Interview with Mysterious Author of ‘The Dictator Pope’
#1
From LifeSiteNews:



Tue Dec 12, 2017 - 12:59 pm EST
EXCLUSIVE: LifeSite interviews mysterious author of ‘The Dictator Pope’


ROME, December 12, 2017 (LifeSiteNews) — “The popular image of Pope Francis is one of the most extraordinary deceptions of the present time,” Marcantonio Colonna, author of The Dictator Pope, has said in a new interview with LifeSiteNews.


The explosive new book, which first appeared in Italian and then in English on December 4, has provoked praise and consternation and drawn considerable attention, particularly in Catholic media.

The author assumes the pseudonym of a real historical figure named Marcantonio Colonna. Born in 1535, Colonna was an Italian aristocrat who served as a Viceroy of Sicily and is best remembered for his service as admiral of the papal fleet in the Battle of Lepanto.

About the author’s true identity, we are only told in the brief biographical note accompanying the book that he is “a graduate of Oxford University and has extensive experience of historical and other research. He has been living in Rome since the beginning of Pope Francis’s pontificate, and his book is the fruit of close contacts with many of those working in the Vatican, including the leading Cardinals and other figures mentioned in the narrative.”

In an email exchange with Marcantonio Colonna, we discussed why he wrote The Dictator Pope, what he hopes the book will achieve, and the most surprising discovery he made in his research.


LifeSite: Why did you write ‘The Dictator Pope’?

Colonna: The popular image of Pope Francis is one of the most extraordinary deceptions of the present time, and contrasts totally with the reality of Bergoglio’s character as it was known in Argentina before his election and is known in the Vatican today. My aim was to let the cat out of the bag and to set out, in a series of studies of policies followed over the past five years, the true nature of Francis’s pontificate.


What do you hope the book will achieve?

I don’t know whether my book could have the effect of encouraging cardinals and other churchmen to tell Francis, “The game’s up.” Perhaps not. But what I principally had in mind was trying to avoid a similar mistake being made again in the next Conclave. My aim was to expose the myth of the supposedly liberal Pope who was elected in 2013 and to urge the cardinals at the next Conclave to avoid electing an unknown figure who turns out to be quite different from what he had been thought.


If your main concern is to see that a similar mistake not be made at the next Conclave, why did you not simply send a report privately to the cardinals. Why go public? Some readers may wonder if the book might do more harm than good, by fostering division and ill will toward Pope Francis among the faithful.

The notion that the College of Cardinals as a whole would read a 60,000-word book sent to them privately is wholly unrealistic. Moreover, the book needs to have the credibility that comes from having been made public and recognized as true by those who know the Vatican. And the cardinals do not make their choice in a vacuum. When they vote in the next Conclave, it needs to be in a context in which the whole Church has recognized the imposture that has been practiced upon it and realizes that we need a Pope who is primarily a man of God and not a politician.


What did you find most interesting, surprising, or shocking in your research?

In fact my book is mainly based on a long series of articles which have already exposed many aspects of Francis's pontificate, but the world's media have preferred to take no notice of them. A personal contribution of mine has been to transmit to the rest of the world the estimate of Bergoglio that had long been held in Argentina. In researching Bergoglio’s past, one of the most significant pieces of evidence I came across was the report written by his religious superior [Father Peter Hans Kolvenbach] in 1991 when it was proposed to make Bergoglio a bishop. The Jesuit General wrote that Bergoglio was not suitable for such an appointment, that he was a man of devious character, lacking psychological balance, and had been a divisive figure as Provincial of the Jesuits in Argentina. The existence of this report has long been known, and I received the account of it from a priest who read the document himself at the time.


What’s your overall view of Pope Francis in light of what you discovered?

My view of Pope Francis is mainly formed from researching his Argentinian background. He emerges as a flawed character, who is capable of impressing people profoundly and forming warm friendships, but who, as one of his priest friends remarked, “manipulates people through the affections.” This characteristic has enabled him to establish a skillful ascendancy over his subordinates in Rome, as he had done previously in Buenos Aires. Bergoglio is also very much the product of the peculiar political culture of Argentina, formed by the populist dictator Juan Perón, of whom Bergoglio was a follower from his early years, and whom he very much resembles in his style of government.


