a cardinal when he was elected, neither was Saint Fabian - it is entirely legitimate to elect a Pope outside of the College of Cardinals). Such a future election could be the fruit of the exasperation of the cardinals, and more importantly, the result of an inspiration by the Holy Ghost.

Recall that the Catholic Church is governed by Our Lord Jesus Christ, and that she is His Mystical Body on earth which cannot be destroyed by heresy and corruption. Recall also that 2017 is the centennial year of the Marian Apparitions in Fatima. Christians must pray incessantly and urge the Princes of the Church to act, for the time to act is now.
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#15
(03-15-2017, 04:27 PM)Exilenomore Wrote: Pope Francis is obviously a subversive, and there is a pressing need for the ecclesiastical hierarchy to act immediately. Divine law provides a valid process to deal with papal heresy, and the clergy must finally initiate it. The hour is yet late, and souls are being lost.

The so-called "PedoGate" is threatening to uproot the power of the secret sects internationally, and thus also within the Vatican State. We need a different Pope of Rome to destroy heresy, but also to eradicate international pedosatanism. The polarisation brought about by the present Pontiff opens a door for the election of a counter-revolutionary Pope in the next conclave. In extra-ordinary circumstances, extra-ordinary choices are sometimes made during conclaves, and it is not at all impossible that, when the Throne of Peter is vacated, a monk, for example, from some order that follows traditional liturgical and monastic discipline would be elected (Saint Peter Celestine was not a cardinal when he was elected, neither was Saint Fabian - it is entirely legitimate to elect a Pope outside of the College of Cardinals). Such a future election could be the fruit of the exasperation of the cardinals, and more importantly, the result of an inspiration by the Holy Ghost.

Recall that the Catholic Church is governed by Our Lord Jesus Christ, and that she is His Mystical Body on earth which cannot be destroyed by heresy and corruption. Recall also that 2017 is the centennial year of the Marian Apparitions in Fatima. Christians must pray incessantly and urge the Princes of the Church to act, for the time to act is now.

I think the only way the Cardinals will elect a genuinely traditional pope is if the world is thrown into absolute turmoil from top to bottom. A conclave that takes place within the present comfort of the Vatican will never do anything as drastic as electing a genuine traditionalist. In my opinion only a conclave that is meeting in secret while under the threat of death would dare to do such a thing. I do think after Francis dies or resigns the next pope will be relatively conservative, but I'm thinking more along the lines of say, Cardinal Erdo instead of Bishop Schneider.
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