Ordination of a 'Deaconess'
#1
Twenty-four year old Ani-Kristi Manvelian, an anesthesiologist by profession, was ordained as deaconess in the Cathedral of St. Gregory the Illuminator of Tehran last September by Archbishop Sebouh Sarkissian, the Primate of the Armenian apostolic Archdiocese of Teheran.
Ani-Kristi Manvelian - reports the blog oxbridgepartners.com - is a lay person and does not belong to any female monastic congregation. Her ordination took place while the Armenian Apostolic Church has yet to formally restore the office of female diaconate. "What I have done is in conformity with the Tradition of the Church and nothing else", said Archbishop Sarkissian, whose archdiocese falls under the jurisdiction of the Catholicos of the Great House of Cilicia of the Armenians. The Archbishop also stated that his decision was to "revitalise the participation of women also in our church’s liturgical life".
Among the Eastern Churches, also the Synod of the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Alexandria in Egypt, in November 2016 (see Fides 19/11/2016) had decided to restore the institute of female deacons, and had appointed a commission of Bishops "for a thorough examination of the matter".
The discussion on the possibility of restoring female deacons and on the potential role of female deacons in the pastoral activities and missionary animation has been open for some time within the Chalcedon Orthodoxy theological institutions. (GV) (Agenzia Fides, 15/1/2018)


http://www.fides.org/en/news/63569-ASIA_...lic_Church

This has the potential of making the Armenian Orthodox's ordinations invalid.
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#2
(01-16-2018, 02:00 AM)Poche Wrote: Twenty-four year old Ani-Kristi Manvelian, an anesthesiologist by profession, was ordained as deaconess in the Cathedral of St. Gregory the Illuminator of Tehran last September by Archbishop Sebouh Sarkissian, the Primate of the Armenian apostolic Archdiocese of Teheran.
Ani-Kristi Manvelian - reports the blog oxbridgepartners.com - is a lay person and does not belong to any female monastic congregation. Her ordination took place while the Armenian Apostolic Church has yet to formally restore the office of female diaconate. "What I have done is in conformity with the Tradition of the Church and nothing else", said Archbishop Sarkissian, whose archdiocese falls under the jurisdiction of the Catholicos of the Great House of Cilicia of the Armenians. The Archbishop also stated that his decision was to "revitalise the participation of women also in our church’s liturgical life".
Among the Eastern Churches, also the Synod of the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Alexandria in Egypt, in November 2016 (see Fides 19/11/2016) had decided to restore the institute of female deacons, and had appointed a commission of Bishops "for a thorough examination of the matter".
The discussion on the possibility of restoring female deacons and on the potential role of female deacons in the pastoral activities and missionary animation has been open for some time within the Chalcedon Orthodoxy theological institutions. (GV) (Agenzia Fides, 15/1/2018)


http://www.fides.org/en/news/63569-ASIA_...lic_Church

This has the potential of making the Armenian Orthodox's ordinations invalid.

The office of deaconess never fully died out in the Armenian Apostolic Church; there are photographs from the early 20th century of deaconesses. They have historically mostly functioned only within women's monasteries, much less frequently in parishes. They vest like male deacons, though they cross their stole over the opposite shoulder and stand apart from the male deacons during the Divine Liturgy. The Eastern Churches generally do not make as sharp a distinction between the seven sacraments and sacramentals, so the lines are more blurred looking at them through a Roman lens.

I don't see how this move could make Armenian ordinations invalid. If you are saying these ordinations do not ordain women to the first degree of Holy Orders, I would say of course - no other position is possible according to Catholic doctrine. But it has no effect on the ordination of men to any degree of orders; nothing is changing in the ordination rites for men.

Also, the ordination of women to the diaconate in the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Alexandria has been overblown; in fact, it was not an ordination properly called. The rite for the ordination of a deaconess was not used; it is more accurate to say they were blessed for particular ministries. It is true that in centuries past (as in over a millennium ago), the Church of Constantinople did ordain women with the same rite they ordained men, exchanging references to St. Phoebe for references to St. Stephen in the rite, but that ritual has been defunct for a very long time.
O unashamed intercessor of Christians, ever loyal advocate before the Creator, do not disregard the prayerful voice of sinners but in your goodness hasten to assist us who trustfully cry out to you: Intercede always, O Mother of God, in behalf of those who honor you!
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#3
(01-17-2018, 12:30 PM)aquinas138 Wrote:
(01-16-2018, 02:00 AM)Poche Wrote: Twenty-four year old Ani-Kristi Manvelian, an anesthesiologist by profession, was ordained as deaconess in the Cathedral of St. Gregory the Illuminator of Tehran last September by Archbishop Sebouh Sarkissian, the Primate of the Armenian apostolic Archdiocese of Teheran.
Ani-Kristi Manvelian - reports the blog oxbridgepartners.com - is a lay person and does not belong to any female monastic congregation. Her ordination took place while the Armenian Apostolic Church has yet to formally restore the office of female diaconate. "What I have done is in conformity with the Tradition of the Church and nothing else", said Archbishop Sarkissian, whose archdiocese falls under the jurisdiction of the Catholicos of the Great House of Cilicia of the Armenians. The Archbishop also stated that his decision was to "revitalise the participation of women also in our church’s liturgical life".
Among the Eastern Churches, also the Synod of the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Alexandria in Egypt, in November 2016 (see Fides 19/11/2016) had decided to restore the institute of female deacons, and had appointed a commission of Bishops "for a thorough examination of the matter".
The discussion on the possibility of restoring female deacons and on the potential role of female deacons in the pastoral activities and missionary animation has been open for some time within the Chalcedon Orthodoxy theological institutions. (GV) (Agenzia Fides, 15/1/2018)


http://www.fides.org/en/news/63569-ASIA_...lic_Church

This has the potential of making the Armenian Orthodox's ordinations invalid.

