Toilet bidets
#1
Lately I've been looking to having a bidet installed in our toilet - not the kind that require a lot of space, separate from the toilet itself; but rather the kind that simply fit right into the toilet bowl.

I want to install a bidet because (1) they save money on toilet paper; (2) they can help us to be better stewards of nature (less paper = less treecutting, etc); (3) less risk of clogging; (4) probably very luxurious and comfortable bathroom experience.

What do all of you think?
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#2
I'm not sure what to think. It would cut down on tp use, but I'm not sure what the increase in water consumption would be, both financially and ecologically. More water use = more pressure on watersheds.

Regarding the risk of clogging, veggies and the occasional courtesy flush go a long way.

Also, regarding a separate bidet, the benefit is that if you have a visitor you really don't like, tell him it's a midget water fountain. Funny story behind that...
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#3
(04-22-2017, 09:33 PM)Jeeter Wrote: I'm not sure what to think. It would cut down on tp use, but I'm not sure what the increase in water consumption would be, both financially and ecologically. More water use = more pressure on watersheds.

Regarding the risk of clogging, veggies and the occasional courtesy flush go a long way.

Also, regarding a separate bidet, the benefit is that if you have a visitor you really don't like, tell him it's a midget water fountain. Funny story behind that...

Well, I suspect the water consumption of a bidet is negligible. Unless it's being run all day, like a fountain!  :LOL:

I think, for the environment, it is better to use a tiny bit extra water rather than a great amount of toilet paper.
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#4
The majority of TP is made from renewable sources as in recycled paper. It all comes from wood and there is a whole lot of wood over the world 'going to waste' if you look at it that way. It is also very biodegradable, so a septic system breaks it down quite readily. Now paper towels are another matter and never should be flushed; they are meant not to easily break down.

But I digress.

I will continue to use TP. Splashing my derriere with cold water is not a very pleasant thing to expect every morning. The prospect of a cold water 'goose' doesn't appeal to me and if everyone is opting for low water use toilets these days, why negate this benefit by getting the 'goose'? Another thing, one need really splash for extended time to completely clean a surface, while a good swipe is more effective.






Just a little associated levity:

How is the Starship Enterprise, like toilet paper?

Both their missions are to sweep around Uranus and wipe out the Klingons!

:grin:
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#5

I'd be grossed out having anything spraying on me when the source of the spray is inside a toilet bowl. Splatter of various sorts would get on the nozzle -- and whatever's on that nozzle would end up on you. And without that water being hot water, it would be awful anyway. My opinion: get a real bidet. 
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#6
The other earth friendly option is to eat with the right and wipe with the left.

Or was it the other way around?  Uh, oh...
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#7
Oh, but I wouldn't want cold water! I had in mind a warm water bidet - cold water would be very unpleasant!

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#8
(04-24-2017, 04:23 PM)Mark Williams Wrote: Oh, but I wouldn't want cold water! I had in mind a warm water bidet - cold water would be very unpleasant!

You could use your warm bidet during the year and turn it to cold during Lent.
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#9
(04-24-2017, 04:28 PM)Etimasia Wrote:
(04-24-2017, 04:23 PM)Mark Williams Wrote: Oh, but I wouldn't want cold water! I had in mind a warm water bidet - cold water would be very unpleasant!

You could use your warm bidet during the year and turn it to cold during Lent.

Excellent idea.

Small daily penances go a long way.
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#10
(04-24-2017, 10:36 AM)Zedta Wrote: The majority of TP is made from renewable sources as in recycled paper. It all comes from wood and there is a whole lot of wood over the world 'going to waste' if you look at it that way.
(04-22-2017, 09:33 PM)Jeeter Wrote: I'm not sure what to think. It would cut down on tp use, but I'm not sure what the increase in water consumption would be, both financially and ecologically. More water use = more pressure on watersheds.

Ah, but you forget all the water that goes into producing that paper, whether recycled or virgin paper.

It's like the cloth diaper debate - people will argue that cloth diapers are less "environmentally friendly" because they consume water, but that's only because you can see the water. Diapers are made from wood pulp and plastic- two of the most water-polluting and water-intensive industries in the world.  But it's hidden - we can't actually see it, so it doesn't enter into our consciousness. The cloth option actually produces less waste in the long run, and potentially uses less water and energy if you do it right, especially if you get multiple kiddos out of a single set (and depending on your fabric choice). It's been estimated that using cloth diapers uses roughly the same amount of water as having that same child potty trained would use i.e. roughly the same amount of water that would be used for flushing.

The bidet argument, I imagine, would be similar. Yeah, it seems like a lot of water because we can see it, but if you consider the amount of water that goes into production (and shipping - more of that pesky oil!), it's probably at least a zero-sum game, and I would theorize that a bidet would use less in the long run. Also, you have to keep in mind that toilet paper is a final-end product for paper - you're not going to be recycling that anymore! Whereas if it was recycled into other forms of paper, it could potentially enter the production stream again. 

Additionally, you need a method of dealing with the increased biomass due to the wood pulp that comes with waste-water management. The bio-mass issue is almost always the larger issue than watershed, because often the water is returned to the same watershed downstream. Where I live, the water that comes out of my tap returns to the same river from whence is came, further downstream naturally. So the watershed issue is relatively negligible vs. disposing of tonnes of bio-mass. A couple of years ago Winnipeg was struggling to find ways to use their bio-mass without resorting to spreading it on fields as fertilizer. There was a tender put out looking for proposals. I don't think they go any! So most of the biomass ends up in landfill, toilet paper and all.
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