Toilet bidets
#11
I've been using a toilet bidet for years. It's one of the best investments that I ever made. They're super easy to install, btw. The only tricky part is if you get one that has a hot water connection... if you don't have the connection near your toilet, you'll have to drill a hole into your vanity and hook it up with the hot water from the sink. I've actually never hooked up the warm water on mine. I have no issue with the cold water. In the winter it can get a little colder than the warmer months, but it's hardly an issue unless you have really cold water running through your pipes.

I have this one: http://a.co/8TP4H4M

The first one I ever bought was this one: http://a.co/9SqkHLU. There's a pretty decent difference between the cheaper ones and the ones that are a bit better.

When I was on my honeymoon in Hawaii, the hotel that we were staying at had a really high tech one. It had a heated seat, a whole control panel, and some other gadgets.  Was something more like this:
http://a.co/ggSKcxR. Some of these things go up to like $1,000!  :LOL:

Also, a bidet is cleaner. If you had poop on your arm you wouldn't wipe it off with paper.
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#12
(04-25-2017, 02:47 AM)PrairieMom Wrote:
(04-24-2017, 10:36 AM)Zedta Wrote: The majority of TP is made from renewable sources as in recycled paper. It all comes from wood and there is a whole lot of wood over the world 'going to waste' if you look at it that way.
(04-22-2017, 09:33 PM)Jeeter Wrote: I'm not sure what to think. It would cut down on tp use, but I'm not sure what the increase in water consumption would be, both financially and ecologically. More water use = more pressure on watersheds.

Ah, but you forget all the water that goes into producing that paper, whether recycled or virgin paper.

It's like the cloth diaper debate - people will argue that cloth diapers are less "environmentally friendly" because they consume water, but that's only because you can see the water. Diapers are made from wood pulp and plastic- two of the most water-polluting and water-intensive industries in the world.  But it's hidden - we can't actually see it, so it doesn't enter into our consciousness. The cloth option actually produces less waste in the long run, and potentially uses less water and energy if you do it right, especially if you get multiple kiddos out of a single set (and depending on your fabric choice). It's been estimated that using cloth diapers uses roughly the same amount of water as having that same child potty trained would use i.e. roughly the same amount of water that would be used for flushing.

The bidet argument, I imagine, would be similar. Yeah, it seems like a lot of water because we can see it, but if you consider the amount of water that goes into production (and shipping - more of that pesky oil!), it's probably at least a zero-sum game, and I would theorize that a bidet would use less in the long run. Also, you have to keep in mind that toilet paper is a final-end product for paper - you're not going to be recycling that anymore! Whereas if it was recycled into other forms of paper, it could potentially enter the production stream again. 

Additionally, you need a method of dealing with the increased biomass due to the wood pulp that comes with waste-water management. The bio-mass issue is almost always the larger issue than watershed, because often the water is returned to the same watershed downstream. Where I live, the water that comes out of my tap returns to the same river from whence is came, further downstream naturally. So the watershed issue is relatively negligible vs. disposing of tonnes of bio-mass. A couple of years ago Winnipeg was struggling to find ways to use their bio-mass without resorting to spreading it on fields as fertilizer. There was a tender put out looking for proposals. I don't think they go any! So most of the biomass ends up in landfill, toilet paper and all.

It takes me like half a roll of paper to clean up, and sometimes that's not even enough. Seems like a bidet would be quite helpful and save on paper.
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#13
Not to be gross but I've always had "difficulty" with toilet paper. A bidet would solve a lot of problems
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#14
This is a topic I never thought I'd see on FE :LOL:

My husband and I both have been interested in trying out a bidet. Toilet paper really leaves you dirtier than most people realize. I tend to use wet wipes a lot because I feel gross not being totally clean, so if we're talking environmental friendliness, a bidet might be worth it. My only question/concern is whether the flow of water actually increases the incidence of UTI in women vs wiping front to back.
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#15
We have one. I like it.
"Not only are we all in the same boat, but we are all seasick.” --G.K. Chesterton
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#16
(03-10-2018, 05:47 PM)Catherine Wrote: This is a topic I never thought I'd see on FE :LOL:

My husband and I both have been interested in trying out a bidet. Toilet paper really leaves you dirtier than most people realize. I tend to use wet wipes a lot because I feel gross not being totally clean, so if we're talking environmental friendliness, a bidet might be worth it. My only question/concern is whether the flow of water actually increases the incidence of UTI in women vs wiping front to back.

Not sure. My wife uses it occasionally and doesn't have problems. I think you'll just need to angle it right so that you get less splatter in that direction. Otherwise, maybe use since toilet paper as a shield? IDK.

It's really a wonderful thing though. Definitely give it a shot. Even a lower end model gets the job done, although you have to be a bit careful with the lower end ones since sometimes the initial blast of water can be a bit too powerful.

My brother says his wife won't use it unless the water is heated, so that's another consideration. With the hot water ones you can run the line through the vanity and then split off from the sink's hot water line (apparently I already said all of this in a prior post)
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#17
Ummm... yeah, listen sweeties... this thread topic is sinful and you've all been reported  :idea:
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#18
(03-11-2018, 01:58 AM)Imperator Caesar Trump Wrote: Ummm... yeah, listen sweeties... this thread topic is sinful and you've all been reported  :idea:

Ummm... no.

Last time I checked, being clean is not sinful.
Surréxit Dóminus vere, Alleluia!
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#19
(04-24-2017, 10:47 AM)VoxClamantis Wrote: I'd be grossed out having anything spraying on me when the source of the spray is inside a toilet bowl. Splatter of various sorts would get on the nozzle -- and whatever's on that nozzle would end up on you. And without that water being hot water, it would be awful anyway. My opinion: get a real bidet. 


I am all for clean potties, but as I am told, pee is sterile. My friend Bigwheel says 'American Indians used it for antiseptic. Bluing gun barrels..tanning buffalo hides and curing athletes feet. Also good for ear infections.'  Poop not so much, but you can see if that's on the sprayer.
"Not only are we all in the same boat, but we are all seasick.” --G.K. Chesterton
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