Would this be a heretical belief?
#1
That Christ literally bore all the world's sin during the Passion, and therefore every sin would add a particular increment of pain, so that it was a supernaturally painful event? Ie had there only been one sin it would have just being crucified as normal, but because of the many sins and every new sin the crucifixion would have been made infinitely more painful that it naturally would be to be a more perfect Atonement?
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#2
This statement seems to be essentially correct. I wouldn't state it in a such mechanic way (that "every sin would add a particular increment of pain"). But He bore the weight all sins of humanity during his passion. That's why He sweated blood on Gethsemane, in the moment that he started to 'accept the chalice'.
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#3
Like the other poster don't see anything wrong with your statement, here's a pointer to the CCC on the subject

http://www.vatican.va/archive/ccc_css/ar...22a4p2.htm


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#4
(06-20-2017, 10:55 PM)GoodKingWenceslas Wrote: That Christ literally bore all the world's sin during the Passion, and therefore every sin would add a particular increment of pain, so that it was a supernaturally painful event? Ie had there only been one sin it would have just being crucified as normal, but because of the many sins and every new sin the crucifixion would have been made infinitely more painful that it naturally would be to be a more perfect Atonement?

Not heretical, but ambiguous and could lead to heretical or false ideas if not understood well ...

There seems to be a suggestion that sins added physical pain and the sum of all this physical pain made the Passion "supernaturally painful". That seems to confuse the two orders. No amount of the natural added together ever reaches the supernatural. There is a formal, thus infinite gap.

It is the same with one of the highest sensitive animal and then man. Man is a rational being and thus essentially different from a dolphin. No amount of perfection in natural traits could make a non-rational animal into a rational one.

If you start confusing the natural and supernatural it's easy to end in the errors Henri de Lubac (condemned by Pius XII in Humani Generis) who in his Surnaturel blurred this division between the natural and supernatural, which lead to the error that there one can hope in a quasi-universal salvation, an error taught or at least promoted by the likes of de Lubac, Hans Urs von Balthasar and Pope John Paul II.
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#5
(06-21-2017, 04:58 AM)JosefSilouan Wrote: This statement seems to be essentially correct. I wouldn't state it in a such mechanic way (that "every sin would add a particular increment of pain"). But He bore the weight all sins of humanity during his passion. That's why He sweated blood on Gethsemane, in the moment that he started to 'accept the chalice'.
But so then would x sin make the suffering worse? For example would 1 act of adultery undone make the Passion any less bad?
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#6
(06-21-2017, 06:39 PM)GoodKingWenceslas Wrote:
(06-21-2017, 04:58 AM)JosefSilouan Wrote: This statement seems to be essentially correct. I wouldn't state it in a such mechanic way (that "every sin would add a particular increment of pain"). But He bore the weight all sins of humanity during his passion. That's why He sweated blood on Gethsemane, in the moment that he started to 'accept the chalice'.
But so then would x sin make the suffering worse? For example would 1 act of adultery undone make the Passion any less bad?

The following passage from Lorzenzo Scupoli's "Spiritual Combat" might partly answer your question. It makes a plausible connection between our sins and Jesus' spiritual suffering.


Quote:To arouse compassion in your heart for the sufferings of your Savior and God, exclusive of His exterior pains, consider the most acute of His sufferings, His interior anguish. For if you are moved by the first, you will be pierced with grief at the sight of the second. The soul of Christ beheld the Divinity then as clearly as it does now in heaven. It knew how much God deserved to be honored, and as it infinitely loved Him, desired that all creatures should love Him with all the power of their souls. Seeing Him, therefore, so horribly dishonored throughout the world by countless, abominable crimes, it was overwhelmed with grief that the Divine majesty was not loved and served by
all men.

As the greatness of this desire of the soul of Christ that His Father be loved was beyond imagination, it is futile to try to comprehend the depths of His interior sufferings in the agonies of death.
Moreover, as this Divine Savior loved mankind to an ineffable degree, such an ardent and tender love must have caused Him much sorrow for the sins that would tear men from Him.

For He knew that no one could sin mortally without destroying that sanctifying grace which is the bond between Him and the just. And this separation would cause Jesus greater anguish of soul than dislocated limbs caused His body. For the soul, altogether spiritual and immeasurably superior to the body, is much more delicately attuned to pain. But of all the aflictions of our blessed Savior, the most grievous, doubtless, was the sight of the damned, incapable of repentance, who must inevitably be banished from Him for all eternity. 

Know, moreover, that human nature never was, and never will be subject to any affliction that was unknown to Him. He suffered from injuries, reproaches, temptations, pains, loss of goods, voluntary austerities more acutely than those who groan under them. For as this tender Savior had a perfect comprehension of any affliction of mind or body to which we are prone - even to the least pain or headache. He must certainly have been moved with great compassion for us.
"Cor Jesu Rex Et Centrum Omnium Cordium, miserére nobis "

“To pray is to shed blood.” - Silouan the Athonite
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