What should be done with protestant bibles
#1
I recently had a friend tell me today that a protestant gave him a protestant bible

He asked me what he should do with it I told him that the Church recommends that the protestant bible be destroyed or thrown away in the garbage since it is dangerous to Our Faith and Morals.

He asked me if I can find anything related to the subject of the proper way to deal with protestant bibles such as a Church Document or Encyclical

I am having a hard time finding a document about the subject can anyone help me
Reply
#2
From the Catechism of St Pius X:


Quote:32 Q: What should a Christian do who has been given a Bible by a Protestant or by an agent of the Protestants?

A: A Christian to whom a Bible has been offered by a Protestant or an agent of the Protestants should reject it with disgust, because it is forbidden by the Church. If it was accepted by inadvertence, it must be burnt as soon as possible or handed in to the Parish Priest.
However, given most Parish Priests today, I would recommend the first course.
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
Kansan by birth! Albertan by choice! Jayhawk by the Grace of God!
  “Qui me amat, amet et canem meum. (Who loves me will love my dog also.)” 
St Bernard of Clairvaux

My Blog 'Musings of an Old Curmudgeon'


[-] The following 1 user Likes jovan66102's post:
  • RyanPatrick
Reply
#3
I heard it said that the so called, Dead Sea Scrolls were a collection of scribe's copying the Biblical Scriptures that contained errors. They could not desecrate any form of the Word of God, since the pages of the erroneous copies contains much that was not in error, so they placed them in these clay pots and hid them in the cave.

I suppose from this, that any fragment of the Word of God is sacred and must be treated so, that would mean burning the error filled books as Jovan66102 posted.
One should have an open mind; open enough that things get in, but not so open that everything falls out
Art Bell
 
The individual is handicapped by coming face to face with a conspiracy so monstrous that he cannot believe it exists.
J Edgar Hoover

 
I don't need a good memory, because I always tell the truth.
Jessie Ventura

 
Its no wonder truth is stranger than fiction.
Fiction has to make sense
Mark Twain

If history doesn't repeat itself, it sure does rhyme.
Mark Twain
Reply
#4
(01-11-2018, 07:01 PM)Zedta Wrote: I heard it said that the so called, Dead Sea Scrolls were a collection of scribe's copying the Biblical Scriptures that contained errors. They could not desecrate any form of the Word of God, since the pages of the erroneous copies contains much that was not in error, so they placed them in these clay pots and hid them in the cave.

I suppose from this, that any fragment of the Word of God is sacred and must be treated so, that would mean burning the error filled books as Jovan66102 posted.

I believe this is a Jewish tradition still practiced among more orthodox Jews today.

Im going on a tangent because you bring up an interesting point.

If what you say is true then you've got some sort of paradox going. If I were to write down the entire Catholic Bible we can all agree that it's Sacred Scripture. Likewise I think we can agree that if I were to just write the old testament or even just the book of Genesis then that would still be sacred scrpture. 

Now what if I were to write only chapter 1 of Genesis, is it still scripture? How about just "In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth"? Or perhaps just "In the beginning"? Or just "In"? Or even "I"?

Oobviously I'm being pedantic but I'm feeling philosophical so humor me.

At what point do ordinary words become the Word of God and thus must be respected as such?
Surréxit Dóminus vere, Alleluia!
Reply
#5
(01-11-2018, 07:36 PM)Dominicus Wrote:
(01-11-2018, 07:01 PM)Zedta Wrote: I heard it said that the so called, Dead Sea Scrolls were a collection of scribe's copying the Biblical Scriptures that contained errors. They could not desecrate any form of the Word of God, since the pages of the erroneous copies contains much that was not in error, so they placed them in these clay pots and hid them in the cave.

I suppose from this, that any fragment of the Word of God is sacred and must be treated so, that would mean burning the error filled books as Jovan66102 posted.

I believe this is a Jewish tradition still practiced among more orthodox Jews today.

Im going on a tangent because you bring up an interesting point.

If what you say is true then you've got some sort of paradox going. If I were to write down the entire Catholic Bible we can all agree that it's Sacred Scripture. Likewise I think we can agree that if I were to just write the old testament or even just the book of Genesis then that would still be sacred scrpture. 

Now what if I were to write only chapter 1 of Genesis, is it still scripture? How about just "In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth"? Or perhaps just "In the beginning"? Or just "In"? Or even "I"?

Obviously I'm being pedantic but I'm feeling philosophical so humor me.

At what point do ordinary words become the Word of God and thus must be respected as such?

