Are racist or generally bad jokes mortal sin?
#11
(04-05-2017, 10:36 AM)GangGreen Wrote: It's funny because in the old days people used racial jokes all the time and no one cared. These days people are so sensitive. Most racial jokes are made out of fun, some out of malice. I'm sure the crusaders made tons of Muslim jokes, I doubt God was upset that those dirty Saracens were made fun of.

In the old days I think that people didn't realize the effect of what they said to and about other people. That is one of the reasons we pray for the souls in purgatory.
Reply
#12
Matt. 12:36-37?
Reply
#13
Slavoj Žižek, a pretentious but entertaining Marxist blowhard, sees ethnic jokes as creating "friendly obscenities" that allow for more closeness between people who are different, leading to possibilities of closeness and honest exchange. He says that political correctness is more artificial and more stifling, since it doesn't lead to any kind of real engagement, but just insists on self-discipline, on stifling and controlling the racism it assumes exists as a constant and immutable part of life.



Why not ask a black man if he knows any good jokes about white people?
Reply
#14
(04-06-2017, 01:34 PM)Cyriacus Wrote: Why not ask a black man if he knows any good jokes about white people?

I would certainly be interested to know what he'd come up with.
Reply
#15
If a racist joke expresses hatred of intent on the part of the joker, then it is a mortal sin, because hatred of another and hatred of particular groups of people based on their identity are mortal sins.

If a racist or "bad" joke scandalizes, and the speaker is aware of the likelihood of scandal or offense among the hearers, it is at least a venial sin, for that would show lack of charity.

In general, knowingly giving offense violates charity.  If the speaker and listeners are merely poking fun at the existence of stereotypes, and understand the joke to be more about that than serious derision of an entire group of people, then there may be no sin involved, but only as long as the intent of the speaker and the message are clear in that way.
Reply
#16
How did the sheep jokes end up with ISIS? They're typically told about New Zealanders (and also the Welsh, in the UK)
Reply
#17
(04-09-2017, 07:19 AM)MichaelNZ Wrote: How did the sheep jokes end up with ISIS? They're typically told about New Zealanders (and also the Welsh, in the UK)

I'm not entirely sure, although there's a lot of rumors of Iraqi and Afghani men being caught in the throes of interspecies erotica.

On that note:

[Image: nzphonesex.jpg]

Q: What did the Brits call sheep they brought home from the Falklands?
A: War brides.
Reply
#18
(04-06-2017, 12:04 AM)Poche Wrote:
(04-05-2017, 10:36 AM)GangGreen Wrote: It's funny because in the old days people used racial jokes all the time and no one cared. These days people are so sensitive. Most racial jokes are made out of fun, some out of malice. I'm sure the crusaders made tons of Muslim jokes, I doubt God was upset that those dirty Saracens were made fun of.

In the old days I think that people didn't realize the effect of what they said to and about other people. That is one of the reasons we pray for the souls in purgatory.

I think there's a difference between malice and joke. The now late Don Rickles (interesting how he died only a day after I posted that video) even says in that video, if you're not laughing back it's not funny. He obviously knew that if he was making a joke about someone's race, nationality, religion, or whatever if they didn't laugh it was no longer a joke. It's certainly a fine line to walk. Today it's part that people look for any reason to be offended instead of laughing at themselves. In a way, it's really an issue of pride. We don't want to hear these things about ourselves even if they're not true. It requires a certain amount of humility to laugh at yourself.

I guess in general one should avoid making jokes about someone who isn't there to determine whether such a joke is demeaning to them and of course often times these things turn into gossip, rumors, lies, immodesty, and the like. In any sense, I can't imagine mocking the sworn enemies of our God could be sinful, but maybe I'm wrong.
Reply
#19
Sorry to bump this one, but here's a song with malice against an evil person and I find it hilarious. Is it really sinful to laugh at this?

Warning: Same bad language.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)