Does the Pope have to be Roman Catholic
#1
Maybe the title is a little ambiguous.  By Roman Catholic I mean a Catholic of the Latin Church.  I ask this because the Pope is also the Patriarch of the West, and Bishop of Rome, so would that require that he have to be a bishop of the Latin Rite?

I was thinking about this, and I know that it seems like a stretch, but that maybe if an Eastern Rite Catholic bishop were appointed to the Petrine office, it might help to bring some of the eastern schismatic churches back.  Again I know it is a stretch, but I just get the feeling that a major reason for the refusal of rejoining the Church is the perceived threat to their liturgical and spiritual customs, as well as their theological understanding of things.  I am probably wrong, but it was just a thought.
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#2
Interesting thought.  I don't see why not, as election the papacy is open to any baptized Catholic male, if I'm understanding the process correctly.

On that note, if a Ukrainian Catholic became pope, would he then become a Roman Rite Catholic automatically by virtue of being the Bishop of Rome?
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#3

                                          No, as of March 2013, the Pope is no longer required to be Catholic.
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#4
(05-11-2017, 10:12 AM)Eric F Wrote:                                           No, as of March 2013, the Pope is no longer required to be Catholic.

Hey man, how am I gonna argue against that  :LOL: :LOL: :LOL:
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#5
(05-11-2017, 10:00 AM)Jeeter Wrote: Interesting thought.  I don't see why not, as election the papacy is open to any baptized Catholic male, if I'm understanding the process correctly.

On that note, if a Ukrainian Catholic became pope, would he then become a Roman Rite Catholic automatically by virtue of being the Bishop of Rome?

I would be interesting if he would just continue in his rite. The Easterners have been much more conservative.  Would more bishops follow him,i.e. follow his ideas about conservatism and traditional liturgy?  I can just imagine almost overnight, everyone and their mother is all about the Byzantine liturgy (and you would not hear a peep or a complaint outta me!), because that is what the pope does, and we have to do everything the pope does and says because he is Christ...deerrrrrrr I mean VICAR of Christ!!!! (a nice papolatry joke for all of our fellow papists.)
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#6
(05-11-2017, 09:30 AM)Justin Alphonsus Wrote: Maybe the title is a little ambiguous.  By Roman Catholic I mean a Catholic of the Latin Church.  I ask this because the Pope is also the Patriarch of the West, and Bishop of Rome, so would that require that he have to be a bishop of the Latin Rite?

I was thinking about this, and I know that it seems like a stretch, but that maybe if an Eastern Rite Catholic bishop were appointed to the Petrine office, it might help to bring some of the eastern schismatic churches back.  Again I know it is a stretch, but I just get the feeling that a major reason for the refusal of rejoining the Church is the perceived threat to their liturgical and spiritual customs, as well as their theological understanding of things.  I am probably wrong, but it was just a thought.


Even should a Ukrainian Catholic become pope I don't think it would matter much in terms if bringing Orthodox into the papal communion. It's about much more than the externals of the liturgy or how conservative or not a given pope is. If anything a Ukrainian Catholic pope would strengthen Eastern Catholics more than anything else.
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#7
(05-11-2017, 11:17 AM)formerbuddhist Wrote:
(05-11-2017, 09:30 AM)Justin Alphonsus Wrote: Maybe the title is a little ambiguous.  By Roman Catholic I mean a Catholic of the Latin Church.  I ask this because the Pope is also the Patriarch of the West, and Bishop of Rome, so would that require that he have to be a bishop of the Latin Rite?

I was thinking about this, and I know that it seems like a stretch, but that maybe if an Eastern Rite Catholic bishop were appointed to the Petrine office, it might help to bring some of the eastern schismatic churches back.  Again I know it is a stretch, but I just get the feeling that a major reason for the refusal of rejoining the Church is the perceived threat to their liturgical and spiritual customs, as well as their theological understanding of things.  I am probably wrong, but it was just a thought.


Even should a Ukrainian Catholic become pope I don't think it would matter much in terms if bringing Orthodox into the papal communion. It's about much more than the externals of the liturgy or how conservative or not a given pope is. If anything a Ukrainian Catholic pope would strengthen Eastern Catholics more than anything else.

I figure as much.  It was just a thought. I know it will require a lot more than just il Papa being Ukrainian, just maybe the development would give pause to some (emphasis on the some) Orthodox. Obviously, it is going to require a lot of God's grace before the whole of Orthodoxy give up their schism, but I suppose they think the same about me.
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#8
I suppose it could happen. But I think it would be fitting for the Bishop of Rome to practice the Roman Rite, no?
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#9
(05-11-2017, 12:57 PM)Florus Wrote: I suppose it could happen. But I think it would be fitting for the Bishop of Rome to practice the Roman Rite, no?

I agree with that
(05-11-2017, 11:36 AM)Justin Alphonsus Wrote:
(05-11-2017, 11:17 AM)formerbuddhist Wrote:
(05-11-2017, 09:30 AM)Justin Alphonsus Wrote: Maybe the title is a little ambiguous.  By Roman Catholic I mean a Catholic of the Latin Church.  I ask this because the Pope is also the Patriarch of the West, and Bishop of Rome, so would that require that he have to be a bishop of the Latin Rite?



I was thinking about this, and I know that it seems like a stretch, but that maybe if an Eastern Rite Catholic bishop were appointed to the Petrine office, it might help to bring some of the eastern schismatic churches back.  Again I know it is a stretch, but I just get the feeling that a major reason for the refusal of rejoining the Church is the perceived threat to their liturgical and spiritual customs, as well as their theological understanding of things.  I am probably wrong, but it was just a thought.


Even should a Ukrainian Catholic become pope I don't think it would matter much in terms if bringing Orthodox into the papal communion. It's about much more than the externals of the liturgy or how conservative or not a given pope is. If anything a Ukrainian Catholic pope would strengthen Eastern Catholics more than anything else.

I figure as much.  It was just a thought. I know it will require a lot more than just il Papa being Ukrainian, just maybe the development would give pause to some (emphasis on the some) Orthodox. Obviously, it is going to require a lot of God's grace before the whole of Orthodoxy give up their schism, but I suppose they think the same about me.

Truth be told this side of eternity I don't see Roman Catholics and Orthodox ever fully uniting. I've studied the issue for years and it's a mess going back over a millennium. There are no silver bullet answers. Certainly the Roman Catholic Church's deconstruction of the externals at the hands of the popes in the last 100 years or so makes it hard to see the point for communion with the Pope, at least from the Orthodox perspective.

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#10
I agree with FB.

I think an Eastern Catholic pope would actually infuriate most Orthodox bishops and monks. There is a lot of animosity toward Eastern Catholicism amongst Orthodox people.

As for the OP, my first thought was that apparently the pope needn't be Catholic or even obviously Christian!
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