Divine Mercy devotion and Divine Mercy Sunday
#1
Do most trads have a devotion to the Divine Mercy? I know that Vox has a page on it in the 'Being Catholic' section of the website, but as a whole do trads generally pray the chaplet or observe the Hour of Divine Mercy? I have a reminder for the Hour of Divine Mercy set on my phone every day for 3pm, and I do pray the chaplet sometimes (I really should pray it more).

What about Divine Mercy Sunday? Can this be incorporated into the Tridentine Mass in any way? If it can't, do any trad parishes commemorate the Divine Mercy in some other way on that Sunday, such as in the sermon?
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#2
I've encountered one traditional priest who opposes the Divine Mercy devotion. But he was not a great example, as he was a bit unhinged in some other ways as well. Overall, I haven't heard much about it either way, except the occasional traditional priest who mentions it on Low/ Divine Mercy Sunday, just in passing to point out that that is one devotion that exists and is connected to the day.

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#3
(04-09-2017, 11:35 PM)MichaelNZ Wrote: Do most trads have a devotion to the Divine Mercy? I know that Vox has a page on it in the 'Being Catholic' section of the website, but as a whole do trads generally pray the chaplet or observe the Hour of Divine Mercy? I have a reminder for the Hour of Divine Mercy set on my phone every day for 3pm, and I do pray the chaplet sometimes (I really should pray it more).

What about Divine Mercy Sunday? Can this be incorporated into the Tridentine Mass in any way? If it can't, do any trad parishes commemorate the Divine Mercy in some other way on that Sunday, such as in the sermon?

I will have nothing to do with the devotion. I have heard from more than one promoter of it that it was meant to "replace" the Sacred Heart devotion and I don't like that. More importantly, however, it claims that God's greatest attribute is mercy. According to the Baltimore Catechism, God is "a spirit, infinitely perfect."  Infinite perfection can have no "greatest attribute, because all attributes are infinitely perfect. Making that claim that God's greatest attribute is mercy may sound nice when you've messed up and are ashamed of yourself, but it is not good theology. Also, it is strange that a new devotion appeared all of a sudden just as some in the Church were rewriting the liturgy, and when Ressourcement theology was becoming more widely accepted.

I plan to take particular care to go to the Tridentine Mass on Low Sunday precisely because I don't want to hear the priest preach about Divine Mercy Sunday.
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#4
There are many trads who question the DM devotion. The prayers in and of themselves aren't necessarily bad, but there are lots of questions that arise from the intent of the devotion, the fact that the diary was on the Index for many years, there are some questionable passages in that diary, it seems to replace the Sacred Heart, the original image didn't even include the Sacred Heart, among other things. For those reasons I tend to shy away from it. One can be devoted to God's mercy in many other ways... especially in the Sacred Heart which is more time honored and also stresses repentance/penance.  The Divine Mercy devotion seems to give this idea that God will be merciful to an extreme where one doesn't even necessarily need to repent and do penance. It can definitely create a dangerous attitude. We've seen even from the top the mercy mania and how everything is mercy mercy mercy without need to repent.
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#5
Thanks for the replies.

I had no idea St Faustina's diary was on the Index for many years. What do some of the questionable passages say?

I'm not so sure about the devotion anymore, but I don't see anything wrong with pausing at 3pm to remember Our Lord's passing. I did like the idea of God granting everything that one asks for during the Hour of Divine Mercy, though.
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#6
Tradition in Action probably gives the most comprehensive write up that I've seen
http://www.traditioninaction.org/HotTopi...vMercy.htm

There are probably other sites out there, but that's the first that came up in a Google search.

Also, pausing at 3pm is a fine devotion... one that I'm sure existed long before DM.
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#7
The highest authorities in the church have seen fit to make the devotion into something huge. That alone should put devout obedient Catholics at ease about it.  So what if it was once on the Index, even the Sacred Heart devotion  at one time was considered suspect. Either way no one is forced to say the Chaplet or have any particular devotion to it. 

I guess I've never thought much of it either way. There's certainly nothing objectionable about the content of the Chaplet,or wanting God to have mercy on people. I think some trads don't like it simply because it's new and was promoted by John Paul II.

I wouldn't worry about it so much.  If you want to be devoted to it than go for it,if not than don't. 
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#8
By their fruits you shall know them.

DM can be beneficial to some, of course, but it's also open to abuse. The Novus Ordo can be beneficial to many Catholics but is also easily abused. Just because people can obtain some good from something doesn't necessarily mean that it should be promoted above others. God can allow good to come even from imperfect things and yes, I believe that the NO is imperfect even if valid. If any Catholic would ask me to choose between SH and DM I would, without hesitation, tell them to choose SH.  If any Catholic would ask me to choose between TLM or NO, I'd choose TLM without hesitation. If I examine the overall impact of the DM and NO I can tell that the overall fruits of them especially when combined with the overall atmosphere of the Church has not been a net positive. As said, the DM allows people to presume upon mercy without repentance and penance, this is a horrible thing. If being devoted to DM requires one to be well formed enough to have a good understanding of sin and having repentance/penance being a large part of their life before using it, then it should be rejected IMO.
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#9
Personally, I pray the Divine Mercy Chaplet most every day. I have come to love this devotion because of an incident, witnessed by my children and me around the deathbed of my dear wife whilst we prayed this chaplet and what occurred at it's conclusion. It was very impressive for all present.

I will certainly be starting the yearly devotion on Good Friday and I have no qualms about all the 'naysayers' out there, because they always are 'out there'.

As to St. Faustina's diary, well, if you read it in English, you are reading a translation, so I'd tend to doubt more the accuracy of the translation than the account provided by the original Polish. Doubts come and go and this sort doubting does as most doubting does: It is a dissolution of Faith, the exact opposite of Faith and I believe, in my humble opinion (and a very large number like me) that it is a true devotion and as such, it cannot take away anything from any other devotion and to think so is erroneous and wrong and does a disservice to all devotions, since many do intermingle and seemingly transpose one another.

In the end, they only enhance each other and never eclipse another. That kind of inclination is a man-made one.
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#10
Most traditionalists avoid it, if not necessarily condemn it.

That TIA article is pretty thought provoking. Here is a link to a pdf on more as to why it was condemned. (Not an endorsement, just a reference)

http://novusordowatch.org/2013/10/divine...condemned/

If one has gotten graces from it, then that is wonderful. I personally am skeptical of it, however, as of all things previously condemned but now approved by Universalists. Although it is probably more innocuous than false ecumenisim.

God could very well just be giving merciful graces to a good willed soul, and not necessarily because of the specific devotion.
I do lament the falling off of the Sacred Heart devotion which seems to have been largely replaced by it, at least in the Novus Ordo.

Whatever one does, please do not perpetuate the below, which is probably the most sentimental and sappy Protestant Novus Ordo thing I have seen on EWTN.

https://m.youtube.com/#/watch?v=oUtqwdaSzx0
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