Septuagesima
#1
Why did Paul VI do away with Septuagesima in the Catholic calendar? 

It is such a wonderful preparation for Lent.
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#2
(01-26-2018, 10:17 AM)Julia Augusta Wrote: Why did Paul VI do away with Septuagesima in the Catholic calendar? 

It is such a wonderful preparation for Lent.

The same reason as much of the reform: Bugnini.


Quote:There was disagreement on the suppression of the Septuagesima season. Some saw these weeks as a step toward Easter. On one occasion Pope Paul VI compared the complex made up of Septuagesima, Lent, Holy Week and Easter Triduum, to the bells calling people to Sunday Mass. The ringing of them an hour, a half-hour, fifteen and five minutes before the time of Mass has a psychological effect and prepares the faithful materially and spiritually for the celebration of the liturgy. Then, however, the view prevailed that there should be a simplification: it was not possible to restore Lent to its full importance without sacrificing Septuagesima, which is an extension of Lent.
— Annibale Bugnini, The Reform of the Liturgy 1948-1975 (English Edition: Collegeville MN: The Liturgical Press, 1990) p307 n6.
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#3
While Paul VI did away with it, those of us who pray a traditional version of the Breviary or attend a chapel offering the Traditional Rite on a version of the preconciliar calendar still see it come around every year.  


It is a pity that Bugnini and Montini both arrogantly took it upon themselves to pick away at the Tradition in order to simplify and update.
Walk before God in simplicity, and not in subtleties of the mind. Simplicity brings faith; but subtle and intricate speculations bring conceit; and conceit brings withdrawal from God. -Saint Isaac of Syria, Directions on Spiritual Training


"It is impossible in human terms to exaggerate the importance of being in a church or chapel before the Blessed Sacrament as often and for as long as our duties and state of life allow. I very seldom repeat what I say. Let me repeat this sentence. It is impossible in human language to exaggerate the importance of being in a chapel or church before the Blessed Sacrament as often and for as long as our duties and state of life allow. That sentence is the talisman of the highest sanctity. "Father John Hardon
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