Interesting point of view and I have no answer for you, since what I posited  was a supposition anyway. Makes one really wonder, huh?
One should have an open mind; open enough that things get in, but not so open that everything falls out
Art Bell
 
The individual is handicapped by coming face to face with a conspiracy so monstrous that he cannot believe it exists.
J Edgar Hoover

 
I don't need a good memory, because I always tell the truth.
Jessie Ventura

 
Its no wonder truth is stranger than fiction.
Fiction has to make sense
Mark Twain

If history doesn't repeat itself, it sure does rhyme.
Mark Twain
Reply
#6
(01-11-2018, 07:52 PM)Zedta Wrote:
(01-11-2018, 07:36 PM)Dominicus Wrote:
(01-11-2018, 07:01 PM)Zedta Wrote: I heard it said that the so called, Dead Sea Scrolls were a collection of scribe's copying the Biblical Scriptures that contained errors. They could not desecrate any form of the Word of God, since the pages of the erroneous copies contains much that was not in error, so they placed them in these clay pots and hid them in the cave.

I suppose from this, that any fragment of the Word of God is sacred and must be treated so, that would mean burning the error filled books as Jovan66102 posted.

I believe this is a Jewish tradition still practiced among more orthodox Jews today.

Im going on a tangent because you bring up an interesting point.

If what you say is true then you've got some sort of paradox going. If I were to write down the entire Catholic Bible we can all agree that it's Sacred Scripture. Likewise I think we can agree that if I were to just write the old testament or even just the book of Genesis then that would still be sacred scrpture. 

Now what if I were to write only chapter 1 of Genesis, is it still scripture? How about just "In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth"? Or perhaps just "In the beginning"? Or just "In"? Or even "I"?

Obviously I'm being pedantic but I'm feeling philosophical so humor me.

At what point do ordinary words become the Word of God and thus must be respected as such?

Interesting point of view and I have no answer for you, since what I posited  was a supposition anyway. Makes one really wonder, huh?

This is something that actually has practical applications.  I have a tendancy of scribbling on shreds of scratch paper, and sometimes I will write the Ave Maria or the Our Father and then I have an internal moral battle about whether or not throwing it away constitutes sacrilege.  I usually just shred the paper or burn it.  So this would in fact be a nice thing to have figured out
Rejoice, O Virgin Theotokos, o Mary full of grace, the Lord is with thee! Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, for thou hast borne the Saviour and the Redeemer of our souls!

                                                      [Image: hailmary.jpg]
Reply
#7
If you're going to go to that level, what about all of the stuff that we get in the mail asking for donations? They often quote scripture, put in prayers and things of that nature. I think we can these things too far, no?
Blood of Christ, relief of the burdened, save us.

“It is my design to die in the brew house; let ale be placed in my mouth when I am expiring, that when the choirs of angels come, they may say, “Be God propitious to this drinker.” – St. Columbanus, A.D. 612
[-] The following 1 user Likes GangGreen's post:
  • jovan66102
Reply
#8
I will only disagree with the Catechism of St. Pius X in one area: it is more prudent to accept the protestant Bible, though not with thanks but rather with disgust, and then to burn it so that it poses no danger of falling into the hands of a weak faith.
"Punishment is justice for the unjust." Saint Augustine of Hippo
[-] The following 2 users Like RyanPatrick's post:
  • jovan66102, MagisterMusicae
Reply
#9
(01-16-2018, 10:24 AM)RyanPatrick Wrote: I will only disagree with the Catechism of St. Pius X in one area: it is more prudent to accept the protestant Bible, though not with thanks but rather with disgust, and then to burn it so that it poses no danger of falling into the hands of a weak faith.

You could do both an act of Charity to the Protestant and others.

Accept it, and set it on fire right there ... two birds with one stone (that was rejected by the builders of this false sect).
[-] The following 2 users Like MagisterMusicae's post:
  • jovan66102, RyanPatrick
Reply
#10
My understanding was that the Church was no longer in the business of banning books. I agree that one should not make a Protestant Bible their primary Bible, but surely the simple act of owning one is morally indifferent. For instance, a translator might wish to keep various translations to see the different approaches that have been used. I myself keep Protestant Bibles, as well as sacred texts from other faiths, to study and understand differences among them.

I could be wrong, but this (in the Catechism of St Pius X) seems to me like a sensible pastoral prohibition from a time when books, including Bibles, were rarer and more expensive, when one might reasonably expect that most people only have access to one Bible. Obviously, we are in a much different situation today.

Someone representing the Gideon's who was proselytizing on a street corner handed me a free pocket Bible (KJV, NT, Proverbs and Psalms). I keep it in my travel bag and use it for reading and meditation where I don't have access to other Bibles. This practice has always seemed to me harmless enough, if not, to the contrary, quite profitable.

In the odd event that I came across something troubling, something that provokes doubts--which has not happened, nor can I honestly imagine happening, given how occasionally I use it--I would follow up with it later using a different translation, a commentary, various online resources, or meet with a priest, etc. In short, I would be easily able to do any number of things to address that doubt before falling away from the Church, which perhaps would not have been true 100+ years ago.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)