Old tattoo to blame for woman's 'cancer'
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Beware Tattoos! The inks used could cause disease later in life:



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Old tattoo to blame for woman's 'cancer'

By Michael Nedelman, CNN
Updated 5:00 PM ET, Mon October 2, 2017

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Photos: A history of body art
Tattoos have never been more popular, and part of the appeal lies in the rich variety of body-art traditions of the past. This portrait shows a heavily tattooed 19th-century man known as "the Turk." He was an act in Barnum's, a European traveling circus. His tattoos were in the Burmese style, and he was said to have been kidnapped by the "barbarians" of Asia and forcibly tattooed.

Story highlights
  • Doctors suspected that a woman had lymphoma and removed a lymph node
  • But under a microscope, the "tumor" was found to be black tattoo pigment
(CNN)Doctors in Australia suspected that a woman had a type of cancer called lymphoma, but they were stunned when they put her enlarged lymph node under a microscope -- and instead found black tattoo pigment from 15 years ago to which her immune system was just now reacting.
They recounted the strange case in a report released Monday in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine.
The 30-year-old woman had come in with small lumps under her arms, which had been there for two weeks. A body scan showed even more enlarged lymph nodes in her chest, including near the roots of her lungs.
"Ninety-nine times out of 100, (this) will be lymphoma," said Dr. Christian Bryant, a hematologist at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney. Bryant is one of the woman's doctors.
[Image: 171002130633-tattoo-cancer-lymphoma-medium-plus-169.jpg]The lymph node that was removed from the woman's armpit.
Many cancers -- including lymphomas, which come from immune cells -- can cause lymph nodes to swell. Lymph nodes may also enlarge due to infection and inflammation.
In the case of the Australian woman, whose name was not released, her lymph nodes were inflamed because of a reaction to the old tattoo ink, not due to cancer cells. Doctors removed a lymph node from her armpit and found a cluster of immune cells that were loaded with black pigment. The woman had a 15-year-old tattoo covering her back, and there was a smaller, more recent one on her shoulder.
"The skin has its own immune cells that are always surveilling the skin," said Dr. Bill Stebbins, director of cosmetic dermatology at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, who was not involved in the report.
Once these immune cells found the tattoo pigment, a foreign substance, they ingested it and traveled from the skin to the lymph nodes over a period of years.
"The pigment is too large for these cells to eat and digest," Stebbins said. "That's why they're still there many years later."
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Your kids want a tattoo or piercing? Here's what pediatricians recommend
But why the woman had a reaction 15 years after her tattoo is a mystery. Something set off the immune cells, but her doctors couldn't pin down what that trigger might be, Bryant said. The patient noted that her tattoos would occasionally itch, but only for a few days each month. The type of inflammatory response found in her lymph nodes, called a granuloma, was not found in her skin.
Bryant and his colleagues had never seen anything quite like it. Other reports have described swollen, pigmented lymph nodes that were mistaken for melanoma, but this is the first time they had heard of a case with lymph nodes deep enough to fit the picture of lymphoma.
"I think there's absolutely no way to know how common it is," Bryant said. "Most people who have tattoos have absolutely no problems."
"We do a lot of tattoo removal with lasers in our practice, and sometimes we see people developing allergic reactions to the ink," said Dr. Bruce Katz, a fellow with the American Academy of Dermatology and director of the Juva Skin and Laser Center in Manhattan. Katz was not involved with the new report.
But these reactions are usually to red pigments, not black.
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Man dies after swimming with new tattoo
In the US, nearly four in 10 millennials have tattoos, according to a Pew Research Center report. Among Generation X, slightly fewer have tattoos: about 32%. For baby boomers, that number drops to 15%.
For those looking to get inked, Katz said, it's crucial to do your research: Make sure the artist is reputable, get references from clients, and ensure that they are using disposable needles and unopened ink to prevent infections.
Stebbins said it's important for people to be aware of these rare complications, because people might not realize that a tattoo can cause inflammation years later. "It's important for physicians to be aware of a tattoo history," he said.
Tattoos are often hidden from view, meaning a doctor may not notice them right away. Almost three-quarters of Americans with tattoos usually hide them under clothing, according to the Pew report.
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There are other potential complications of tattoos, including infections and other inflammatory reactions. One Texas man even died after swimming with a new tattoo, which became infected with a bacterium found in coastal waters.
But the Australian woman's case is far less serious. The last time Bryant saw her, the swollen lymph nodes had subsided.
"It's not going to cause this lady any major problems," Bryant said, "which means we're allowed to be interested without feeling sad."
The hematologist added, "My job's often not like that."
One should have an open mind; open enough that things get in, but not so open that everything falls out
 
