Giving up Alcohol
#1
Have any of you all ever given up alcohol before that you were somewhat attached to?

How did you feel? Did your life and mood improve?

I enjoy a good wine or beer at times, but have for some time felt that drinking usually leads me to poor sleep, a depressed mood the following day (even in moderation) and other regrettable decisions.  I have stopped drinking for a month or two before and have felt generally healthier, more clear-headed, etc. but it is such a substantial component to social life that it is difficult to swear off completely.

Any encouraging words or wisdom to share?
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#2
I quit for several years when I was afraid that my attachment to drink was getting out of hand. I have since returned to moderate use of alcohol, with no problem, and my doctor's approval.

However, I did not have the sleep and mood problems you mention, but it was causing 'regrettable decisions'. I also found that I had much more disposable income after I quit drinking.

As to the social component, a word of advice. If you switch to something that looks like a drink, no one will notice. I could still go to a pub or a party and drink tonic with a twist of lime (ersatz vodka and tonic) or tomato juice or clamato garnished with a stick of celery (which looks like a bloody mary) and no one batted an eyelash.
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
Kansan by birth! Albertan by choice! Jayhawk by the Grace of God!
  “Qui me amat, amet et canem meum. (Who loves me will love my dog also.)” 
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My Blog 'Musings of an Old Curmudgeon'


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#3
Everyone's different, but one or two beers or glasses of wine certainly aren't anything bordering on addiction where drastic action is needed. If you're drinking to just enjoy the taste and maybe a light buzz (which is usually 1 or 2 drinks max) and it hits you, you're just getting old  Sticking tongue out at you. I know that once I got to my late 20s even a couple beers late at night were bad for my sleep cycle and how I felt the next morning.

I think that the main thing is that as you get older alcohol has a much harsher impact on your body. You need to drink lots of water to rehydrate. It's probably also a good idea to not drink after dinner time (obviously the occasional social gathering may take place at night, but in a general sense).

Honestly, if you like drinking beer, wine, whisky or whatever else for the taste then drinking more than one is really unnecessary even in social gatherings. I see it as no different than partaking in a slice of cake or any other dessert; have one, maybe two and call it a day. Once you get past your early-mid 20s people aren't as much into drinking to get trashed and pressuring you to join in. If you don't care about the taste, then just stick to non-alcoholic beverages. There's nothing that you're really missing unless you really need a drink or two to loosen up at social gatherings. Also another note. If you pull the ol'switch to coke or whatever people won't notice. Also if you just relax and slowly drink your beer people usually won't realize as they're too busy being into whatever they're doing to count how many beers that you've had.
Blood of Christ, relief of the burdened, save us.

“It is my design to die in the brew house; let ale be placed in my mouth when I am expiring, that when the choirs of angels come, they may say, “Be God propitious to this drinker.” – St. Columbanus, A.D. 612

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#4
(08-30-2017, 11:31 AM)BC Wrote: Have any of you all ever given up alcohol before that you were somewhat attached to?

How did you feel? Did your life and mood improve?

I enjoy a good wine or beer at times, but have for some time felt that drinking usually leads me to poor sleep, a depressed mood the following day (even in moderation) and other regrettable decisions.  I have stopped drinking for a month or two before and have felt generally healthier, more clear-headed, etc. but it is such a substantial component to social life that it is difficult to swear off completely.

Any encouraging words or wisdom to share?
Why do you have to drink whenever you are in a social situation?  Just because others are doesn't mean you have to even though you either don't want to drink or shouldn't. If you know that drinking is not good for you, given your particular situation, you should not drink. Also, your friends should respect that. If they don't respect that, then you might look into finding some new friends.
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#5
(08-30-2017, 11:12 PM)Credidi Propter Wrote: Why do you have to drink whenever you are in a social situation?  Just because others are doesn't mean you have to even though you either don't want to drink or shouldn't. If you know that drinking is not good for you, given your particular situation, you should not drink. Also, your friends should respect that. If they don't respect that, then you might look into finding some new friends.