How does this compare with pontificates of the past?

Francis’s pontificate is absolutely unique in modern times, and can only be compared to a few disastrous pontificates of the past, when the cardinals manifestly made a mistake in their selection. This is bound to happen from time to time, but we have to go back a long way for any earlier precedent, and it’s not surprising that people will find it difficult to believe that such a total mistake could have been made.


Even some who have praised the book for its thorough research call it tendentious. How do you defend these claims?

My book can only be called tendentious in the sense that it makes a case; but it makes it on the basis of a vast array of facts, which are fairly presented. By contrast, the current public image of Pope Francis is a PR exercise which bears no relation to reality.


The book is well researched and heavily footnoted, but not where you speak of allegations that the Vatican made financial contributions to Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign. Why did you include these allegations in the book?

This accusation was made to me unambiguously by a contact in the Vatican, whose identity I have to protect. However, the allegation is quite well known to journalists. With this and other scandals I mention, my desire was to encourage further investigation by researchers who are better qualified than I am to delve into financial matters.


The Vatican is reportedly seeking your true identity. Why did you use a pseudonym? And are you afraid of reprisals?

Sadly, what emerges in the book is Pope Francis’ tendency to vindictiveness. The present-day Curia lives in a state of fear that any criticism of the Pope will lead to dismissal, as it did in the case of three officials of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith who were summarily dismissed by Francis without explanation. Those who wish to tell the truth are therefore compelled to anonymity, to protect not only themselves but those around them.
T h e   D u d e t t e   A b i d e s
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#2
If there was one thing I could tell the publisher about this book, it would be to PRINT IT. We are not so far removed from printed books that this should be a problem. I don’t do ebooks, and I’m not alone. More than that, it would be helpful to have such a book to give away. A lot of people will read a book if you put it in their hands. If all you do is talk about it, they just nod and smile politely.
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#3
(12-13-2017, 01:17 AM)Credidi Propter Wrote: If there was one thing I could tell the publisher about this book, it would be to PRINT IT. We are not so far removed from printed books that this should be a problem. I don’t do ebooks, and I’m not alone. More than that, it would be helpful to have such a book to give away. A lot of people will read a book if you put it in their hands. If all you do is talk about it, they just nod and smile politely.

I agree totally. Reading short segmented pieces on a computer is fine, but I do not see how people can enjoy reading a book on a kindle or computer.  It just does not feel right to me.  I like to have that physical book sensorily in my hands, flipping pages.  Call me old-fashioned..
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#4
(12-13-2017, 09:34 AM)BC Wrote:
(12-13-2017, 01:17 AM)Credidi Propter Wrote: If there was one thing I could tell the publisher about this book, it would be to PRINT IT. We are not so far removed from printed books that this should be a problem. I don’t do ebooks, and I’m not alone. More than that, it would be helpful to have such a book to give away. A lot of people will read a book if you put it in their hands. If all you do is talk about it, they just nod and smile politely.

I agree totally. Reading short segmented pieces on a computer is fine, but I do not see how people can enjoy reading a book on a kindle or computer.  It just does not feel right to me.  I like to have that physical book sensorily in my hands, flipping pages.  Call me old-fashioned..

Oooooold-fashioned! :D

But seriously, who isn't old-fashioned on this forum? It's kind of our thing.  :)
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#5
(12-13-2017, 09:38 AM)In His Love Wrote:
(12-13-2017, 09:34 AM)BC Wrote:
(12-13-2017, 01:17 AM)Credidi Propter Wrote: If there was one thing I could tell the publisher about this book, it would be to PRINT IT. We are not so far removed from printed books that this should be a problem. I don’t do ebooks, and I’m not alone. More than that, it would be helpful to have such a book to give away. A lot of people will read a book if you put it in their hands. If all you do is talk about it, they just nod and smile politely.