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#2
But they are so attractive and non-conformist......
"The missionaries of the 16th century were convinced that the unbaptized person is lost forever. After the Second Vatican Council, this conviction was definitely abandoned. The result was a two-sided, deep crisis. Without this attentiveness to salvation, the Faith loses its foundation." -Benedict XVI, Avvenire interview, March 16th, 2016
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#3
It's funny because these days tattoos are anything but unique and non-conformist (and I personally find them to be hideous, especially on women). I feel like just about everyone has one. It's always interesting when people like to call something as "non-conformist" because something may not have been acceptable in the past, but yet these days everyone does it. Fun fact, you're a conformist.
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#4
It's kinda tribal, right? We adorn our bodies and our homes but our churches look like, well I won't saying it (it's too crude). But the word rhymes with frap.
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#5
(10-06-2017, 02:29 PM)GangGreen Wrote: It's funny because these days tattoos are anything but unique and non-conformist (and I personally find them to be hideous, especially on women). I feel like just about everyone has one. It's always interesting when people like to call something as "non-conformist" because something may not have been acceptable in the past, but yet these days everyone does it. Fun fact, you're a conformist.

People thought they were being unique by getting these 10, 15 years ago but now it's true that it is rare to find anyone unblemished.  The expectation is that everyone would ask them about their tattoos and they could feel special explaining what they mean to them and get attention and affirmation.

The joke is on them.  ( No offense to anyone with tattoos but you can see in the irony in how this played out).

If you want to be unique today, be counter cultural, that being, against the culture of death and ugliness.

Dress and speak in a dignified manner. Stop speaking in vocal fry and effeminate uptalk.  This phenomenon is highly disedifying and annoying.

Be articulate, avoid contractions when possible.  Stand out against the peer pressure of LGBTism, compromise, and false equality between the sexes.  

That is how to be non-conformist these days, not just coloring ones skins as if you were a canvas or building wall or a car bumper.  It takes no virtue or hard work or character to such a thing.  (Again, no offense to Catholics here with tattoos).

People who are virtuous these days are the ones who are unique and non-conformist.

Just think of face tattoos. If there was ever an indication of being psychotic, these would be it.  And you are seeing them more and more.  Certainly the saints throughout the centuries would think of such a person that he was unequivocally possessed.
"The missionaries of the 16th century were convinced that the unbaptized person is lost forever. After the Second Vatican Council, this conviction was definitely abandoned. The result was a two-sided, deep crisis. Without this attentiveness to salvation, the Faith loses its foundation." -Benedict XVI, Avvenire interview, March 16th, 2016
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#6
(10-06-2017, 09:29 PM)Jacafamala Wrote: It's kinda tribal, right? We adorn our bodies and our homes but our churches look like, well I won't saying it (it's too crude). But the word rhymes with frap.

My theory is that the appearance of mass tattooing in the formerly Civilized West corresponds with the growing lack of identity and culture.

We have lost our ethnic identities and customs and have had globalization, standardization, mass fast food, suburbia, strip malls with corporate stores and restaurants that blight the landside, decimating the distinguishing characteristics of an area so that everywhere now looks the same.