The office of deaconess never fully died out in the Armenian Apostolic Church; there are photographs from the early 20th century of deaconesses. They have historically mostly functioned only within women's monasteries, much less frequently in parishes. They vest like male deacons, though they cross their stole over the opposite shoulder and stand apart from the male deacons during the Divine Liturgy. The Eastern Churches generally do not make as sharp a distinction between the seven sacraments and sacramentals, so the lines are more blurred looking at them through a Roman lens.

I don't see how this move could make Armenian ordinations invalid. If you are saying these ordinations do not ordain women to the first degree of Holy Orders, I would say of course - no other position is possible according to Catholic doctrine. But it has no effect on the ordination of men to any degree of orders; nothing is changing in the ordination rites for men.

Also, the ordination of women to the diaconate in the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Alexandria has been overblown; in fact, it was not an ordination properly called. The rite for the ordination of a deaconess was not used; it is more accurate to say they were blessed for particular ministries. It is true that in centuries past (as in over a millennium ago), the Church of Constantinople did ordain women with the same rite they ordained men, exchanging references to St. Phoebe for references to St. Stephen in the rite, but that ritual has been defunct for a very long time.

Do the eastern rites in full communion with the Catholic Church ordain deaconesses?
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#4
(01-19-2018, 03:01 AM)Poche Wrote:
(01-17-2018, 12:30 PM)aquinas138 Wrote:
(01-16-2018, 02:00 AM)Poche Wrote: Twenty-four year old Ani-Kristi Manvelian, an anesthesiologist by profession, was ordained as deaconess in the Cathedral of St. Gregory the Illuminator of Tehran last September by Archbishop Sebouh Sarkissian, the Primate of the Armenian apostolic Archdiocese of Teheran.
Ani-Kristi Manvelian - reports the blog oxbridgepartners.com - is a lay person and does not belong to any female monastic congregation. Her ordination took place while the Armenian Apostolic Church has yet to formally restore the office of female diaconate. "What I have done is in conformity with the Tradition of the Church and nothing else", said Archbishop Sarkissian, whose archdiocese falls under the jurisdiction of the Catholicos of the Great House of Cilicia of the Armenians. The Archbishop also stated that his decision was to "revitalise the participation of women also in our church’s liturgical life".
Among the Eastern Churches, also the Synod of the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Alexandria in Egypt, in November 2016 (see Fides 19/11/2016) had decided to restore the institute of female deacons, and had appointed a commission of Bishops "for a thorough examination of the matter".
The discussion on the possibility of restoring female deacons and on the potential role of female deacons in the pastoral activities and missionary animation has been open for some time within the Chalcedon Orthodoxy theological institutions. (GV) (Agenzia Fides, 15/1/2018)


http://www.fides.org/en/news/63569-ASIA_...lic_Church

This has the potential of making the Armenian Orthodox's ordinations invalid.

The office of deaconess never fully died out in the Armenian Apostolic Church; there are photographs from the early 20th century of deaconesses. They have historically mostly functioned only within women's monasteries, much less frequently in parishes. They vest like male deacons, though they cross their stole over the opposite shoulder and stand apart from the male deacons during the Divine Liturgy. The Eastern Churches generally do not make as sharp a distinction between the seven sacraments and sacramentals, so the lines are more blurred looking at them through a Roman lens.

I don't see how this move could make Armenian ordinations invalid. If you are saying these ordinations do not ordain women to the first degree of Holy Orders, I would say of course - no other position is possible according to Catholic doctrine. But it has no effect on the ordination of men to any degree of orders; nothing is changing in the ordination rites for men.

Also, the ordination of women to the diaconate in the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Alexandria has been overblown; in fact, it was not an ordination properly called. The rite for the ordination of a deaconess was not used; it is more accurate to say they were blessed for particular ministries. It is true that in centuries past (as in over a millennium ago), the Church of Constantinople did ordain women with the same rite they ordained men, exchanging references to St. Phoebe for references to St. Stephen in the rite, but that ritual has been defunct for a very long time.

Do the eastern rites in full communion with the Catholic Church ordain deaconesses?

To my knowledge, they do not, but I don't really know. I doubt it happens outside of women monasteries, if it happens at all, and even then I would imagine only in the Armenian Church.
O unashamed intercessor of Christians, ever loyal advocate before the Creator, do not disregard the prayerful voice of sinners but in your goodness hasten to assist us who trustfully cry out to you: Intercede always, O Mother of God, in behalf of those who honor you!
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