Attention-Deficit And Autism
#11
(01-05-2018, 12:40 PM)Zedta Wrote:
(01-05-2018, 07:46 AM)Jeeter Wrote: Yep, my middle boy (10) is like that.  He was diagnosed with severe ADHD and some writing issue I can't remember the name of; basically it's like there's no switch between his brain and hand. 
Perhaps you mean Dysgraphia, a disorder that is similar to dyslexia, which is something I had issues with and still do at times. Good to hear you escaped the Big Pharma lie that leads you into their trap of dependency.

BTW: Dyspraxia is a physical coordination disorder. It can often be so severe as to make the victim unable to write or have other motor coordination issues that are debilitating.

Zedta, I have taught several students with dyspaxia and its most common effect (in the relatively moderate cases I've seen) is that the physical act of writing letters and words requires so much concentration that the child cannot concentrate on both composing ideas and writing them down at the same time.  The coordination issues disrupt the ability to communicate through writing.  Dysgraphia is pretty similar though.  Honestly, I think the interventions used to help students in both cases are pretty much the same.  

Jeeter, isn't it amazing the impact those chemicals have on a child's brain.  Have you tried caffeine to treat the ADHD?  From what I understand, the child's body actually slows down with the coffee etc.  It might help . . .
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#12
(01-05-2018, 01:09 PM)Fontevrault Wrote: Jeeter, isn't it amazing the impact those chemicals have on a child's brain. 

It is. And scary!

Quote:Have you tried caffeine to treat the ADHD?  From what I understand, the child's body actually slows down with the coffee etc.  It might help . . .

We have actually, and it seems to be working wonders. We give him some black tea in the morning before school. His focus isn't as intense as when he was on Ritalin, but his mood is much better; he doesn't go through an angry period at the end of the day when he's coming down. Plus he has an appetite again. He's pretty much his normal, happy really active self. On that note, we give him Red Bull, Red Fanta, and chocolate covered espresso beans before going to stay with my MIL.
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#13
(01-05-2018, 01:09 PM)Fontevrault Wrote: Zedta, I have taught several students with dyspaxia and its most common effect (in the relatively moderate cases I've seen) is that the physical act of writing letters and words requires so much concentration that the child cannot concentrate on both composing ideas and writing them down at the same time.  The coordination issues disrupt the ability to communicate through writing.  Dysgraphia is pretty similar though.  Honestly, I think the interventions used to help students in both cases are pretty much the same.  
Not to be argumentitive, but I realize you have taught children with some degree of disability, but I am more of a diagnostician in these things. Dyspaxia and dysgraphia are different and only similar in some instances in effect.

Specifically:


Quote:Dyspraxia, a form of developmental coordination disorder (DCD) is a common disorder affecting fine and/or gross motor coordination in children and adults. It may also affect speech. DCD is a lifelong condition [emphasis mine], formally recognized by international organizations including the World Health Organization.


VS:


Quote:Dysgraphia

Dysgraphia is a deficiency in the ability to write, primarily handwriting, but also coherence [emphasis mine]. Dysgraphia is a transcription disability, meaning that it is a writing disorder associated with impaired handwriting, orthographic coding, and finger sequencing. It often overlaps with other learning disabilities such as speech impairment, attention deficit disorder, or developmental coordination disorder. [again, emphasis mine] In the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, dysgraphia is characterized as a learning disability in the category of written expression when one’s writing skills are below those expected given a person’s age measured through intelligence and age-appropriate education. The DSM is not clear in whether or not writing refers only to the motor skills involved in writing, or if it also includes orthographic skills and spelling



Dysgraphia as opposed to dypraxia: Dysgraphia is a learning disorder, not a coordination disorder and can be outgrown. Dyspraxia is often a lifelong problem and is a motor coordination disorder, or a physical disorder.

From what Jeeter wrote:


Quote:Jeeter Wrote: Yep, my middle boy (10) is like that.  He was diagnosed with severe ADHD and some writing issue I can't remember the name of; basically it's like there's no switch between his brain and hand.

Dysgraphia more closely fits the symptomology Jeeter describes.

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