People need an identity.  They need a sense of belonging with their "Tribe."  It is a primal, natural longing.  I am inclined to believe if there had not been the slaughter of cities and breakup of ethnic neighborhoods, as well as the Roman traditional Catholic liturgy and formation of keeping good customs that make us feel apart of something greater, people would not feel the need to have to brand themselves to feel some sense of belonging.

Like the rapid, ridiculous "fans" who put forth such an emotional investment in their local professional sports teams to the point of even wanting to fight opposing fans, tattooing serves as a replacement for real culture.  

Tattoos: Rebellion or Conformity? Why Have so Many People Chosen to Have Themselves Tattooed?

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/psy...nformity-0

Tattoos could also be correlated with personality disorders. http://scholarlycommons.law.northwestern...ntext=jclc
"The missionaries of the 16th century were convinced that the unbaptized person is lost forever. After the Second Vatican Council, this conviction was definitely abandoned. The result was a two-sided, deep crisis. Without this attentiveness to salvation, the Faith loses its foundation." -Benedict XVI, Avvenire interview, March 16th, 2016
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#7
In the old days, when I was studying Psychology (ya, in ancient times), this practice was said to be an attention getter for the one tattooed. A kind of non-verbal way to get looks and feel special. These days the types of ink used is a concern, since the people concocting these tints do so unregulated and the inks can be toxic. One type, in particular, contains titanium and cannot be removed by laser techniques and has to be removed by the removal of the skin using a Dermatome, like a cheese shredder, that takes of layers of skin, a sheet at a time, until the tattoo is gone.

Not a pleasant procedure to endure and probably worse than enduring the length of exposure to the electric needle that put it there in the first place.
One should have an open mind; open enough that things get in, but not so open that everything falls out
 
A democracy which makes or even effectively prepares for modern, scientific war must necessarily cease to be democratic. No country can be really well prepared for modern war unless it is governed by a tyrant, at the head of a highly trained and perfectly obedient bureaucracy
Huxley
 
The world will not be destroyed by those who do evil, but by those who watch them without doing anything  
Einstein
 
Its no wonder truth is stranger than fiction.
Fiction has to make sense
Mark Twain
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#8
(10-09-2017, 03:12 PM)Zedta Wrote: In the old days, when I was studying Psychology (ya, in ancient times), this practice was said to be an attention getter for the one tattooed. A kind of non-verbal way to get looks and feel special. These days the types of ink used is a concern, since the people concocting these tints do so unregulated and the inks can be toxic. One type, in particular, contains titanium and cannot be removed by laser techniques and has to be removed by the removal of the skin using a Dermatome, like a cheese shredder, that takes of layers of skin, a sheet at a time, until the tattoo is gone.

Not a pleasant procedure to endure and probably worse than enduring the length of exposure to the electric needle that put it there in the first place.

In short, please kids just don't do it....
"The missionaries of the 16th century were convinced that the unbaptized person is lost forever. After the Second Vatican Council, this conviction was definitely abandoned. The result was a two-sided, deep crisis. Without this attentiveness to salvation, the Faith loses its foundation." -Benedict XVI, Avvenire interview, March 16th, 2016
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#9
Apropos the subject of this thread. From The Imaginative Conservative, Gnostic Bodies: Why Millennials Love Tattoos.
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#10
(10-10-2017, 05:29 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: Apropos the subject of this thread. From The Imaginative Conservative, Gnostic Bodies: Why Millennials Love Tattoos.

Very descriptive writing and provocative comments. Some insightful ideas there to ponder on the psychological reasons for sleeve tattoing.
"The missionaries of the 16th century were convinced that the unbaptized person is lost forever. After the Second Vatican Council, this conviction was definitely abandoned. The result was a two-sided, deep crisis. Without this attentiveness to salvation, the Faith loses its foundation." -Benedict XVI, Avvenire interview, March 16th, 2016
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