Looking for help Homeschooling Grammar
#1
Hey, all -

I was hoping to get some help in regards to teaching/reteaching myself and my wife grammar. We went to public school full time, public university, and now are catholic and planning to homeschool.

We realize that we are thoroughly outgunned in language (among other subjects) and would like to get boned up before we begin homeschooling our oldest in two years. Really, it all comes down to which curriculum to use as we should be able to run through and get familiar with that ourselves ahead of the kiddies.

We have a good idea of what curriculum and such we will use with the one exception of English/Grammar. Any thoughts?

+JMJ+
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  • ServusDei
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#2
I like the gradual nature of Emma Searl's Primary Language Lessons and Intermediate Language Lessons.  There's dictation, picture study, pieces for memorization, conversation exercises, compositions . . .  Every day is a little different so that children never get bored.
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#3
I love the Serl books too. We've only used the first one, but my kids really enjoy it. They especially love the conversation exercises. We use CHC's Language of God (and their spellers) as our "nuts and bolts" curricula, and the Serl books as supplement. We're fairly eclectic, using CHC for many subjects but drawing in other sources too, especially Charlotte Mason-type philosophies and resources.

I never really learned formal grammar in English (I did a little in French, which was the language I was educated in, but I don't remember doing it a lot), but I read. A lot. I still read a lot. In many ways, we learn written language in much the same ways that we learn spoken language - by exposure, repetition and practice.  I couldn't diagram a sentence to save my life, and I suppose I will eventually learn to do it alongside my kids.  I went into this homeschooling thing without doing any prep learning except reading about homeschooling.

That's part of the beauty of homeschooling. Even if you have gaps in your own education, you get to learn alongside your children. You're modeling learning as a life-long process. I have learned and retained far more in a few years of homeschooling than what I ever learned in a bricks-and-mortar school.

Before getting too worried about learning grammatical rules and "doing" the program before your kids, I would strongly suggest you read up on philosophy and learning/teaching methods. Teaching in a Charlotte Mason way would be very different than using a Seton grammar book, for example. Get a good idea about what's out there, and the different approaches. Observe your child and see how they prefer to learn. Figure out how you like to teach. Those things are more important than worrying about grammar.

A good book is Ruth Beechicks's The Three R's. She lays it out really well *how* to teach children reading, writing and math as a process and not necessarily using a set curriculum. I've read (it might be in the Beechick book, it's been awhile) that in the early years, spend less on curricula for your children and more on books for the parents - they will benefit in the long run from parents have a firm footing and direction in what they are hoping to accomplish.

And if you get a chance, go to a homeschooling conference if there's one in your relative vicinity, even if you're not officially homeschooling yet. It nothing else, you'll benefit from having the chance to browse vendors, to physically look through their books. I found that very helpful, even though I could only attend a "Christian" homeschooling conference vs. a Catholic one. I could flip through some books and see how they were laid out, organized, etc.
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#4
Tom Woods is a traditional Catholic and an Ivy League-educated (Harvard, Columbia) historian. You may want to check out his homeschooling program.

https://tomwoodshomeschool.com/
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#5
I used the Shurley English Method when I was in grade school. The concept is a bit dated, but it worked well for me.  Even now, at quite a bit older than ten, I can close my eyes and picture myself back in fourth grade classifying the parts of speech in a sentence, identifying sentence patterns, and reciting them like multiplication tables.  Some people, including some of my later teachers, scoffed at the notion of such rote learning, but I sure found it helpful, and wring has been a very strong area for me since then.
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#6
Quote:First Language Lessons for the Well-Trained Mind > by Jessie Wise

It begins with the fundamentals, it clarifies ideas and obviously, there's sufficient redundancy to ensure it sticks. Exercises as a rule take under fefteen minutes each to write my essay for me and practice each grammar rule. The parent book is totally scripted so there's no compelling reason to comprehend anything before you start an exercise, you essentially open it and begin perusing so anyone might hear. Truly, I thought scripting sounded terrible and exhausting before we began this, yet now I love it. It makes my activity extraordinarily simple.


I used Grammaropolis and Jensen's Grammar when I homeschooled my granddaughter (reviewed by Cathy Duffy in the section Composition and Grammar for homeschooling). I Laid an Egg on Aunt Ruth's Head is a good read for grammatical distinctions.
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#7
Easy Grammar Workbooks are just like the title says!


Language of God Workbooks are very sweet with a Catholic theme for the early years, but Easy Grammar is more thorough with more repetition exercises in the later years even though they are secular.
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#8
That's wonderful! I've used Seton's English series from Kindergarten, and it's top-notch.

You can buy those at Seton Educational Media: setonbooks.com (English 8 is where I reccomend you start: https://www.setonbooks.com/viewone.php?ToView=P-EN08-21)

They cover all aspects of English, and definitely do not shy away from diagramming. If you like their books, I totally reccomend Seton. It's a wonderful curriculum, and 100000% Catholic.
:monstrance:Deo Gratias et Ave Maria! :monstrance:
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A Dieu mon ame,
Mon arme au roi,
Mon Coeur a la dame,
Mon honneur a moi!
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#9
(04-10-2020, 08:52 PM)ServusDei Wrote: That's wonderful! I've used Seton's English series from Kindergarten, and it's top-notch.

You can buy those at Seton Educational Media: setonbooks.com (English 8 is where I reccomend you start: https://www.setonbooks.com/viewone.php?ToView=P-EN08-21)

They cover all aspects of English, and definitely do not shy away from diagramming. If you like their books, I totally reccomend Seton. It's a wonderful curriculum, and 100000% Catholic.

Thanks for the advice
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