I agree totally. Reading short segmented pieces on a computer is fine, but I do not see how people can enjoy reading a book on a kindle or computer.  It just does not feel right to me.  I like to have that physical book sensorily in my hands, flipping pages.  Call me old-fashioned..

Oooooold-fashioned! :D

But seriously, who isn't old-fashioned on this forum? It's kind of our thing.  :)

Yeahh I have always felt like an old soul in younger man's body.  I wonder if this kind of personality is more disposed to traditional Catholicism.
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#6
I agree, but must confess to using kindle. I pre-ordered the book. The one valuable feature to Kindle is the linked footnotes that will link to the corresponding article on the internet.
"Memento, homo, quia pulvis es, et in pulverem reverteris"
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#7
(12-13-2017, 09:34 AM)BC Wrote:
(12-13-2017, 01:17 AM)Credidi Propter Wrote: If there was one thing I could tell the publisher about this book, it would be to PRINT IT. We are not so far removed from printed books that this should be a problem. I don’t do ebooks, and I’m not alone. More than that, it would be helpful to have such a book to give away. A lot of people will read a book if you put it in their hands. If all you do is talk about it, they just nod and smile politely.

I agree totally. Reading short segmented pieces on a computer is fine, but I do not see how people can enjoy reading a book on a kindle or computer.  It just does not feel right to me.  I like to have that physical book sensorily in my hands, flipping pages.  Call me old-fashioned..

I feel the same way, although at times in the past I've used kindle when there wasn't another option.  Not the actual device, but I used the app on my laptop.  The reason being that I really like mystery novels, and many of them simply aren't available anywhere other than on kindle/nook.  The upside is that you can get some really good deals.  I was able to download everything ever written by GK Chesterton (including his more obscure writings) for like 2.99.  I still prefer to build up my physical library, especially for lending books to others.
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#8
Despite my innate conservative. Traditionalist makeup, I've come to terms with e-readers for a variety of reasons. One is just room. I have limited storage for books, but I have 747 books currently on my Kindle. Another reason is cost. Many of the books I read are available gratis on Kindle or are much, much cheaper than physical books. Another reason, allied to cost, is that many of the books I want are no longer available in hard copy except from antiquarian booksellers at great cost. These same books are often avaliable free on Internet Archive or Gutenberg. 

Of course, I've been acclimated to computer screens since I first worked on and learned to program on a $6,000,000 computer some 45 years ago. To me, they're still cutting edge technology, since when I started, we were still working with hollerith cards (punch cards to those old enough to remember!) and CRTs were just becoming available.
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
Kansan by birth! Albertan by choice! Jayhawk by the Grace of God!
  “Qui me amat, amet et canem meum. (Who loves me will love my dog also.)” 
St Bernard of Clairvaux

My Blog 'Musings of an Old Curmudgeon'


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#9
While I understand the disinclination toward screens of various sorts in this regard, I must point out two things: the preponderance of now-public domain, faithful Catholic literature, freely available online, and if I'm not mistaken, that this is self-published. At least, the latter is something I seem to remember having read about the book at either Rorate or OnePeterFive. I'm not disagreeing with you about the joys of reading actual, as opposed to virtual books, as I share those joys. Of the 763 items currently on my aging Kindle, the vast majority are Catholic and public domain. So, while it lacks those tangibles we love, it has some merits, even if paltry by comparison.

About the publishing, I found this here: "Some of you have asked me if there’s a physical copy available, or just an ebook. For the moment, the answer is just an ebook. I’ve been in contact over the past few days with some people with knowledge of the book’s production, and they’ve told me there’s an interest in producing a physical copy, but it’s still in the planning stages.1 (You’ll note that the ebook was self-published; this is one of the most efficient ways to get a text out and into the hands of as many people as possible as quickly as possible.)"
Eternal Father, I offer Thee the most precious blood of Thy Divine Son, Jesus, in union with the Masses said Throughout the world today, for all the holy souls in Purgatory. Amen.
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