Thanks Credidi. I definitely do not feel compelled to drink in social situations. It was the customary habit and expectation that is just always the issue to deal with, as I am sure many people encounter.
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#6
(08-30-2017, 03:53 PM)GangGreen Wrote: Everyone's different, but one or two beers or glasses of wine certainly aren't anything bordering on addiction where drastic action is needed. If you're drinking to just enjoy the taste and maybe a light buzz (which is usually 1 or 2 drinks max) and it hits you, you're just getting old  Sticking tongue out at you. I know that once I got to my late 20s even a couple beers late at night were bad for my sleep cycle and how I felt the next morning.

I think that the main thing is that as you get older alcohol has a much harsher impact on your body. You need to drink lots of water to rehydrate. It's probably also a good idea to not drink after dinner time (obviously the occasional social gathering may take place at night, but in a general sense).

Honestly, if you like drinking beer, wine, whisky or whatever else for the taste then drinking more than one is really unnecessary even in social gatherings. I see it as no different than partaking in a slice of cake or any other dessert; have one, maybe two and call it a day. Once you get past your early-mid 20s people aren't as much into drinking to get trashed and pressuring you to join in. If you don't care about the taste, then just stick to non-alcoholic beverages. There's nothing that you're really missing unless you really need a drink or two to loosen up at social gatherings. Also another note. If you pull the ol'switch to coke or whatever people won't notice. Also if you just relax and slowly drink your beer people usually won't realize as they're too busy being into whatever they're doing to count how many beers that you've had.

Yeah, I definitely cannot handle alcohol like I used to.  It seems like even a little bit throws me off for days.  

It is strange though. I am not worried about what people think.  It's more of just the habit of doing so for a relatively long time.
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#7
You guys are right,as we get older we just cannot handle alcohol like we used to.  These days one Belgian Tripel knocks me out cold and leaves me sluggish the next day. 


If you can cut back or quit you'll feel better.
Walk before God in simplicity, and not in subtleties of the mind. Simplicity brings faith; but subtle and intricate speculations bring conceit; and conceit brings withdrawal from God. -Saint Isaac of Syria, Directions on Spiritual Training


"It is impossible in human terms to exaggerate the importance of being in a church or chapel before the Blessed Sacrament as often and for as long as our duties and state of life allow. I very seldom repeat what I say. Let me repeat this sentence. It is impossible in human language to exaggerate the importance of being in a chapel or church before the Blessed Sacrament as often and for as long as our duties and state of life allow. That sentence is the talisman of the highest sanctity. "Father John Hardon
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#8
I'm not encouraging anyone to drink, but whilst it's true I can no longer handle alcohol like I did 40 or 50 years ago, I'm 70 now, and I still think nothing of knocking back two or three Czechvars in an evening with no after effects. I do avoid the hard stuff now, tho'.
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
Kansan by birth! Albertan by choice! Jayhawk by the Grace of God!
  “Qui me amat, amet et canem meum. (Who loves me will love my dog also.)” 
St Bernard of Clairvaux

My Blog 'Musings of an Old Curmudgeon'


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#9
I work in mental health services and when someone asks us if it is ok to drink alcohol socially, the right answer is no. There is a research that shows drinking little maybe good for health but the same research also mentioned that not drinking alcohol at all is the best.

If someone is having doubts whether one should drink alcohol or not, it means that one has had enough.

Btw, I don't drink at all...what science says I follow.
The Source and Summit of the Christian Life

www.jesusandthebible.co.uk
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#10
I've been in many social gatherings with psychologists and let me tell you, they all drink.
Blood of Christ, relief of the burdened, save us.

“It is my design to die in the brew house; let ale be placed in my mouth when I am expiring, that when the choirs of angels come, they may say, “Be God propitious to this drinker.” – St. Columbanus, A.D. 612

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